Departmental Performance Report (DPR) 2013–2014: Table of Contents, Message from the Minister, Section I

ISSN 2368-2736 

Table of Contents

Foreword

Minister's message

Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

Section II: Analysis of programs by strategic outcomes

Section III: Supplementary information

Section IV: Organizational contact information

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates series of documents. These documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts that can be spent by the Government and for which purposes. The Estimates documents have three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans established by each department and agency receiving parliamentary appropriations (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates, or that were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada, which include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The Policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

Some changes have been made to DPRs for 2013–2014 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

The DPR's format and terminology have also been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, information reported by departments and agencies on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table, which will be posted on their websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Minister's message

Photo of the Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P., Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages
The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and its portfolio organizations, including Library and Archives Canada (LAC), contribute in many ways to Canadians' quality of life. Together, they support our country's creators, showcase their talent and encourage their sense of innovation, including in the digital world. They also help foster the creation of an environment in which all Canadians can enjoy diverse cultural experiences while also preserving and celebrating our linguistic duality and rich heritage. As we prepare to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation in 2017, we can be proud of the institutions that are at the heart of the cultural, social and economic lives of our communities. They help make Canada a creative country that is both proud of its past and focused on the future.

Fiscal year 2013–14 proved to be rich in achievements for LAC. New methods of managing Canada's documentary heritage were implemented. A content digitization strategy was put in place; it focuses on topics of interest to Canadians and represents a major contribution to the commemorative events leading up to the 150th anniversary of Canada's Confederation in 2017. Under this initiative, LAC and its partners digitized more than 17 million pages of the collection to make them accessible to Canadians and preserve the content for present and future generations.

In addition, LAC acquired information resources that are of critical importance for documenting the evolution of Canadian society. These include a manuscript diary about the 1758 siege of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island, as well as the holdings of Sir John Coape Sherbrooke—the largest and most complete collection of records about the War of 1812.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, I am pleased to present the Departmental Performance Report 2013–14 for LAC. This document provides a detailed description of LAC's accomplishments over the past year. I invite you to review this report's contents to learn more about the initiatives LAC has undertaken to fulfill its mandate, support our Government's priorities and serve Canadians from coast to coast to coast effectively and diligently.

 

The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.

Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

Organizational profile

Responsible Minister: Shelly Glover, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Deputy Head: Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Canadian Heritage

Authority: Library and Archives of Canada Act, S.C. 2004, c. 11 i

Year created: 2004

Other:

  • Headquarters
    550 de la Cité Boulevard
    Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0N4
    Canada

    Website
    www.bac-lac.gc.ca

Organizational context

Raison d'être

Under the Library and Archives of Canada Act, ii the mandate of Library and Archives Canada is as follows:

  • to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations;
  • to serve as a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society;
  • to facilitate in Canada co-operation among the communities involved in the acquisition, preservation, and diffusion of knowledge; and
  • to serve as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions.

Responsibilities

LAC's mandate to manage Canada's documentary heritage is based on three pillars:

1. Evaluating and acquiring documentary heritage

LAC is responsible for acquiring Canada's documentary heritage. Its acquisition process is three-fold:

  1. Under the legal deposit requirements set out in the Library and Archives of Canada Act and the Legal Deposit of Publications Regulations, iii publishers must provide LAC with copies of all publications that they publish in Canada.
  2. LAC acquires information resources of enduring value from Government of Canada departments and agencies. They are primarily records that are political, legal or administrative in nature, and that relate to the institutions' decisions and activities. In addition, LAC issues disposition authorities to federal institutions and offers them support in recordkeeping.
  3. LAC also enhances its collections by acquiring information resources that are representative of Canadian society. These acquisitions are made through various discretionary means, such as donations from Canadians and private corporations, purchases or web harvesting.
2. Preserving documentary heritage

LAC has built a vast collection over the years, bringing together, notably, the collections of the former National Archives of Canada (established in 1872) and the former National Library of Canada (established in 1953). The collection has a variety of information resources, both analogue and digital, in the form of books, government publications, maps, works of art, photographs, and audio and video recordings.

