Departmental Performance Report (DPR) 2015–2016

Catalogue No. SB1-4E-PDF:
ISSN 2368-2736 Departmental Performance Report (Library and Archives Canada)

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Minister's Message

Photo of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P., 
Minister of Canadian Heritage

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage

For close to 150 years, Canadians have been working together to build an open and inclusive country that draws strength from its diverse culture, its two official languages, and its vibrant museum and heritage scene. The organizations of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, including Library and Archives (LAC), highlight this shared wealth. They preserve our history and promote our cultural content both here at home and beyond our borders. In a world where Canadians’ spirit of innovation and the cutting-edge use of digital technologies continue to grow in importance, I am delighted to present the accomplishments of these organizations.

In order for Canadians to have easy access to their documentary heritage in digital format, whenever and wherever they want, LAC has adopted the Canadian National Heritage Digitization Strategy with its main partners in the archive, library and museum sector. This strategy will allow Canada to position itself among the leading group of countries that have implemented coordinated approaches to facilitate the digital discovery of their culture and history.

I announced the first results of the Documentary Heritage Communities Program in December 2015; thanks to this program, numerous institutions now have the means to showcase their documentary treasures, for the benefit of all Canadians.

I am pleased that LAC has continued to contribute to Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2014–16. Close to 6.7 million pages of government documents have been made accessible in 2015–16, which is a remarkable effort.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I invite you to read the 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report for Library and Archives Canada. In it, you will discover how LAC has fulfilled its mission and helped achieve the goals of the Government of Canada. 

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

Librarian and Archivist of Canada’s Message

Photo of Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Acknowledging the renewed confidence shown by Canada’s documentary community, it was our wish that the year 2015–2016 would be filled with tangible and visible achievements so as to build on this goodwill.

As the following pages show, the colleagues of Library and Archives Canada (LAC) rallied to that vision and delivered on a wide range of promising initiatives. Foremost among these were our initiatives in the field of digitization: 12 million images were digitized either in house or by our major partners, Canadiana and Ancestry. Central to our efforts was the most ambitious digitization project ever undertaken by LAC: the digitization of the service records of 640,000 members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force who served in the First World War. More than 286,000 records were available for consultation on the Internet at the end of 2015–2016, and our plan is to make all of the records available online by the 100th anniversary of the Armistice—November 11, 2018—which should delight both genealogists and historians alike. The number of hits our website gets each year provides us with 90 million reasons to believe that all of these digital initiatives are well worthwhile.

While expanding our virtual offering, we have also been upgrading visitor services provided at 395 Wellington Street in Ottawa. In addition to replying to the thousands of reference inquiries we receive each year, we have been providing Canadians with quality public programming in the form of exhibitions—including the aptly named Hiding in Plain Sight: Discovering the Métis Nation —lectures, symposia and book launches. The beautiful, newly restored Pellan Room on the second floor of 395 Wellington has become a key gathering place.

Other tangible achievements, such as the implementation of the new Documentary Heritage Communities Program, which was launched in June 2015, are the result of listening to our partners from the documentary community. After its first two competitive processes, there can be no doubt that the program is truly addressing community needs. There is also our 2016–2019 Three-Year Plan, developed through consultations with our clients, partners and staff. Similarly, with representatives from the main documentary community associations that make up our Stakeholders’ Forum, we developed the National Heritage Digitization Strategy, which was adopted in November 2015.

“Success has many fathers,” according to a well known proverb. At LAC, we feel that this maxim is all too true: our clients, our partners, our volunteers—the Friends of LAC and the Lowy Collection Council—our donors and our employees are all parents of the remarkable progress we made in 2015–2016.

Guy Berthiaume

Results Highlights

What funds were used?

$91,451,613

Actual Spending

Who was involved?

913

Actual Full-Time Employees (FTE)

Results Highlights

  • In June 2015, the Government of Canada gave its support to the first steps leading to the construction of a new facility referred to as Gatineau 2, which will make it possible to meet future needs for space to preserve textual records.
  • LAC launched a new Documentary Heritage Communities Program, with an annual budget of $1.5 million to carry out a wide range of projects to give Canadians access to their heritage and take interest in it like never before.
  • LAC adopted the Canadian National Heritage Digitization Strategy in collaboration with its main partners in the world of archives, libraries and museums. This strategy will reposition Canada as a leader among countries that have adopted collaborative approaches to facilitate the discovery of their documentary heritage.
  • LAC implemented public programming, thanks to which over 20 exhibitions and other events were held in a number of Canadian cities, including Ottawa, Gatineau, Toronto, Winnipeg and Kingston. These events made it possible to enhance the visibility of the collection and share its importance and wealth with a broad audience.
  • LAC completed processing 98,000 containers of federal records in December 2015, as set out in the plan implemented in response to the recommendations of the 2014 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada.

Section I: Organizational Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

Institutional Head: Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Canadian Heritage

Enabling Instrument: Library and Archives of Canada Act, L.C. 2004, ch. 11

Year of Commencement: 2004

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

Under the Library and Archives of Canada Act, the mandate of Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is as follows:

  • to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations;
  • to be a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society;
  • to facilitate in Canada co-operation among communities involved in the acquisition, preservation, and diffusion of knowledge;
  • to serve as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions.

Responsibilities

Three pillars support LAC’s mandate in the management of documentary heritage:

1. Acquiring and processing documentary heritage

LAC is responsible for collecting documents that have historical value for Canadian society and the Canadian government. Its acquisition process includes the following mechanisms:

  1. Under the legal deposit requirements set out in Library and Archives of Canada Act and the Legal Deposit of Publications Regulations, publishers are required to provide LAC with copies of all works published in Canada;
  2. LAC acquires documents of archival and historical value from Government of Canada departments and agencies. These documents are primarily political, legal or administrative records attesting to the decisions and activities of federal government institutions;
  3. LAC acquires documents of archival and historical value that are representative of Canadian society through various means such as donations from Canadians, non-governmental organizations and the private sector, purchases or web harvesting.

Organizing the collection involves presenting and contextualizing documentary heritage. This process includes the activities by which documents are described, organized and indexed to make them more accessible. The resulting databases, catalogue indexes and other tools assist users in discovering LAC’s information resources.

