Supplementary information tables 2021–2022

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Sustainable Development Goals

Table 1: Sustainable Development Goals
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)Planned initiativesGlobal or domestic targets and/or global or domestic indicators
SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girlsGender-based analysis plus (GBA+) at Library and Archives Canada (LAC) initiative working group

This committee contributes to:

Global target 5.C: Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels
Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) ambition: “Canadians are well represented at all levels of decision making”

SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization, and foster innovation Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, 2020–2023

This strategy contributes to:

Global target 9.4: By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) related targets:

  • 40% reduction of real property and conventional fleet emissions by 2025
  • Use 100% clean electricity by 2022 where possible, by 2025 at the latest

SDG 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, 2020–2023

This strategy contributes to:

Global target 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

Global target 12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

CIF target: “Zero-emission vehicles represent 10% of new light duty vehicle sales by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040”

FSDS related targets:

  • Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030
  • Administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030
  • Include criteria that address carbon reduction, sustainable plastics and broader environmental benefits into procurements for goods and services that have a high environmental impact.

SDG 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, 2020–2023

This strategy contributes to:

Global target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Global target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Global target 13.3: Improve education, awareness raising, and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

CIF target: “By 2030, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels; greenhouse gases in PSPC Crown-owned building portfolio, excluding housing”

FSDS related targets:

  • By 2022, departments have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations
  • Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030
  • Reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions in relation to 2005 levels

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Table 2: Updates to LAC’s 2020–2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) based on the updated Greening Government Strategy adopted in October 2020
FSDS target(s)FSDS contributing action(s)Corresponding departmental action(s)Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and targetStarting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s)Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Target: Real property and fleet (greenhouse gas [GHG] emissions reductions). Reduce GHG emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% by 2025Footnote1 and net-zero emissionsFootnote2 by 2050.All new buildings and major building retrofits will prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and life-cycle and total-cost-of-ownership assessments that incorporate shadow carbon pricing.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) will:

  • Continue with the construction of Gatineau 2, a net-zero carbon storage facility
  • Assess its current portfolio to determine required steps to achieve net-zero emissionsFootnote3
  • Report annually on GHG emissions across all facilities from electricity, fuel and non-energy sources
  • Assess opportunities to generate on-site renewable electricity
  • Ensure that new facilities meet or exceed leading environmental and efficiency standards
  • Purchase 100% clean electricity by 2022 as part of the Public Services and Procurement Canada–led Government of Canada–wide initiative
  • Explore opportunities for fuel switching

Retrofitting existing buildings to reduce GHG emissions and prioritizing new low- and zero-carbon buildings to minimize additional GHG will allow LAC to meet its target of reducing GHG emissions by 40% by 2025 and achieving net-zero emissions by 2050Footnote4.

Starting point:
Total GHG emissions from LAC facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): 2954 tCO2 [X]
Performance indicator:

  • GHG emissions from facilities in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005–06 to current reporting fiscal year = [1–Y/X]%

Internal Services
Use 100% clean electricity by 2022Footnote5.

Other

Join the Treasury Board Secretariat– and Public Services and Procurement Canada–led initiative to purchase clean electricity for the Government of CanadaLAC will work with federal partners to procure 100% clean electricity by 2022 to contribute toward its emissions reduction target. Starting point:
LAC uses 99.1% clean electricity (2018–19 reporting)
Performance indicators:
  • Electricity consumption in the year = [X] kWh
  • Electricity consumption from non-emitting sources (including renewable energy certificates) in the year = [Y] kWh
  • Percentage (%) of clean electricity = [Y/X]%
Internal Services
Table 2 footnotes
Footnote 1

In the previous version of the 2020 to 2023 DSDS, this was a 2030 target.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

In the previous version of the 2020 to 2023 DSDS, this target was 80% emissions reduction by 2050.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

In the previous version of the 2020 to 2023 DSDS, this action was to identify carbon-reduction opportunities.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

In the previous version of the 2020 to 2023 DSDS, this action was to reduce emissions by 40% by 2030.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

In the previous version of the 2020 to 2023 DSDS, this was a 2025 target.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Details on transfer payment programs

Table 3: Three year plan for Documentary Heritage Communities Program (DHCP)
Start date2015
End dateOngoing
Type of transfer paymentContribution
Type of appropriationMain estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions2018
Link to departmental result(s)Canadians are more aware of their documentary heritage
Link to the department’s Program InventoryOutreach and support to communities
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment programThe DHCP has the following objectives:
  • Increase access to, and awareness of, Canada’s local documentary heritage institutions and their holdings
  • Increase the capacity of local documentary heritage institutions to better sustain and preserve Canada’s documentary heritage
Expected results

Under the DHCP, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) anticipates funding 40 projects annually, to achieve two medium-term results.