LAC is responsible for preserving this collection to ensure that it stands the test of time and remains accessible to present and future generations. It carries out this responsibility in two ways: first, by relying on the expertise and know-how of its employees who are specialists in preservation and digitization; and second, by making optimal use of the infrastructures that prevent the deterioration of records and preserve their long-term integrity, such as the Preservation Centre, the Nitrate Film Preservation Facility, and the new high-density storage facility.

3. Facilitating access to Canada's documentary heritage

LAC wants to make its collection as accessible as possible to the general public. The institution therefore offers a variety of ways for the public to access it: in‑person visits, virtual access via its website, and loans to other institutions. In addition, LAC ensures that the material in its possession is properly described so that search engines find it easily.

More and more clients prefer digital when it comes to accessing documentary heritage. For this reason, LAC is integrating digital services into all its orientation and reference services, whether they be in person, by telephone, email or mail. Because of the digitization projects being carried out by LAC and its partners, clients can now go online iv to access a growing proportion of information resources from LAC's collection. The increased availability supports the Government of Canada's commitment to being an open government.v

LAC's documentary heritage is also featured in the exhibitions that are organized with other memory institutions to promote Canadian culture and highlight various historical events.

Strategic outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

  • 1. Strategic outcome: Current government information is managed to support government accountability
    • 1.1 Program: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools
    • 1.2 Program: Collaboration in the management of government records
  • 2. Strategic outcome Canada's continuing memory is documented and made accessible to current and future generations
    • 2.1 Program: Documentation of the Canadian experience
    • 2.2 Program: Preservation of continuing memory
    • 2.3 Program: Exploration of documentary resources
      • 2.3.1  Subprogram: Description and contextualization of documents
      • 2.3.2  Subprogram: Promote and make documentary heritage available
    • Internal services

Organizational priorities

Fiscal year 2013–2014 saw the implementation of new practices aimed at ensuring that LAC would continue to acquire Canadian documentary heritage, manage it efficiently, and make it easier to access. To this end, LAC developed and implemented its Evaluation and Acquisition Policy Framework and its Access Policy Framework, and moved toward completing its Stewardship Policy Framework. These policy frameworks and their related instruments are critical tools in helping LAC carry out its activities and fulfill its mandate.

In 2013–2014, LAC achieved most of the objectives that had been set for the following organizational priorities, as presented in the 2013–2014 Report on Plans and Priorities:vi

  1. LAC will use a Whole-of-Society Approach to acquire Canada's documentary heritage;
  2. LAC will continue to strengthen its ability to preserve digital and analogue holdings;
  3. LAC will implement its new digital business model to improve access to its holdings;
  4. LAC will advance a collaborative approach to meet the challenges of managing Canada's documentary heritage; and
  5. LAC will acquire the infrastructure and the new skills it needs to manage documentary heritage in the 21st century.

Priority 1

Typevii

Strategic outcome and program

LAC will use a Whole-of-Society Approach to acquire Canada's documentary heritage

Ongoing

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.1

Summary of progress

What progress has been made toward this priority?

The priority was met as the key components of the Evaluation and Acquisition Framework were developed and implemented. The framework enables LAC to acquire resources of enduring value that document the many facets of Canadian society—regardless of their format (analogue or digital), form (published or not), or source (public or private)—and thereby contributes directly to achieving the objectives of Program 2.1.

Implementation of the framework has allowed LAC to enrich its collection with a large quantity of information resources of national significance to Canadians. LAC acquired 76 private archival holdings, nearly 150,000 publications, and more than 1,100 websites. In addition, 1,583 government transfers were recorded. (For details on these acquisitions, see the Program 2.1 performance analysis in Section II.)