2. Preserving documentary heritage

LAC has built a vast collection over the years, bringing together, notably, the collections of the former National Archives of Canada (established in 1872) and the former National Library of Canada (established in 1953). The collection includes a variety of information resources of historical value, both analogue and digital, and includes books, government publications, maps, documentary art, photographs, and audio and video recordings.

LAC is responsible for preserving this collection to ensure that it stands the test of time and remains accessible to future generations. It carries out this responsibility by relying on the expertise of its employees who are specialists in preservation, as well as on infrastructure that prevents the deterioration of documents and preserves their long-term integrity, such as the Gatineau Preservation Centre, the Nitrate Film Preservation Facility, and the new storage centre for the high-density collection.

3. Provide access to Canada’s documentary heritage
LAC’s responsibilities with regard to access to documentary heritage are to enable Canadians to easily discover and consult the necessary resources to obtain information, improve their knowledge and enrich their lives. To fulfill those responsibilities, LAC uses cutting-edge technologies and provides information on its collections through its website and social media. This approach is consistent with the Government of Canada’s commitment to open government.

LAC offers access to its information resources by:

  • making information resources available to the public in digital format;
  • offering online services and digital access in order to improve the accessibility of its content;
  • providing services on-site in Ottawa (395 Wellington Street), Winnipeg, Dartmouth and Burnaby;
  • contributing to exhibitions that enable the public to discover LAC’s collection in museums and at cultural sites throughout Canada.

Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Alignment Architecture

The following are the strategic outcomes LAC is striving to achieve as well as the contributing programs:

1.Strategic Outcome: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

  • 1.1 Program: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools
  • 1.2 Program: Collaboration in the management of government records
2. Strategic Outcome: Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations
  • 2.1 Program: Documentation of Canadian society
  • 2.2 Program: Stewardship of documentary heritage
  • 2.3 Program: Access to documentary heritage
  • Internal Services

Operating Environment and Risk Analysis

LAC developed an organizational risk profile for 2015–2018 that identifies strategic and organizational risks, evaluates their consequences and potential impacts and determines the methods to be implemented in order to mitigate the risks. LAC’s organizational risk profile and its 2015–2016 Report on Plans and Priorities identified four strategic risks that could potentially have a direct impact on fulfilling its mandate. The following section provides a description of these risks and their contexts. The planned mitigation strategies (in italics) and progress made on each one are set out in the table below.

Description of the context for each risk

1. Risk that Canadian documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

Given the ever-increasing quantity of information created via new technologies and the speed at which this information can disappear, LAC runs the risk of not acquiring all Canadian documentary heritage of national interest. The scope of its mandate is such that LAC may be unable to identify all the content that should be acquired.

2. Risk that documentary heritage is not preserved for present and future generations

LAC must ensure the integrity and long-term accessibility of the documentary resources acquired. The integrity of the material can be compromised by a variety of external risk factors, such as deterioration over time and with use, and the obsolescence of the technologies needed to consult a format that is outdated. The loss of technical expertise and the lack of space offering adequate storage conditions are considered internal risk factors. 

3. Risk that documentary heritage is not accessible for present and future generations

Despite technological advances, much of LAC’s collection is on paper or other analogue media. The time and effort needed to digitize it, make it discoverable and make it available online are such that LAC must target its efforts to quickly provide access to material that is of greatest interest to Canadians.

4. Risk that Government of Canada institutions do not use regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools developed by LAC

The quantity of information created in the government on a daily basis poses a considerable challenge when it comes to identifying records that have administrative, legal or historical value. Proactive management of government information is therefore essential; it ensures the government's accountability and the best use of information.

Key Risks

Risk

Risk Response Strategy

Link to the Organization's Program(s)

1. Risk that Canadian documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

a) Develop an acquisition strategy.

LAC developed its 2016–2019 Acquisition Strategy in collaboration with the documentary community.

b) Acquire digital content through web archiving and through the implementation of strategies designed to facilitate the transfer of digital material to LAC.

More than 1,600 websites were archived in 2015–2016. LAC is still working on developing mechanisms for facilitating the transfer of electronic theses and digital government records.

c) Finish processing the backlog of government records that have accumulated since their transfer by other departments and agencies.

LAC completed processing 98,000 containers of federal records in December 2015.

Strategic Outcome 2
Program 2.1

2. Risk that documentary heritage is not preserved

a) Maintain the necessary infrastructure to ensure the long-term preservation of holdings.

LAC has made a great deal of progress in implementing its Long-Term Infrastructure Strategy. First, it obtained the Government of Canada’s approval to build a new preservation facility. It was then entrusted with the administration, management and maintenance of its six special-purpose facilities, a task that was previously the responsibility of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Digitally, LAC has completed development of its client-based digital strategy.

b) Continue to digitize LAC’s content by using the institution’s full capacity and by leveraging its partners’ capacity in order to further preserve digital content.

LAC digitized 12 million images in 2015–2016 and completed digitization projects with Canadiana and Ancestry.

c) Continue to migrate the most at-risk analogue information resources.

LAC is in the process of completing the 10-Year Audiovisual Migration Strategy within the established timeframes.

d) In partnership with Shared Services Canada, continue to implement the strategy for increasing digital data management and storage capacity.

LAC added 270 terabyte (TB) of storage space to its infrastructure in 2015–2016 to support increased preservation and access needs.

e) Maintain collaboration and encourage information sharing with preservation experts from other documentary heritage institutions and associations.

LAC strongly encourages the advancement of knowledge in preservation and the sharing of expertise with national and international communities. To this end, LAC employees participate in specialized conferences and play an active role in consultations with experts from the community.

Strategic Outcome 2
Program 2.2

3. Risk that documentary heritage is not accessible

a) Increase access to documentary heritage by partnering with others to advance digitization projects aimed at digitizing and publishing online content that is most frequently requested.

LAC is in the process of digitizing the service records of 640,000 members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force who served in the army sent overseas by Canada during the First World War, to be completed by November 2018.

b) Work with partners in the documentary heritage community to increase the visibility of LAC’s collection.

