Materiel Services

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How to use this tool:

  • This tool is designed for IM specialists to use with relevant business areas when identifying information resources of business value (IRBV) and retention specifications.
  • The IRBV and retention specifications contained in this document are recommendations only and should be customized to apply in each institutional context. The complete document should be read before using any recommendations.
  • This Generic Valuation Tool does not provide Government of Canada institutions with the authority to dispose of information. Generic Valuation Tools (GVT) are not Records Disposition Authorities (RDA) and do not replace the Multi-Institutional Disposition Authorities (MIDA).

Validation: The business processes and IRBV of this GVT have been validated by subject matter experts from: Treasury Board Secretariat Materiel Management Working Group, which includes employees of approximately 20 Government of Canada institutions.

Defining the Activity

Materiel Services has been identified as an Internal Service as part of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s (TBS) Profile of Government of Canada Internal Services (archived). Footnote1 It is one of the three sub-sub-activities comprising the Asset Management sub-activity, the two others being Real Property Services and Acquisition Services. Thus, Materiel Services is  identified at the sub-sub-activity level of the Profile and is common across the Government of Canada (GC), based on various pieces of legislation and TBS policy instruments.

Materiel Services is framed by a number of legislative, regulatory and policy instruments, including the Financial Administration Act, the Defence Production Act, the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act, the Policy Framework for the Management of Assets and Acquired Services andthe Policy on Management of Materiel. There are also legislation and policy instruments that frame the management of specific materiel, Footnote2 control hazardous materiel, Footnote3and regulate the loans of materiel and management of surplus materiel. Footnote4

Materiel Services involves activities undertaken to ensure that materiel can be managed by departments in a sustainable and financially responsible manner that supports the cost-effective and efficient delivery of government programs. Materiel is defined as all movable assets, excluding money and records, acquired by Her Majesty in right of Canada. Materiel Services entails all activities necessary to acquire, hold, use and dispose of materiel, including the notion of achieving the greatest possible efficiency throughout the life cycle of materiel assets. Footnote5 Acquisition related activities will not be dealt with in this tool, but rather in the Acquisitions Services GVT.

Materiel Services is defined by the TBS Internal Services Profile and does not include strategic and/or horizontal activities related to materiel services performed on behalf of the entire GC, such as those carried out by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), the TBS, or the Department of National Defence. It also excludes the management of materiel as part of an operational activity performed by specifically mandated GC institutions (e.g., the management of collections by museums).

Relationship to Other GVT

Business processes often overlap. When the IRBV for a sub-activity is also identified in another GVT, there is a note in the table of IRBV and retention recommendations (below) to direct the user to the proper tool.

The materiel management activity is related to many other common GC-wide activities and business processes, so this GVT should be applied in conjunction with other GVTs.

Acquisition Services and Real Property Services: Materiel Services complements the other internal services described in the Asset Management Services suite. Real Property Services deals with fixed or immovable assets while Acquisition Services deals with the acquisition/procurement process component of asset management. Each of these asset management services is addressed in separate GVTs.

Financial Management Services: Acquiring materiel assets may involve functions, tasks, or activities related to the financial management or the Comptrollership of financial transactions as documented by contracts, purchase orders, or other financial records. The business processes and IRBVs are addressed in the Financial Management Services GVT.

Management and Oversight: All policy and procedures related to materiel management are addressed in the Management and Oversight GVT.

Human Resources Management: Acquiring materiel assets may involve functions, tasks, or activities related to human resources management. The business processes and IRBVs are addressed in the Human Resources Management GVT.

Legal Services: Acquiring materiel assets may involve functions, tasks, or activities related to legal services. The business processes and IRBVs are addressed in the Legal Services GVT.

Business Processes

While the sub-activities for Materiel Services were drawn from the Guide to Management of Materiel, Footnote6 which takes into consideration the legislative, regulatory and policy instruments mentioned above, business processes were taken from LAC’s Retention Guidelines for Common Administrative Records of the Government of Canada Footnote7as well as LAC’s Business Activity Structure Classification System (BASCS) Guidance for Materiel Management Function Model. Footnote8Materiel Services is hence broken down into four phases, or sub-activities:

Assessment and planning

Although it is part of Materiel Services, this sub-activity will be dealt with in the Acquisition Services GVT as these sub-activities take place in advance of delivery.