Priority 2

Type

Strategic outcome and program

LAC will continue to strengthen its ability to preserve digital and analogue holdings

Previously committed to

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.2

Summary of progress

What progress has been made toward this priority?

LAC achieved the objectives by continuing to strengthen its capacity to preserve documentary heritage so that it is accessible for future generations (in keeping with Program 2.2 preservation objectives). In 2013–2014, LAC made progress in supporting its digitization efforts, which will continue in the coming years. It also began processing the service files of members enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) during the First World War. The digitization of this collection will be completed by the end of 2015–2016; it will be a major contribution to the commemoration of the centenary of the First World War and the celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017.

LAC also met the performance targets it had set for implementing its audiovisual migration strategy and the migration strategy for unpublished content recorded on outdated digital media (such as diskettes and floppy disks).

LAC pursued its work to become a trusted digital repository able to receive, store and manage digital content, and make it available. In 2013–2014, three policy instruments were developed to this end.

Lastly, LAC also made progress in preserving analogue information resources. Construction work for its new high-density storage facility was completed, and significant progress was made in moving the collection.

Priority 3

Type

Strategic outcome and program

LAC will implement its new digital business model to improve access to its holdings

Previously committed to

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.3
Subprograms 2.3.1 and 2.3.2

Summary of progress

What progress has been made toward this priority?

LAC achieved its objectives in 2013–2014. It focused on service excellence and developing new tools to help Canadians access their documentary heritage. It also focused on self-service access by improving its reference service as well as online research, and by providing more digital content on its website, such as the 50,000 descriptions added to the Portrait Portal.vii

To offer more digital content online, LAC adopted a strategy to digitize collections that appeal the most to its clients. LAC and its partners digitized over 17 million pages of the collection, that is, more than were digitized in the previous six years combined.

LAC's website is one of the Government of Canada's 10 most popular websites. However, the services provided by its front‑line staff remain central to its commitment to Canadians. In 2013–2014, staff responded to an average of over 8,000 requests each month. 

LAC's service strategy aims to make more digital content available and easier to find by means of new metadata, new hyperlinks and other accepted practices. For this reason, as part of its new approach to describing information resources, LAC adopted the Resource Description and Access (RDA) standard, a new international cataloguing standard applied by documentary heritage institutions to facilitate the description and findability of content.

Priority 4

Type

Strategic outcomes and programs

LAC will advance a collaborative approach to meet the challenges of managing Canada's documentary heritage

Previously committed to

Strategic outcomes 1.0 and 2.0
Programs 1.2, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Summary of progress

What progress has been made toward this priority?

LAC is focusing on collaboration and engagement with its partners to achieve the Government of Canada's priorities and advance documentary heritage management, both in Canada and around the world. In 2013–2014, LAC achieved its objectives under this priority by establishing a number of new partnerships and collaborative agreements. 

For example, LAC participated in projects to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation and the centenary of the First World War. Its participation involved lending items from its collection to various memory institutions—such as the Canadian War Museum and the National Gallery of Canada—while promoting the treasures from its collection to a broader audience.

LAC also signed two major collaborative agreements with Ancestry.caix and Canadiana.org.x Under these agreements, LAC will be able to digitize more content, for example data from the 1921 Census, and make it available online. LAC also undertook a major project with Public Works and Government Services Canada that aims to digitize the 650,000 service files of members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

In support of the Government of Canada's priorities, LAC supported Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by facilitating access to its collection in order to advance research on residential schools. It also worked with Citizenship and Immigration Canada to develop and launch a documentary heritage research guide on the Holocaust, thereby supporting Canada's major role in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

As part of its role to provide support in recordkeeping, LAC signed a memorandum of understanding with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada to support the activities of the Arctic Council. xi

Lastly, LAC continued to develop an integrated and policy-driven approach to support the work carried out in collaboration with various partners and stakeholders. A series of bilateral meetings with key associations and various memory institutions enabled LAC to gain a better understanding of its partners' priorities, share its directions, and discuss documentary heritage management issues.