LAC participates in numerous exhibitions in partnership with the documentary heritage community. Refer to the Program 2.3 section for a list of examples.

c) Continue to deliver expert in-person services by means of multiple delivery channels, such as on-site consultation and direct assistance offered at a distance.

LAC responded to 96,000 service requests in 2015–2016. A Services Consultation Committee was also established to ensure the quality of service to the public. LAC has also begun developing a new public service approach, which will take the form of a new service offer in Halifax and Vancouver in 2016–2017.

d) Continue to share content on social networks to reach a maximum number of clients and to make the collection discoverable through a wide range of distribution channels.

LAC is increasing its use of Web 2.0 tools. Refer to the Program 2.3 section for more details.

e) Design new online resources (including databases, guides and digital content) and update existing resources.

Numerous online resources on immigration and military activities were added during the year. Refer to the Program 2.3 section for more details.

f) Continue with the renewal of the AMICUS database, a catalogue that contains the information resources of hundreds of libraries across Canada.

Discussions are ongoing between LAC, Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) and a service provider to implement a new integrated management system for published heritage.

Strategic Outcome 2
Program 2.3

4. Risk that Government of Canada institutions do not use regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools developed by LAC

a) Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act.

LAC is in the process of completing the plan to provide federal institutions with full and up-to-date disposition coverage by 2017–2018.

b) Provide departments with generic valuation tools to support them in their recordkeeping.

LAC is continuing to provide generic valuation tools. Refer to the Programs 1.1 and 1.2 sections for more details.

Strategic Outcome 1
Programs 1.1 and 1.2

Organizational Priorities

Priority 1: Acquire information resources that are representative of Canadian society

Description: LAC has a mandate to establish Canada's documentary heritage, which is relevant to Canadian society and the Government of Canada. To do this, LAC will continue to enrich its holdings that reflect this heritage, through the appraisal, acquisition and processing of published and unpublished information resources produced in both analogue and digital formats.

Priority TypeFootnote i: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives


Planned Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Status

Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act in order to give them comprehensive disposition coverage.

Ongoing

March 2018

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 1
Program 1.1

Process the backlog of government records that have accumulated since they were transferred by other departments and agencies.

November 2014

December 2015

Completed

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1 and 2.3

Acquire and process documentary heritage that is relevant to Canadians.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1 and 2.3

Acquire digital content through web harvesting and through the implementation of strategies facilitating the transfer of digital material to LAC.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.1

Develop an action plan to acquire records of historical value from parliamentarians following the 2015 federal election.

April 2015

March 2016

Completed

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.1


Progress Toward the Priority

In 2015–2016, LAC expanded its collection by adding 114 private archives, over 140,000 publications and over 1,600 websites, including 1,200 on the October 2015 federal election (more details on the content of these acquisitions are provided in section II of the performance analysis of Program 2.1). LAC also developed the 2016–2019 Acquisition Strategy to focus its acquisition efforts in the areas of published heritage, Canadian government records, and private archives, so as to document the evolution of modern Canadian society.

With respect to managing and acquiring government documents, LAC continued with the implementation of its plan to ensure full and up-to-date disposition coverage for all federal institutions by March 31, 2018. LAC is in the process of achieving this objective, and 64% of federal institutions were receiving full and up-to-date disposition coverage as of March 31, 2016. The processing of 98,000 containers of government documents was also completed in December 2015, as set out in the plan implemented in response to the recommendations of the 2014 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada.

Priority 2: Preserve documentary heritage in analogue and digital formats

Description: LAC is responsible for preserving its collection to ensure that it stands the test of time. It carries out this responsibility by relying on the expertise and know-how of specialists and by making optimal use of the physical and digital infrastructure that prevents the deterioration of documents and preserves their integrity.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives


Planned Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Status

Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Continue to carry out the strategy for migrating audiovisual content and digital media stored on obsolete formats to digital formats to prevent their deterioration and preserve their content.

2009

March 2019

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.2

Support activities designed to preserve LAC's holdings and make them available through restoration, conservation and digitization.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.2

Continue to develop tools that enable LAC to have a digital conservation platform, while increasing its storage capacity to meet the need created by the increase in digital information

Ongoing

Ongoing

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.2


Progress Toward the Priority

LAC made progress in implementing its 10-year Audiovisual Migration Strategy, which was begun in 2009 and is intended to transfer nearly 180,000 hours of at-risk recordings to durable digital formats. By March 31, 2016, 71% of the most at-risk recordings had been migrated. Progress was also made under the migration strategy for unpublished content on obsolete digital formats (such as diskettes).

With regard to preservation, over 45,000 documents had received conservation treatment as of March 31, 2016, to make the documentary heritage accessible for loans, exhibitions, digitization and consultation.

In terms of digital preservation, efforts were made to promote the enhancement of technological capacities and the improvement of processing methods for digital content. During 2015–2016, 1,462 TB of digital content was preserved, which is an increase of 43% over the previous year.

Priority 3: Offer quality services and programs to Canadians and provide access to as much content as possible using digital technologies

Description: Access to its collection remains a focus of LAC’s mandate. LAC ensures that it responds to the needs of Canadians, who expect to find what they are interested in quickly. LAC plans to make more of its collection available online, present dynamic public programming and provide quality services by focusing on a diversified approach.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives


Planned Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Status

Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Continue digitization projects in partnership with other documentary heritage organizations.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.2 and 2.3

Maintain LAC's contribution to the government-wide open government initiative by implementing a proactive holdings review practice, enabling access restrictions to be lifted; and by developing an action plan to enhance the Government of Canada's virtual library, which offers open data sets.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.3

Renew the AMICUS database, containing over
25 million bibliographic records, so that this critical resource for Canadian libraries can leverage new technological advances and fully meet clients' needs.

April 2015

September 2018

Signing of an agreement postponed to 2016–2017

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.3

Increase the visibility of the collection by organizing exhibitions that will fully promote its importance and wealth to a broader public.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.3


Progress Toward the Priority

LAC increased national access to documentary heritage through dynamic public programming, increased online content and excellent services. LAC provides a range of services online, from a distance and in-person in Ottawa, Winnipeg, Dartmouth and Burnaby. These services include reference services, which help clients discover the collection, and on-site consultation services to access the originals. LAC also provides access to government documents and personal records pursuant to the Access to Information Act.