First expected result: Increased awareness of and access to local documentary heritage.

Second expected result: Increased capacity for local documentary heritage institutions to better sustain and preserve Canada’s documentary heritage.

At the end of each fiscal year, LAC assesses the achievement of these results through a final evaluation report completed by each recipient. It measures the percentage of recipients that have achieved their expected results.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluationThe evaluation was completed in October 2018: Evaluation of Supporting the Documentary Heritage Communities Program, 2015–2016 to June 2017
Decision following the results of last evaluationContinuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

Not applicable

No program evaluation is planned between now and 2022–23. However, LAC follows up twice a year on the action plan that was developed based on the recommendations of the October 2018 evaluation report.

General targeted recipient groupsLocal documentary heritage organizations eligible to apply to the DHCP are non-profit organizations that hold collections of mainly local or regional significance:
  • Archives
  • Genealogical organizations/societies
  • Historical societies
  • Indigenous government institutions
  • Libraries
  • Organizations with an archival component
  • Professional library and archival associations

All applicants must be privately funded (50% or more) with the exception of Indigenous government institutions

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipientsLAC is committed to continuing to consult with applicants and recipients through traditional communication channels such as advisory committees and national archival conferences. In addition, LAC is committed to organizing training workshops to promote the program and gather feedback from the target audience.
Table 4: Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Total grantsN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total contributions1,500,0001,500,0001,500,0001,500,000
Total other types of transfer paymentsN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total program1,500,0001,500,0001,500,0001,500,000

Gender-based analysis plus

Table 5: Institutional GBA+ Capacity

Library and Archives Canada’s (LAC) gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) governance structures:

  • While the implementation of GBA+ is a shared responsibility involving every sector of the institution, LAC has designated the Strategic Research and Policy Branch as its responsibility centre (Gender Focus Centre) for GBA+. Two full-time equivalents are working half time as leads in setting up LAC’s GBA+ Framework. The Gender Focus Centre also serves as the secretariat for a working group tasked with developing pilot initiatives in all sectors, launched in 2019–2020. This “GBA+ at LAC” working group (WG) oversees the sustainable implementation of GBA+ across LAC.
  • The WG has members from each sector of LAC and is led by two champions. It will continue to deliver its Action Plan in 2021.
  • COVID-19 delayed progress on the GBA+ WG’s activities, so in December 2020, the WG voted to extend its mandate into 2021.

LAC’s GBA+ WG activities:

  • To deliver its GBA+ Action Plan, the WG created three sub-working groups to be responsible for three different areas:
    • Communications: This sub-working group is developing and implementing a communications plan to increase GBA+ awareness at LAC. Initiatives include presentations and a biweekly GBA+ newsletter issued since May 2020 to a growing readership.
    • Training and resources: This sub-working group is examining training options to recommend for employees at LAC and developing tools such as LAC’s own GBA+ analysis grid, which is already being used and refined. The sub-working group is reaching out to other Government of Canada departments such as Women and Gender Equality Canada to share and develop tools and best practices.
    • Pilot initiatives: This sub-working group has identified four policies/programs at LAC to undergo rigorous GBA+ using LAC’s GBA+ analysis grid. Applying the analysis grid to these projects will assist with the development of a user guide for the grid.
  • The WG will develop a final report at the conclusion of its Action Plan that will include recommendations for ongoing governance of GBA+ at LAC, including an overall structure for reporting and the selection of performance indicators.