Priority 5

Type

Strategic outcomes and programs

LAC will acquire the infrastructure and the new skills it needs to manage documentary heritage in the 21st century

Previously committed to

Strategic outcomes 1.0 and 2.0
Program 2.2 and Internal services

Summary of progress

What progress has been made toward this priority?

LAC partly achieved the objectives under this priority. It has been working for a number of years on developing the physical infrastructure needed to preserve documentary heritage in analogue format (in keeping with Program 2.2). To help achieve this goal, LAC adopted a long-term strategy to meet current and future space requirements. The first phase of the strategy involved consolidating part of its collection in the new high-density storage facility so that it would be protected under better storage conditions, and disposing of four out‑of‑date storage facilities.

Information Technology Services also designed tools to take better advantage of what new technologies have to offer. For example, one tool made it possible to automate and streamline the real-time tracking process for new acquisitions. In the coming years, LAC will have to make greater progress in acquiring the technological infrastructure it needs to optimize the way it manages documentary heritage in the 21st century.

LAC also developed a dictionary of the key competencies required for managing documentary heritage. It will be used to establish the list of core competencies needed for each type of position in the organization. (Their development is related to the human resources function, under internal services.) However, the process of developing the competency profiles had to be put on hold because of the adoption of the new Directive on Performance Management. LAC must now analyze which competencies are mandatory under the Directive. The next steps of this project will continue in 2014–2015.

Risk analysis

LAC's Corporate Risk Profile and its 2013–2014 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) focus on four strategic risks that may have a direct impact on achieving the institution's mandate. Here are the risks and the planned mitigation strategies:

Key risks

Risk

Risk response strategy

Link to Program Alignment Architecture

1. Risk that documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

  • Develop an approach based on a documentary heritage evaluation and acquisition policy framework

This mitigation measure was successfully implemented: the key components of the Evaluation and Acquisition Framework were developed and implemented. The framework helps to reduce this risk because it allows LAC to evaluate information resources and acquire content of enduring value, regardless of its format (analogue or digital), form (published or not), or source (public or private).

  • Increase collaboration with other institutions responsible for building Canada's collective memory

This measure was implemented in a targeted fashion to acquire certain information resources. LAC held consultations with publishers in particular as a way to plan future digital acquisitions more effectively. LAC also regularly consults other documentary heritage institutions to discuss potential acquisitions and best practices.

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.1

2. Risk that documentary heritage is not preserved for future generations

  • Maintain essential infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure the long-term preservation of its collections

In 2013–2014, this measure resulted in the completion of a new high-density storage facility. Greater efforts will have to be made in the coming years to preserve LAC's continuously expanding collection, in a sustainable way and under optimal conditions.

The expertise of LAC staff working to preserve documentary heritage (such as conservators and audiovisual technicians) is world-renowned. To maintain proficiency in their field, LAC specialists collaborate and share information with preservation experts in other similar institutions and associations.

  • Develop a long-term infrastructure strategy that will ensure that LAC is strategic in its decision making to meet future preservation needs

A long‑term infrastructure strategy was designed in 2013–2014; its implementation began with the consolidation of spaces dedicated to preserving the documentary heritage under LAC's custody.

  • Continue efforts to digitize the most at‑risk analogue information resources

LAC achieved its performance targets for the audiovisual migration strategy and the migration strategy for unpublished content recorded on outdated digital media.

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.2

3. Risk that documentary heritage is not accessible to Canadians

  • Implement a new digital service model to provide access to more content

LAC created new channels and tools to help Canadians access their documentary heritage. Also, to facilitate self‑service access to its Web resources, it improved its search engines and its reference service. Lastly, LAC developed and began implementing a digitization strategy to provide more content of interest online.