LAC implemented public programming, allowing over 20 exhibitions and other events to be held in a number of Canadian cities, including Ottawa, Gatineau, Toronto, Winnipeg and Kingston. These events made it possible to enhance the visibility of the collection and share its importance and wealth with a broad audience.

LAC digitized over 12 million images in 2015–2016. The digitization and posting online of 640,000 files from the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) has progressed significantly. As of March 31, 2016, 43% of the CEF files had been added to the Soldiers of the First World War Database. That initiative is one of LAC’s main contributions to the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the First World War.

LAC continued its contribution to Canada's Action Plan on Open Government 2014–16 by making a significant quantity of archived federal government documents available using a block review process. As a result, nearly 6.7 million pages of government records were proactively made available in 2015–2016.

Negotiations continued with an external service provider and PSPC in order to replace the AMICUS bibliographic records database with a higher-performance integrated management system for published heritage. LAC also held discussions with its main partners in published heritage to guide the development of the new system.

Priority 4: Adopt a more collaborative approach to fulfill LAC's mandate and support documentary heritage communities

Description: LAC and documentary heritage institutions, such as libraries, archives, museums and other similar organizations, are taking advantage of increased collaboration to acquire, preserve, describe and facilitate access to Canada's documentary heritage. LAC is working with its partners by sharing information, discussing common issues and making use of the strengths of each through partnership agreements.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives


Planned Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Status

Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Increase the capacity of Canadian documentary heritage communities.

April 2015

March 2020

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Contribute to the Government of Canada's initiatives leading up to the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017.

Ongoing

December 2017

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 2
Program 2.3

Increase collaboration with documentary heritage organizations (primarily libraries, archives and museums).

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Continue to work with the academic community by organizing conferences, roundtables and other forums for exchanging ideas.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Strengthen LAC's presence among international organizations of librarians and archivists, in particular through contacts with non-government organizations.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Continue to develop policy instruments based on LAC's collaborative approach.

April 2015

September 2017

In progress

Internal Services


Progress Toward the Priority

LAC increased its collaboration with its partners by providing local institutions with financial assistance to increase their capacity to sustainably preserve, promote and showcase the country’s documentary heritage, signing over 10 partnership agreements with documentary heritage institutions and leveraging the strengths of each for the benefit of all.

Recognizing the contribution of Canada’s documentary heritage community, its users and employees, LAC developed the Three-Year Plan 2016–2019 in collaboration with them. Published on March 31, 2016, the Plan highlights the measurable and quantifiable results that we expect to achieve, in keeping with best practices in reporting.

In this same spirit of collaboration, LAC established four external advisory committees in the areas of Acquisitions, Services, public programming and information technologies. The mandate of these advisory committees is to provide advice on activities, strategies, plans, policies and tools specific to each of the four areas.

To ensure the sustainability and outreach of local documentary heritage institutions, LAC has granted $1.5 million to 65 of the 136 projects that applied for the first cycle of funding of the Documentary Heritage Communities Program. The recipients represent each region of Canada and support official language minority communities and Aboriginal communities. This program promotes the achievement of a wide range of projects to give Canadians access to their heritage and take interest in it like never before.

In December 2015, LAC adopted the Canadian National Heritage Digitization Strategy. This innovative strategy was developed in collaboration with our main partners in the world of archives, libraries and museums. The Strategy will reposition Canada as a leader among countries that have adopted collaborative approaches to facilitate the discovery of their documentary heritage. In particular, the Strategy proposes a cohesive way forward for the digitization of the collections of Canadian memory institutions, to ensure they remain relevant in the digital age by making their collections easily accessible. LAC has also been involved in major digitization projects with Canadiana.ca and Ancestry.ca to increase the amount of content available online and ensure its long-term preservation.

LAC showcased the wealth of its collection offsite by lending certain historical documents to renowned museums, including the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); the Canadian Museum of History (Gatineau); the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (Winnipeg); and the Bellevue House National Historic Site (Kingston), former residence of Sir John A. Macdonald. Furthermore, LAC signed memorandums of understanding with the National Gallery of Canada and the Canadian Museum of History in order to use their spaces to exhibit parts of our collection.

LAC continued its collaboration with the federal government’s initiatives to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017. In particular, LAC entered into a partnership with the Toronto International Film Festival, the Cinémathèque québécoise and Eye on Canada to project 150 moving images throughout Canada in 2017. As part of the initiatives grouped under the title On the Road to 2017, LAC collaborated on various events highlighting key moments in Canada’s history, such as the 100 Years in the Struggle for Women’s Rights symposium.

During the year, LAC held three meetings of the Stakeholders’ Forum, a group bring together the 12 Canadian professional associations with which LAC has the closest relationships, in order to discuss best practices and upcoming trends in documentary heritage communities. LAC also collaborated on the development of the Strategy on Canada’s Archives 2016–2026, with the main national and provincial archival institutions, including the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA), the Association des archivistes du Québec (AAQ), the Canadian Council of Archives (CCA) and the Council of Provincial and Territorial Archivists (CPTA). This Strategy proposes a blueprint to facilitate collaboration within the community to better face the challenge of the digital age.

In 2015–2016, LAC formalized its collaboration with the university community by signing two partnership agreements, one with the University of Ottawa and the other with Dalhousie University, and talks are ongoing with other Canadian universities. To exchange ideas and expertise with the university community, LAC organized two thematic seminars, the first on digital humanities and the second on access to and exploration of documentary resources.

Internationally, LAC reinforced its presence and commitment to organizations of librarians and archivists. As a member of the International Council on Archives, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions and the Association internationale des archives francophones, LAC contributed to the discussion on current issues while enabling its employees to refine and share their expertise. LAC is also actively involved in the development and management of controlled vocabularies with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). LAC’s efforts in collaboration with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the departments of Canadian Heritage and Global Affairs contributed to achieving the Government of Canada’s foreign policy objectives to revitalize public diplomacy in priority areas and improve Canada’s image on the international stage.

Priority 5: Develop the infrastructure and the skills needed to manage documentary heritage

Description: The goals associated with this priority contribute to making LAC a leading institution in archival and library science and new technologies, because of the quality of all its employees and physical and technological infrastructure.