Assessing requirements: Evaluating existing assets and resources; assessing current and future organizational needs, and reviewing alternative means of satisfying materiel needs; monitoring and providing feedback on the implementation and effectiveness of Materiel Service policies; promoting the acceptance and use of environmentally sound products and practices; ensuring that Materiel Services complies with institutional policies and standards; and ensuring the effective and efficient management of all inventories and inventory cost distribution. 

Planning materiel requirement: Developing purchasing strategies; participating in procurement strategy reviews, short-term and long-term logistics planning, and life-cycle costing of acquisition alternatives; coordinating the development of materiel and logistics objectives and operational plans; and keeping inventories of materiel purchasing and holding costs.

Acquisition

Although it is part of Materiel Services, this sub-activity will be dealt with in the Acquisition Services GVT as these sub-activities take place in advance of delivery.

Purchase, contract, lease, make, buy, reuse, select and order products, in addition to moving, shipping, and storing them.

Operations and maintenance

All the following sub-activities take place once the materiel has been delivered.

1. Operating materiel assets:

Includes such processes as receiving and inspecting assets; controlling inventory; and warehousing. It pertains to the development and implementation of measures to ensure that materiel is used to the fullest extent possible and is well protected.

Also includes such processes as assigning/allocating assets, monitoring and reviewing use; using assets; loaning assets; and securing assets. It pertains to the distribution and scheduling of the use of materiel assets based on operational needs; redistributing materiel within the institution; tracking materiel assets (i.e., keeping track of materiel in use, loaned or transferred, monitoring the condition, quantity, consumption, rate of use, loss and associated costs).

2. Maintaining materiel assets:

Ensures that all movable goods are properly maintained and used to extend the service life of the product. It pertains to the scheduling and performing of inspections testing and maintenance work, and carrying out corrective maintenance and repairs.

3. Disposal of government assets

Disposal:
Involves identifying the disposable asset; identifying the appropriate method of disposal; and disposing of and writing-off materiel.
Replacing:
Involves the replacement of items, or parts of an item, and leads back to the “assessment and planning” and “acquisition” processes.

Retention

Recommended retention specifications in GVTs are determined based on traditional or best practices, a review of government-wide legislation and policy, and validation with subject matter experts. Retention periods are suggestions only; departments must take into account their own legislative requirements and business needs.

The retention recommendations were taken from different sources, namely the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, the Maritime Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, the Marine Personnel Regulations, the National Joint Council (NJC) Occupational Health and Safety Directive, the Policy on Accounting for Inventories, the Directive on Disposal of Surplus Materiel, the Guide to the Management of Movable Heritage Assets, and the Guide to Management of Materiel.

Business Value and Retention Recommendations

Note: For assessing, planning and acquiring materiel resources, see the GVT for Acquisition Services.

1. Operating

Business Processes Recommendations: Information Resources of Business Value (IRBVs) Recommendations: Retention Period

Receipt and inspection of assets

Stock/goods receiving and inspection

Entry into asset management database

Barcoding

Annotated packing slip, way-bill, delivery paperwork, bill of lading

Verification against contract/purchase order specifications

Correspondence regarding non-compliance/discrepancy of delivery

Internal inspection reports, photographs

Claims for damage

Tracking records for partial shipments

Contractual remedies/sanctions in the case of non-compliance

Quality Assurance/Technical testing reports

Record of asset details in asset management database

Note: The Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Regulations, Part 3, specifies the content of shipping records relating to dangerous goods.
2 years after last administrative use

Inventory control

Identify assets to be inventoried

Perform inventory

Monitor inventory

Asset management database

Reports on missing assets

Note: The Controlled Goods Directive specifies the content of inventory records relating to controlled goods.
1 year after superseded or obsolete
Reports of asset write-offs sent to Finance 6 years after end of fiscal year in which the assets are disposed of, in reference to Policy on Accounting for Inventories, s.1.1.1, and Guide to Management of Materiel, s. 4