  • Work with partners in the documentary heritage community to provide access to LAC content

LAC signed two major collaborative agreements in 2013–2014 to digitize and make available online a larger part of its collection.
It also collaborated with other memory institutions—such as the Canadian War Museum and the National Gallery of Canada—by lending them items from its collection.

  • Implement a new approach to description so that content is easier to find

LAC continued to implement its new approach to description by adopting the Resource Description and Access (RDA) standard, a new standard applied by documentary heritage institutions to facilitate the description and findability of content.

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.3


4. Risk that Government of Canada information resources are not managed appropriately

  • Develop disposition instruments and recordkeeping tools and help departments manage their information resources

The number of government departments and agencies with comprehensive disposition coverage continued to increase in 2013–2014, with LAC granting 13 new records disposition authorities. LAC is also continuing to provide departments with generic valuation tools to help them with their recordkeeping.

Strategic outcome 1.0
Programs 1.1 and 1.2

Description of the risks

1.  Risk that documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

Given the ever-increasing quantity of information created via digital technologies and the speed at which this information can disappear, LAC runs the risk of not acquiring Canadian documentary heritage of national interest. In fact, the scope of its mandate is such that it may not manage to identify all the content that should be acquired.

2.  Risk that documentary heritage is not preserved for future generations
Once information resources have been acquired, LAC must ensure their physical or digital integrity and their long-term availability. The integrity of the material can be compromised by a variety of external risk factors, such as deterioration over time and with use, and the disuse of technologies needed to consult a format that is outdated. Internal risk factors include the loss of technical expertise and the lack of physical or virtual space offering adequate storage conditions.

3.  Risk that documentary heritage is not accessible to Canadians
Despite advances in technology, a large part of LAC's collection is on paper or other analogue media. The time and effort needed to digitize it, make it easy to find, and then put it online are such that LAC must focus on making accessible the material that is of greatest interest to its clients and to Canadian society.

4.  Risk that Government of Canada information resources are not managed appropriately

The quantity of information created daily in the government poses a considerable challenge when it comes to identifying records that have business, legal or historical value. Sound management of government information is therefore essential—it ensures government accountability and the best possible use of this information to support effective decision making in organizations.

Actual expenditures

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2013–14
Main Estimates

2013–14
Planned spending

2013–14
Total authorities
available for use

2013–14
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Difference
(actual minus planned)

98,346,695

98,346,695

106,300,276

100,803,692

2,456,992

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2013–14
Planned

2013–14
Actual

2013–14
Difference
(actual minus planned)

860

885

25

The gap between the number of planned and actual full-time equivalents (FTEs) is due primarily to the hiring of temporary employees to support the transfer of LAC collections to the new high-density storage facility (Program 2.2: Preservation of continuing memory). In addition, the closing of the Regional Service Centre in Toronto required the hiring of temporary employees to prepare the collections and move them to other storage spaces. As a result, resources dedicated to programs 1.2 (Collaboration in the management of government records) and 2.1 (Documentation of the Canadian experience) were reassigned to take account of organizational priorities.

Budgetary performance summary

The gap between planned spending of $98.3 million (released in the 20132014 Report on Plans and Priorities) and actual spending of $100.8 million is explained as follows. First, LAC received additional funding during the year, including operating and capital budget carry forwards from 2012–2013 to 2013–2014; transfers of authorities from the Treasury Board Secretariat for pay raises under the new collective agreements and for a partial reimbursement of paylist expenditures; and transfers from Public Works and Government Services Canada, which resulted in savings from the consolidation and streamlining of record storage spaces. LAC's total authorities available for fiscal year 2013–2014 therefore amounted to $106.3 million.

The gap between these total authorities and actual spending ($100.8 million) is explained primarily by:

  • operating and capital budget carry forwards from 2012–2013 to 2013–2014, resulting from the project to transform a commercial building in Gatineau, Quebec, into a high‑density collection storage facility;
  • frozen allotments for the personnel conversion factor;
  • frozen allotments for the transfer to Shared Services Canada related to its Workplace Technology Devices initiative.