LAC plans to build on and invest in the expertise of its employees and in the technologies it uses. With regard to physical infrastructure, LAC is working to develop solutions to ensure sustainable management of the spaces used to preserve its analogue collection (paper records, maps, etc.).

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives


Planned Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Status

Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Continue to develop a long-term infrastructure strategy to meet needs related to preservation space and access to information resources, while improving the conditions for preserving documentary heritage in analogue format.

April 2012

TBD

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.2, 2.3 and Internal Services

Implement a client-based digital strategy.

April 2015

TBD

In progress

Strategic
Outcome 2
Programs 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Provide the necessary support and direction for developing the competencies that will enable LAC to be a leading institution in documentary heritage management.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Recurrent

Internal Services

Review LAC's business processes to make them as effective and efficient as possible.

April 2015

March 2016

Completed

Strategic
Outcomes 1 and 2
Programs 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3


Progress Toward the Priority

Major strides have been made with regard to developing infrastructure to meet needs related to preservation space and access. In June 2015, the Government of Canada gave its support for the first steps leading to the construction of a new facility, referred to as Gatineau 2, to be dedicated to the preservation of textual records. LAC is continuing to explore the possibility of entering into a partnership with the Ottawa Public Library for the construction of a new joint facility in the National Capital Region.

In June 2015, the Government of Canada approved the transfer to LAC of the management and the associated resources of its six special-purpose facilities, which, up until March 31, 2016, had been managed by PSPC.

LAC completed its digital strategy to standardize the management of digital content and incorporate it into all operations. In addition, LAC began a major process of consultation with the industry to identify the technological and digital solutions that could contribute to LAC’s preservation and access efforts. This platform would make it possible to respond more effectively to needs related to the management of digital content, from acquisition to access, by means of permanent preservation.

The Operations sector reviewed its organizational structure in order to make its business processes more efficient and effective. LAC also took the opportunity to develop generic work descriptions that reflect the new duties required. As the work descriptions are completed, the skills required for each position are identified and used for staffing, as well as for performance and talent management.

Knowledge sharing is at the heart of the development of competencies that enable employees to be on the leading edge of their field of expertise. Consequently, LAC organized the Wallot-Sylvestre Seminars, which provide speaking opportunities for national and international experts in the fields of information sciences, library science, archival science and history. These seminars, like our colleagues’ Discoveries series and the Signatures magazine, are concrete examples of the knowledge sharing we promote.

Section II: Expenditure Overview

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)


2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending
(authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

93,011,489

93,011,489

104,222,256

91,451,613

-1,559,876


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])


2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

867

913

46

Budgetary Performance Summary

The difference between planned spending of $93 million shown in the 2015–2016 Report on Plans and Priorities and total authorities of $104.2 million is explained by the additional funding received during the year:

  • A transfer of PSPC funds to support the administration of six special-purpose facilities to be used for preservation and for which LAC has been responsible since April 1, 2016;
  • A transfer from the Treasury Board Secretariat for the operating budget carry-forward from 2014–2015 to 2015–2016.

In addition, the variance between the total authorities of $104.2 million and the actual spending of $91.5 million is explained by the statements below. They also corroborate the variations within programs.

  • An amount carried forward to fund a portion of the construction, management and payment upon substantial performance of the work for a new facility in Gatineau, Quebec, for Library and Archives Canada (Gatineau 2) – Stewardship of documentary heritage (Program 2.2);
  • An amount carried forward in preparation for potential pressure resulting from the renewal of collective agreements; 
  • Expenses carried forward following the suspension of negotiations with the provider during the election period (acquisition of an integrated library management service – Access to documentary heritage (Program 2.3)).

The discrepancy between the planned number and actual number of Full-Time Equivalents is explained primarily by the hiring of temporary employees for the preparation and digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force files (Stewardship of documentary heritage – Program 2.2 and Access to documentary heritage – Program 2.3) and to support the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (Access to documentary heritage – Program 2.3).

Budgetary Performance Summary for Program(s) and Internal Services (dollars)

See the table

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Bar Graph (dollars)

 

The graph above shows the spending trend of Library and Archives Canada, in dollars, over a period of six years from 2013–2014 to 2018–2019 (three financial years of actual spending and three financial years of planned spending) by total spending.

The increase in spending beginning in 2016–2017 is explained by the transfer of PSPC funds to support the administration of six special-purpose facilities to be used for preservation and for which LAC has been responsible since April 1, 2016.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on the Library and Archives Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2016 on the PSPC website.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015–16 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework
(dollars)


Strategic outcome

Program

Spending Area

Government of Canada Outcome

2015–16
Actual Spending

1. Current government information is managed to support government accountability

1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

2,636,780

1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

4,797,140

2. Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations

2.1: Documentation of Canadian society

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

13,525,770

2.2: Stewardship of documentary heritage

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

13,905,973

2.3: Access to documentary heritage

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

25,694,773


Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area

Total Planned Spending

Total Actual Spending

Economic affairs

0

0

Social affairs

58,096,652

53,126,516

International affairs

0

0

Government affairs

8,965,907

7,433,920

Financial Statements and Financial Statements Highlights

Financial Statements

LAC's financial statements can be consulted on its website.

Financial Statements Highlights

The highlights presented in this section are taken from LAC's financial statements and are prepared on a full accrual basis. These financial statements have been prepared using Government of Canada accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

The variance between the figures provided in other sections of this report, which were prepared on an expenditure basis, and the figures that follow, which were prepared on an accrual basis, relates to accrual entries such as the recognition of services without charge received from other government departments and the acquisition of capital assets and related amortization expenses, as well as to accrued liability adjustments.

Library and Archives Canada
Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016
(dollars)

Financial Information

2015–16
Planned
Results

2015–16
Actual

2014–15
Actual

Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2015–16 planned)

Difference (2015–16 actual minus 2014–15 actual)

Total expenses

141,295,947

137,092,008

160,461,016

-4,203,939

-23,369,008

Total revenues

2,231,000

1,369,701

2,350,174

-861,299

-980,473

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

139,064,947

135,722,307

158,110,842

-3,342,640

-22,388,535

Departmental net financial position

 

30,844,170

32,993,714

 

-2,149,544


The difference in total expenses is due primarily to reduced expenses allocated to salary and professional services, reduced expenses for common services provided without charge by other departments and reduced loss on disposal and write-off of tangible capital assets.