Warehousing

Identify items stored
Identify shelf life of each item

Identify and implement protective measures

Documents regarding issuing of materiel
Forecasting plans
Average usage reports
Order quantity determinations

Note: For IRBVs about training or disciplinary action (in relation to the safe handling or theft of assets), see the GVT – Human Resources Management.
1 year after superseded or obsolete

Warehousing controlled goods

Identify items stored
Identify shelf life of each item
Identify and implement     
protective measures

(see also the activity “Warehousing” above)

Additional IRBVs requirements specific to controlled goods (as defined by the Defence Production Act, Schedule – Controlled Goods List—in reference to A Guide to Canada's Export Controls—and Controlled Goods Directive,
s. 4)

Security assessments and supporting documentation

Security plan

Correspondence with the Minister with respect to any security breaches

Visitor orientation documents concerning the safe handling of controlled goods

1 year after superseded or obsolete

Warehousing controlled products (hazardous goods)

Identify items stored
Identify shelf life of each item
Identify and implement     
protective measures

(see also the activity “Warehousing” above)

Additional IRBV requirements specific to controlled products (hazardous goods) (as defined by the Hazardous Products Act, Schedule II, in reference to Controlled Products Regulations, s. 33 – 66, and TDG Regulations, Schedule 1)

Register of hazardous/dangerous goods
Permits, authorization documents
Packing slip, way-bill, delivery paperwork, transportation manifest (including shipping records)
Shipping discrepancy reports
Site storage plan
Accident response plan
WHMIS and OHS training records

1 year after superseded or obsolete

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
MSDS stickers
MSDS binders

Until superseded or the controlled product is disposed of

Note: Retention of MSDS information resources relating to controlled products – as defined by Canada Occupational Health and Safety (COHS) Regulations, s. 10.31 (1) and Maritime Occupational Health and Safety (MOHS) Regulations, s. 259 – is based on COHS Regulations, s. 10.32 (3) and MOHS Regulations, s. 262 and 263.

Warehousing heritage assets

Identify items stored
Identify shelf life of each item
Identify and implement     
Protective measures determine the value of the heritage asset

(see also the activity “Warehousing” above)

Heritage assessment survey, value determination
Item-specific correspondence
Entry into movable asset inventory system flagging heritage asset

Heritage value/significance assessment (details on object, acquisition date, reference manuals, photographs of it in use, research on items of similar type, oral histories of use, etc.)

1 year after the item is removed from the inventory

Note: Retain copies of the item’s documentation near the items as well as in a central information bank (Guide to the Management of Movable Heritage Assets, s. 2.3)
Conservation plan if item is still in use (asset conservation management plan) 5 years after superseded or obsolete, based on traditional retention practice applied to policies and procedures

Assignment/allocation of assets

Stock issue and distribution

Usage validations

Framework documents demonstrating the link between the assets and program needs/mandate – see Management and Oversight GVT
Correspondence (request)
Documents surrounding licences/permits (permits, registration)
Sign-out log/sheets

Note: The TDG Regulations, Part 3, specify the content of shipping records relating to dangerous goods.
2 years after last administrative action
Monitor and review use

Reports submitted to Senior Management and Finance
Performance measure evaluations
Benchmarking reports
Feasibility studies
Loss investigation reports

6 years after end of fiscal year in which the evaluations, studies and reports are submitted

Use of assets (on- and off-site)

Instruction manuals
Incident logs/reports
Removal from premises forms, sign-out sheets
Teleworking forms
Log books, vehicle log (mileage loads, load details)
Fleet management system, fleet database
Use authorization form
Proof of insurance/government indemnification

2 years after last administrative action, except:

1 year after the report is signed – reports of inspection, testing or maintenance work performed in relation to motorized or manual materials handling equipment, based on COHS Regulations, s. 14.20

5 years after date of equipment inspection, testing, maintenance and calibration – records of inspection, testing, maintenance and calibration of diving equipment used by employees, based on COHS Regulations, s. 18.41 and 18.42