LAC’s GBA+ Secretariat activities:

  • In addition to its leadership in the WG’s activities, LAC’s GBA+ Secretariat supports GBA+ related requests from across the institution. In 2020, these included one full Treasury Board submission and two off-cycle Treasury Board submissions, as well as GBA+ components in impact analyses of new or updated projects, policies and programs.
  • LAC’s GBA+ Secretariat is also responsible for helping to develop resources and mechanisms leading to more internal disaggregated data collection in support of GBA+. Currently, this requires liaison with Communications and Public Services as well as Corporate Planning and Accountability at LAC, to develop accurate indicators and measurements for GBA+.
Highlights of GBA+ Results Reporting Capacity by Program
Acquisition and processing of government records

Through the acquisition of government records, this program indirectly supports the Gender Results Framework (GRF) pillars of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • These records may be accessed and used by the public, yielding knowledge and information that can further GBA+ aims (e.g. tracing gender-related trends in government staffing or policy).

Acquisition and processing of published heritage

Through the acquisition of published heritage, this program indirectly supports the GRF pillars of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • These records may be accessed and used by the public, yielding knowledge and information that can further GBA+ aims (e.g. tracing gender-related trends in artistic, scholarly or information production).
This program may also have indirect or unintentional negative impacts:
  • As a national library and archive, LAC has an acquisitions strategy that necessarily emphasizes acquisitions of national significance while also trying to represent Canada’s complexity and diversity. Sometimes these priorities are difficult to balance and can result in the exclusion of work by marginalized groups (e.g. women, people of colour, LGBTQ2 people), since until recently these groups have largely been excluded from public life.
  • The LAC GBA+ WG intends to apply GBA+ to LAC’s acquisitions strategy, to reexamine its approach.

Acquisition and processing of private archives

Through the acquisition of private archives, this program indirectly supports the GRF pillars of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • These records may be accessed and used by the public, yielding knowledge and information that can further GBA+ aims (e.g. tracing gender-related trends in the collections and correspondence of private citizens and organizations).

This program may also have indirect or unintentional negative impacts.
  • As a national library and archive, LAC has an acquisitions strategy that necessarily emphasizes acquisitions of national significance while also trying to represent Canada’s complexity and diversity. Sometimes these priorities are difficult to balance and can result in the exclusion of work by marginalized groups (e.g. women, people of colour, LGBTQ2 people), since until recently these groups have largely been excluded from public life.
  • The LAC GBA+ WG intends to apply GBA+ to LAC’s acquisitions strategy, to reexamine its approach.

Preservation

Through the preservation of all LAC holdings, this program indirectly supports the GRF pillars of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • These holdings may in future be accessed and used by the public, yielding knowledge and information that can further GBA+ aims along many different avenues, depending on the purpose of access or focus of research.

This program may also have indirect or unintentional negative impacts.
  • Preservation is an extension of the acquisitions process and is determined by the recommendations of subject experts, who must decide what to dispose of and what to preserve. Increased GBA+ awareness and training will ensure that the stewardship of holdings, as well as their acquisition, is influenced by GBA+.

Public services

This program indirectly supports all GRF pillars, particularly those of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • These holdings may in future be accessed and used by the public, yielding knowledge and information that can further GBA+ aims along many different avenues, depending on the purpose of access or focus of research.

This program may also have indirect or unintentional negative impacts.
  • To ensure that all Canadians have access to records and documentary heritage upon request, barriers to access (physical, geographic, economic and linguistic) must be eliminated. By ensuring equitable access to its collections, and thus to information and cultural heritage, LAC indirectly supports all GRF pillars.
  • In applying GBA+ to LAC’s joint facility project with Ottawa Public Library, LAC’s GBA+ Secretariat has recommended the collection of disaggregated data during the phases of building construction, service design and initial operation, to measure the impact of the project on groups seeking equity and on those with intersecting identity factors.

Outreach and support to communities

This program directly supports the GRF pillars of Education and Skills Development as well as Leadership and Democratic Participation.

  • By increasing digital access to and awareness of its holdings, LAC assists diverse Canadian communities, including Indigenous and gender-diverse communities, to manage their records and access knowledge of their heritage. Awareness of community culture supports Leadership and Democratic Participation.
  • Increasing digital access also increases service delivery capacity for disabled and geographically remote Canadians.

This program indirectly supports all GRF pillars.
  • To ensure the improved visibility of LAC collections and initiatives, barriers to visibility (physical, geographic, economic and linguistic) must be eliminated. By increasing its visibility, LAC encourages access to its collections and services, and thus to information and cultural heritage, which indirectly supports all GRF pillars.



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