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Short articles to be published at different times in local newspapers, newsletters, eBulletin or website

An invitation for members of First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities to participate in photo identification Project Naming

A new Aboriginal photo identification project

Every picture tells a story! Spurred by the success of the first phase of the photo identification project with Inuit communities from Nunavut, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is now expanding the project to all Aboriginal groups in Canada.

The new chapter of Project Naming is a unique opportunity to contribute to the description and stewardship of Aboriginal cultural heritage and archival records.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities are invited to recall their memories, share their knowledge and engage in the identification of thousands of photographs from LAC’s collection. The majority of individuals depicted in the images were never identified and many archival descriptions relating to events or activities are absent or have dated information (e.g. place and band names or terminology).

Over the last 13 years, approximately 8,000 images have been digitized and nearly 2,000 Inuit individuals, activities and places have been identified. As with the initial phase of Project Naming, LAC hopes that members of the public will share their knowledge.

Invitation to participate in an Aboriginal photo identification project

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is now expanding its popular photo identification project to all Aboriginal groups in Canada.

Aboriginal Canadians, as well as non-Aboriginals, are invited to participate in the identification and description of thousands of photographs from LAC’s collection. This new phase of Project Naming allows people to identify individuals, locations and events in images, as well as correct spellings of names and improve nondescript captions. “In a sense, when we help identify the pictures we are reclaiming our heritage,”said Deborah Webster, an Inuit from Baker Lake, Nunavut, who participated in the first phase of the initiative with the help of her mother.

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