Library and Archives Canada
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2016 (dollars)

Financial Information

2015–16

2014–15

Difference
(2015–16 minus
2014–15)

Total net liabilities

19,222,055

20,463,455

-1,241,400

Total net financial assets

10,039,065

11,657,481

-1,619,416

Departmental net debt

9,182,990

8,805,974

377,016

Total non-financial assets

40,027,160

41,799,688

-1,772,528

Departmental net financial position

30,844,170

32,993,714

-2,149,544


The decrease in net financial assets is attributable primarily to a decrease in the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund account, stemming from the decrease in accounts payable.

The decrease in net non-financial assets is mainly attributable to the disposal and write-off of tangible capital assets.

Section III: Analysis of Program(s) and Internal Services

Strategic outcome 1: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

Program 1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

To support effective recordkeeping in federal institutions, LAC issues records disposition authorities. These authorities specify the documents of historical interest to be transferred to LAC at the end of their useful life. The other documents are disposed of by the institution that generated them at the end of their retention period.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

LAC has made a great deal of progress on implementing the plan to give federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act (LAC Act) comprehensive and up-to-date disposition coverage by March 31, 2018. This plan was created in response to the recommendations of the Office of the Auditor General to improve the efficiency of government records management. Since November 2014, LAC has provided disposition authorities to 88 federal institutions, 60 of which were given in 2015–2016, which brought the percentage of institutions with comprehensive and up-to-date coverage to 64%. Institutions that have such disposition coverage can efficiently process records that no longer have operational value at the end of their period of use, either through transfer to the LAC collection (for records with historical value) or through their destruction (for records that no longer have operational value).

Discussions were also held with organizations that are not subject to the LAC Act in order to prepare an agreement for the disposition of their documents. The Multi-Institutional Disposition Authority (MIDA) for digital documents was completed and will be released by the Treasury Board in 2016–2017. MIDAs address records that are common across federal institutions. A new Transitory Disposition AuthorityFootnote ii was also issued to enable federal institutions to destroy such records.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)


2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

2,753,175

2,753,175

2,784,158

2,636,780

-116,395


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])


2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

26

28

2


Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

A regulatory regime is established across the Government of Canada so that government information is managed and disposed of appropriately

Percentage of federal government institutions supported by complete records disposition coverage

30%

64%

Program 1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

In collaboration with central agencies, federal departments and agencies and other partners, LAC plays an essential role in developing standards, tools and best practices relating to information management and recordkeeping.

LAC helps federal institutions manage information by:

  • offering guidance on the retention and management of records to central agencies, other federal institutions and intergovernmental committees;
  • staging information and awareness sessions for federal employees during colloquiums and forums on recordkeeping;
  • establishing networks within the government's information management community;
  • coordinating initiatives that support the efforts of federal libraries and their respective departments.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2015–2016, LAC collaborated with federal departments and agencies to assess the volume of digital content they may receive in the coming years. Given the results of a survey conducted with a sample of departments, LAC estimates that the volume of digital records created by the federal public service will nearly quadruple between 2013 and 2020. As a result, LAC is working to implement the technology needed to transfer such a volume and, particularly, to transfer documents from the GCDOCS system, which is the standard in terms of managing electronic documents in the federal government.

With regard to the management of paper documents, the regional service centres have completed the implementation of the new service model for storing government records. LAC has informed federal institutions that from now on only documents with historical value will be stored and that the Atlantic and Pacific regional service centres will be closed by March 2017. The relocation of certain documents from those two centres began in December 2015.

LAC plans to give a new direction to the services provided in the region. In Vancouver, LAC intends to store, manage and provide access to all archival records created by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (and the institutions that preceded it) in British Colombia, while providing reference services and public programming from a more central and visible location. In Halifax, LAC will provide a full range of services, including public programming, at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.

In 2015–2016, LAC collaborated on several information management initiatives, including the second phase of the National Research Council of Canada's federal science library project. This project involves developing a platform and service delivery model for seven science-based departments and then extending those services to other government agencies. Following consultations with 19 federal institutions, LAC developed a series of detailed requirements to implement the open government policy. A policy instrument was developed to enable LAC to lift the restrictions on records when possible and to establish criteria that institutions must meet prior to transferring documents to LAC. The implementation of this policy instrument will be coordinated with the Government of Canada's open government deadlines.

Internationally, LAC participated in the revision of standard ISO 15489-1:2016 to respond to the realities of creating and managing digital records. LAC also contributed to UNESCO's PERSIST project, which unites the IT industry, governments and heritage institutions to discuss and work together on digital preservation solutions. More specifically, LAC contributed to developing the Guidelines for the selection of digital heritage for long-term preservation, which support the implementation of digital documentary heritage acquisition policies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)


2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

6,212,732

6,212,732

5,186,416

4,797,140

-1,415,592


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

82

59

-23


Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Increased capacity and readiness to manage Government of Canada information effectively

Percentage of federal government institutions that undertake disposition activities in accordance with their disposition instruments

75%

63%

Strategic Outcome 2 : Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations

Program 2.1: Documentation of Canadian society

One of the pillars of LAC’s mandate is to assess and acquire a documentary heritage that is representative of Canadian society and that will be available to present and future generations. LAC’s holdings consist of published and unpublished documentary resources in a variety of formats and media, both analogue and digital.

This program includes all activities designed to evaluate, acquire and process Canada’s documentary heritage. LAC strives to guarantee the authenticity of this heritage and the relevance of its collection.

LAC acquisitions are governed by legal texts, as follows:

  • in accordance with the Legal Deposit of Publications Regulations and the Library and Archives of Canada Act, Canadian publishers must deposit copies of all their publications with LAC;
  • under the Library and Archives of Canada Act, government information resources of historical value must be transferred to LAC once their retention period has expired.

