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OCLC number
1032899214
Link(s) to full text
LAC copy
Author
Candow, Darren G.
Title
Effect of protein and creatine supplementation during resistance training on muscle mass, strength, and muscle protein degradation in older males.
Degree
Ph. D. -- University of Saskatchewan, 2012
Publisher
Saskatoon :University of Saskatchewan,2012.
Description
1 online resource
Notes
Includes bibliographical references.
Unrestricted.
I hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to University of Saskatchewan or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether nutritional supplementation combined with resistance training could maximize muscle accretion and strength in older men and whether these interventions could eliminate deficits in muscle mass and strength compared to young men. To achieve this purpose, a series of studies were performed. In the first study, the purpose was to determine differences in muscle mass, strength, and power in upper and lower body muscle groups in young and older men. These findings would determine which muscle groups were more negatively affected with age and whether nutritional supplementation and resistance training in older men could eliminate these deficits in muscle mass and strength compared to young men. Results showed that lower body measures of muscle mass, strength, and power, especially at fast velocities, is reduced more than upper body measures in older men. In the second study, the purpose was to determine the effects of protein supplementation immediately before and after training sessions for 12 weeks in older men (59-76 years), and whether this intervention could eliminate deficits in muscle mass and strength compared to young men from the first study. It was hypothesized that protein ingestion immediately before training would increase lean tissue mass and strength over protein ingestion immediately after training. Twenty-nine older men were randomized to supplement with protein or receive placebo. Results showed that the timing of protein supplementation, either before or after resistance training, had no effect on lean tissue mass, muscle thickness or strength. At the end of the study, the older group still had lower lean tissue mass, muscle thickness of the knee extensors and flexors and ankle plantar flexors, and bench press strength compared to young men; suggesting that a longer intervention in required. In the third study, the purpose was to determine the effects of creatine and protein supplementation during resistance training in older men. In addition, these results, combined with the results of 17 subjects from the second study, would determine if 22 weeks of resistance training could eliminate remaining deficits in muscle mass and strength compared to young men. It was hypothesized that creatine and protein together would increase muscle mass and strength over creatine supplementation and placebo during training. Older men (59-77 years) were randomized to receive creatine and protein, creatine, or placebo on training days (i.e.3x/week) during 10 weeks oftraining. Subjects who supplemented with creatine experienced greater gains in total muscle thickness (p<0.05), and the addition of protein to creatine significantly increased lean tissue mass compared to placebo. Following 22 weeks of resistance training, deficits in muscle mass and strength were no longer evident compared to the young. Based on this series of studies, muscle mass, strength, and power are significantly reduced in older compared to younger men. Twenty-two weeks of resistance training in older men is sufficient to eliminate deficits in muscle mass and strength compared to young men. These results have application for health and research professionals for the design of nutritional supplementation and exercise interventions. For optimal increase in muscle mass, one should consume creatine and protein on training days during a resistance training program that incorporates power and strength exercises emphasizing lower body muscle groups.
Other link(s)
library.usask.ca
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