Budgetary performance summary for strategic outcomes and programs (dollars)

Strategic outcome(s), program(s) and internal services

2013–14
Main Estimates

2013–14
Planned spending

2014–15
Planned spending

2015–16
Planned spending

2013–14     Total authorities available for use

2013–14
Actual spending (authorities used)

2012–13
Actual spending (authorities used)

2011–12
Actual spending (authorities used)

Strategic outcome 1.0: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

Program 1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

3,060,327

3,060,327

3,471,762

3,471,762

3,074,431

2,694,577

1,442,234

2,437,463

Program 1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

7,232,371

7,232,371

7,595,563

7,595,563

8,413,918

8,506,781

6,432,497

8,094,103

Subtotal Strategic outcome 1.0

10,292,698

10,292,698

11,067,325

11,067,325

11,488,349

11,201,358

7,874,731

10,531,566

Strategic outcome 2.0: Canada's continuing memory is documented and made accessible to current and future generations

Program 2.1:  Documentation of the Canadian experience

14,236,034

14,236,034

12,902,706

12,782,706

15,352,127

15,112,669

13,834,998

11,856,684

Program 2.2: Preservation of continuing memory

21,288,244

21,288,244

23,377,784

20,207,784

23,248,034

18,019,293

31,878,165

16,058,161

Program 2.3: Exploration of documentary resources

29,950,151

29,950,151

28,589,912

28,602,632

31,609,536

31,959,088

35,649,520

36,826,141

Subtotal Strategic outcome 2.0

65,474,429

65,474,429

64,870,402

61,593,122

70,209,697

65,091,050

81,362,683

64,740,986

Internal services Subtotal

22,579,568

22,579,568

19,927,061

19,927,061

24,602,230

24,511,284

29,685,818

​36,748,811

Total

98,346,695

98,346,695

95,864,788

92,587,508

106,300,276

100,803,692

118,923,232

112,021,363

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of 2013–14 actual spending with the whole-of-government framework xii (dollars)

Strategic outcome

Program

Spending area

Government of Canada outcome

2013-14 Actual spending

1. Current government information is managed to support government accountability

1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

2,694,577

1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

8,506,781

2. Canada's continuing memory is documented and made accessible to current and future generations

2.1: Documentation of the Canadian experience

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

15,112,669

2.2: Preservation of continuing memory

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

18,019,293

2.3: Exploration of documentary resources

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

31,959,088

Total spending by spending area (dollars)

Spending area

Total planned spending

Total actual spending

Economic Affairs

0

0

Social Affairs

65,474,429

65,091,050

International Affairs

0

0

Government Affairs

10,292,698

11,201,358

Departmental spending trend

Departmental spending trend graph 

 

 

 

The above chart illustrates the spending trend of Library and Archives Canada (LAC), in millions of dollars and by total expenditure, over a six‑year period from 2011–2012 to 2016–2017 (that is, three fiscal years of actual spending and three fiscal years of planned spending).

LAC's total spending will decrease to $92.6 million beginning in 2015–2016. The fluctuation is primarily due to the following factors:
  • The lower spending begun in 2012–2013 will continue until 2014–2015. Total ongoing savings of $9.6 million will be achieved as a result of Economic Action Plan 2012.
  • The collection storage facility project will be completed in 2014–2015. LAC will then have received $32.4 million (from 2009–2010 to 2014–2015) to convert a commercial building in Gatineau, Quebec, into a collection storage facility with a high-density shelving system. Spending for this project peaked in 2012–2013 when most of the major construction work was being carried out.
  • The higher spending begun in 2012–2013 is due to the transfers made by Public Works and Government Services Canada because of savings achieved by consolidating and merging record storage buildings, as well as the reimbursement stemming from lower accommodation requirements. As a result, beginning in 2014–2015, planned spending at LAC will have increased by $5 million.

Estimates by vote

For information on LAC's organizational votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.xiii

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