LAC is also mandated to acquire documents of historical interest created by persons, non-governmental organizations and the private sector to build a collection representative of Canadian society.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

LAC adopted the 2016–2019 Acquisition Strategy and a new Evaluation and Acquisition Policy Framework to target its acquisitions in the areas of published heritage, Government of Canada records and private archives. The Strategy enables LAC to make acquisition choices on the basis of strategic themes: Aboriginal peoples, regional diversity, cultural diversity, Francophone culture, minorities, and gender issues. These themes were identified based on discussions with LAC’s partners and the Acquisitions Advisory Committee, as well as an analysis of the current status of LAC’s collections and national and international issues facing today’s Canada.

LAC took the initiative to make its recent acquisitions public on its website and update them quarterly. The following links help inform Canadians in a timely manner of LAC’s acquisitions in the areas of archives and publications.

During the year, LAC acquired 114 private archives (including additions to existing holdings), 611 government recordings and nearly 140,000 publications. More than 1,600 websites were archived, nearly 1,200 of which were associated with the October 2015 federal election. Following the election, an action plan was deployed to help elected officials and MPs who were not re-elected with managing their records.

The processing of 98,000 boxes of federal documents that had accumulated was completed in December 2015, as set out in the plan implemented in response to the recommendations of the 2014 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada. To prevent such a backlog from recurring, LAC is implementing a monitoring plan to alert it to any future backlog.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

11,591,441

11,591,441

13,960,086

13,525,770

1,934,329


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

130

143

13


Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Library and Archives Canada effectively acquires documentary heritage

Percentage of answers given to individuals and organizations that meet service standards

95%

95%

Program 2.2: Stewardship of Documentary Heritage

LAC manages a vast collection of records in a wide variety of formats, both digital and analogue. Traditional and cutting-edge archival and preservation techniques ensure the long-term preservation of materials in many different formats. Special-purpose buildings under the care of LAC, including the Gatineau Preservation Centre, the Nitrate Film Preservation Centre and the high-density storage facility, provide optimal conditions for preventing the deterioration of documents and ensuring their physical integrity, authenticity and long-term availability.

Stewardship activities are broken down into a number of categories: those related to the physical management of the collection, such as circulation and storage; those involving restoration and conservation, which include preventing records from deteriorating and repairing those already damaged; and, finally, those associated with reproduction and replacement copies, which ensure the preservation and availability of fragile records. For digital records, innovative strategies are implemented to maintain access and ensure that content is protected through proper transfer and storage.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

LAC has made a great deal of progress in implementing its 10-year Audiovisual Migration Strategy, which is intended to transfer nearly 180,000 hours of at-risk recordings to durable digital formats. By March 31, 2016, 71% of the most at-risk recordings had been migrated. LAC is complying with the timeframes in its 10-year Strategy, which began in 2009.

In terms of digital preservation, LAC has improved its preservation capacity and content processing methods. LAC added 270 TB of storage space to its infrastructure in 2015–2016 to support increased preservation and access needs. A total of 1,462 TB of content was permanently preserved during the year, which is an increase of 43% over the previous year. LAC’s digital collection now totals 5.2 petabytes (PB) of content (5,200 TB). It encompasses the content of digitization projects and documents created in digital format, such as government records and digital publications.

With regard to preservation, over 45,000 documents received conservation treatment to make the documentary heritage accessible for loans, exhibitions, digitization and consultation. The preservation team also provided its expertise and support to national and international communities by offering training and guidance and participating in the furthering of knowledge in the field.

LAC also made significant progress on digitizing its content. The details on the performance related to the main digitization projects are presented in the Program 2.3 section. Information on the implementation of the long-term infrastructure strategy is presented in the Internal Services section.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

16,742,862

16,742,862

22,961,090

13,905,973

-2,836,889


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

124

148

24


Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

The LAC collection is safeguarded for current and future generations

Percentage of at-risk audiovisual material migrated from an obsolete format to a widely used digital format

67%

71%

Percentage increase of digital material stored (includes both born-digital and digitized records)

20% (1,200 TB)

43%
LAC preserved 1,462 terabytes (TB) of digital data in 2015–2016, compared with 1,020 TB in 2014–2015

Program 2.3: Access to documentary heritage

This program is designed to make Canada’s documentary heritage known and available to Canadians. The program includes activities through which this documentary heritage is digitized, described, organized and indexed. The digital content, databases, catalogue index and associated tools help users find the documentary resources for which LAC is responsible.

The program also includes activities that help make the documentary heritage available. LAC provides information and consultation, reproduction and lending services to a wide range of users. These services can be accessed in a number of ways: in person, by phone, by mail, or by internet.

Under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, LAC helps make government documents available by providing, among other things, information found in the personnel files of former public service employees and members of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Lastly, the Documentary Heritage Communities Program provides financial contributions to support the preservation, availability, and promotion of documentary heritage through archival services, libraries funded by private funds, historical societies, genealogical societies, professional associations and museums with an archival service.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

LAC improved access to its collection by increasing the amount of content available online on its website and those of its partners. The digitization and posting of 640,000 files from the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) progressed significantly during the year. As of March 31, 2016, 43% of the CEF files had been added to the Soldiers of the First World War Database. LAC also launched 100 Stories: Canadians who served in the First World War, an online memorial featuring the stories of 100 of these men and women who experienced war first-hand (33 of 100 stories had been posted online as of March 31, 2016).

LAC digitized over 12 million images in 2015–2016, and received the support of its partners to digitize and post the content of its collection online:

  • LAC and Canadiana completed their project to digitize microfilm reels, and 37 million images are now available without charge on the Canadiana website. The digitized content is on genealogy, government records and military and Aboriginal documentary heritage.
  • Ancestry digitized 1.5 million images from LAC’s collection, which are available on its website.

With its contribution to Canada's Action Plan on Open Government 2014–16, LAC made a significant quantity of archived federal government documents available using a block review process that makes it possible to proactively lift access restrictions on government documents. As a result, nearly 6.7 million pages of government documents were made available in 2015–2016 and nearly 18 million pages since the initiative began in 2010. LAC also contributed to the open government Open Data Portal by uploading 84 open datasets on subjects as varied as rare books, geography, health, immigration, the environment and the files of CEF members.

Clients made 96,000 service requests in person, online, by telephone or by mail. LAC provided its clients with over 1.5 million pages in digital or paper format.

In 2015–2016, LAC increased the visibility of its collection through the development of dynamic public programming. Around 20 events and exhibitions took place in several Canadian cities. LAC also collaborated with its partners to showcase a wide range of its holdings to a broad audience:

  • In collaboration with the National Gallery of Canada, LAC held two exhibitions: For the Record: Early Canadian Travel Photography and Mirrors with Memory: Daguerreotypes from Library and Archives Canada;
  • In partnership with the Bellevue House in Kingston and the Canadian Museum of History, LAC launched the exhibition Sir John A. Macdonald: Rare and intriguing treasures from the vaults of Library and Archives Canada;
  • In partnership with the Hockey Hall of Fame, LAC contributed to an exhibition highlighting the repercussions of the First World War on professional hockey players;
  • LAC loaned items from its collection to the Canadian Museum of History for the exhibition 1867 – Rebellion and Confederation;
  • LAC also loaned fundamental human rights documents to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, including the Proclamation of the Constitution Act, 1982 and the Canadian Bill of Rights, signed in 1960.

Public programming also contributed to revitalizing LAC’s access building at 395 Wellington Street in Ottawa. A number of major events were held there, including conferences, colloquiums, musical performances and exhibitions:

  • Hiding in Plain Sight: Discovering the Métis Nation;
  • 100 Years in the Struggle for Women’s Rights;
  • Double Take: Portraits of Intriguing Canadians;
  • Hockey Marching as to War.

Media and social networks are increasingly being used to share LAC’s collection:

  • 32 photo albums were shared on the Flickr page, which received over 4.2 million views during the year.
  • 274 posts were published on the blog, which was read over 180,000 times.
  • 10 new podcast episodes were broadcast and were downloaded over 180,000 times.
  • LAC’s Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages were also widely used to publish content. The number of subscribers to those pages increased 75% during the year.

The TD Summer Reading Club achieved record success with the 300,000 children who enrolled in the program’s activities. The goal of the reading club is to encourage children to acquire and maintain reading skills during the summer. The program is funded by the TD Bank Group and is offered in partnership with the Toronto Public Library.

LAC promoted access to its collection by making it easier to find through new research tools and new online resources. New databases were made public to facilitate genealogical and historical research:

LAC also made progress in its discussions with an integrated library management service provider, PSPC and the library community in order to replace AMICUS with a new integrated management system for published heritage.

In addition, LAC improved access to its collection through a Policy on Copyright Management that lays down guidelines for a risk-managed approach that provides a balance between the rights of copyright holders and content users.

In June 2015, LAC launched the Documentary Heritage Communities Program. As a result, LAC reinforced its commitment to supporting the development of libraries and local archive services and contributing to the dissemination of documentary heritage. Since the Program was announced, LAC has completed the first round of funding, which benefited 65 projects. A second funding cycle was launched for 2016–2017, and 155 applications had been received as of February 2016.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

29,762,349

29,762,349

28,687,056

25,694,773

-4,067,576


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

282

311

29


Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Improved access to Canada's documentary heritage

Percentage increase of digital material downloaded by clients from LAC's website

New indicator for which the benchmark was established for 2016-17

11,481,954 files downloaded during the year

Percentage of service standards met for formal access to information and privacy (ATIP) requests

95%

88%

Percentage of service standards met for digital copies

90%

97%

Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the organization. They include the following services: Management and Oversight; Communications; Legal Services; Human Resources Management; Departmental Security; Financial Management; Information Management; Information Technology; Real Property Services; Material Services; Acquisition Management; Policy; Strategic Research; Planning; Evaluation and other administrative services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those allocated specifically to a program.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

LAC has developed a Three-Year Plan that presents its commitments and expected outcomes for the period from 2016 to 2019. These outcomes are presented in a measurable and quantifiable way, in accordance with best practices in reporting. The plan is the result of a vast consultation process with users, the documentary community and LAC employees.

Significant progress has been made in implementing LAC’s long-term infrastructure strategy. The strategy was developed to meet future needs in terms of preservation space and access:

  • In June 2015, the Government of Canada approved the project to build Gatineau 2, a new facility dedicated to the preservation of textual records. As of March 31, 2016, the project was progressing according to schedule. The governance structure of this large-scale project was implemented and is compliant with the federal government’s Public-Private Partnership (P3) Procurement Approach.
  • The Government of Canada also approved the transfer of the administration of six special-purpose facilities that LAC uses and that were previously managed by PSPC. This change in administration means that, since March 31, 2016, LAC has been responsible for the management and administration of these facilities.
  • The relocation of certain collections has begun in order to clear the two regional service centres in the Atlantic and the Pacific, which will close by March 2017.
  • LAC is also continuing to explore the possibility of entering into a partnership with the Ottawa Public Library to construct a large new central facility in the National Capital Region.

With regard to the development of digital infrastructure, LAC has completed its client-based digital strategy. LAC also met with 24 technology solutions providers to discuss options for implementing a digital preservation platform.

In 2015–2016, LAC worked on the development of 12 strategic policy instruments to be used to govern its operations more effectively. These policies were developed using a collaborative approach with working groups, formal consultations with other federal agencies and external and internal committees and the support of our legal services.

The Operations sector reviewed its organizational structure in order to make its business processes more efficient and effective. LAC also took the opportunity to develop generic work descriptions that reflect the new duties required by these processes. As the work descriptions are completed, the skills required for each position are identified and used for staffing as well as for performance and talent management.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

25,948,930

25,948,930

30,643,450

30,891,177

4,942,247


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

223

224

1


Performance Results

Section IV: Supplementary Information

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Library and Archives Canada’s website.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Evaluations
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects
  • User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions,rals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Report of Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Library and Archives Canada

550 De la Cité Blvd
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0N4
Telephone: 613-996-5115
Telephone (toll-free): 1-866-578-7777
TTY: 613-992-6969 or 1-866-299-1699
Facsimile: 613-995-6274
www.bac-lac.gc.ca

395 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N4
Telephone: 613-996-5115
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Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16 high‑level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats) : A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance (rendement) : What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities (priorité): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three‑year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Results (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long‑term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset program (programme temporisé): A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Whole‑of‑government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government‑wide, high‑level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

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