5 years after the day on which the log book was completed or the day on which a change is made in registration of the vessel – official log books of Canadian vessels of 100 gross tonnes or more, based on Marine Personnel Regulations, s. 340. (5)

6 years after the end of the fiscal year in which expenditures are made – financial records related to operation, e.g., repairs, receipts for fuel purchases

6 years after the end of the fiscal year in which the materiel asset is disposed of – financial records related to operation, e.g., records of credit cards issued in relation to vehicles, records pertaining to insurance and liability

30 years after the date of application – records of pesticide application, based on the NJC Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Directive, s. 10.24.1

As long as the equipment is in use – instructions for the inspection, testing and maintenance of materials handling equipment, based on COHS Regulations, s. 14.20

Note: For retention requirements relating to training in the use of materiel assets and health and safety incidents arising from their use, see the GVT – Human Resources Management.
Hazardous occurrence reports (reports of investigations into the likelihood that the health or safety of an employee in a workplace is or may be endangered by exposure to a hazardous substance) 30 years after the date on which the qualified person signed the report, based on COHS Regulations, s. 10.6

Loan of an asset to an external organization

Note: Follow practices established by the Public Property Loan Regulations

Asset loan agreement
Contracts, agreements, Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) (see also the GVT – Legal Services)

Correspondence between participants (i.e., lenders, borrowers, legal counsel)
1 year after return or disposal of asset
Activities taken to secure assets against theft, damage and deterioration

Threat and risk assessment

Security logs/inspection reports/incident reports
5 years after last administrative action

2. Maintaining

Business Processes Recommendations: Information Resources of Business Value (IRBVs) Recommendations: Retention Period

Maintaining

Unplanned maintenance

Planned or scheduled maintenance

Preventative maintenance

Betterments

Inspection records
Testing records
Maintenance and repair records
Maintenance agreements
Annual certification

2 years, or 1 year after disposal of equipment, except:

2 years after the date of inspection – records of inspection and maintenance of anchor points and permanently installed suspended platforms, based on COHS Regulations, s. 2.16 (8)

2 years after the inspection record is signed – records of inspections of a “person’s transfer apparatus,” based on MOHS Regulations, s. 136. (2)(d)

2 years after the apparatus ceases to be used – records of self-contained breathing apparatus provided by the employer, based on MOHS Regulations, s. 148

2 years after the report is signed – reports of inspection, test and maintenance of materials handling equipment, based on MOHS Regulations, s. 227

3 years after the day of the inspection – records of inspections required by MOHS Regulations, s. 62
3 years after disposal of vehicle – records of routine vehicle maintenance and repair

5 years after the date of the report – reports of inspection, testing, cleaning and maintenance operation for Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, based on COHS Regulations, s. 2.24 (5)

10 years after repairs – records of vehicle repairs or replacements resulting from accidents, based on NJC OHS Directive, s. 16.7.2

as long as anchor points and permanently installed suspended platforms are used – records of modifications or repairs made to them, based on COHS Regulations, s. 2.16 (8)

Note: The MOHS Regulations specify that the records referenced above—in relation to those regulations—are to be retained “on board the vessel.”

Maintaining Protective Equipment

Unplanned maintenance
Planned or scheduled maintenance
Preventative maintenance
Betterments

Records of protection equipment (i.e., safety materials, equipment, devices and clothing) provided by the employer

Note: The COHS Regulations, s. 12.14 (2), specify the content of these records; the MOHS Regulations, s. 95, specify what is to be inspected.

2 years after the equipment ceases to be used, based on COHS Regulations, s. 12.14 (1) and MOHS Regulations,
s. 148. (1), except:

2 years after the inspection record is signed by the person who carried out the inspection – records of inspections required by MOHS Regulations, s. 95
Note: According to the COHS Regulations, s. 12.14 (1), records of all inspections are to be retained until 2 years after the equipment ceases to be used.

Note: The regulations noted above specify, respectively, that the records are to be retained “in the workplace in which the equipment is located” or “on board the vessel.”
Maintaining Heritage Assets

Additional IRBV requirements specific to heritage assets (as defined by the Guide to the Management of Movable Heritage Assets, Appendix B)

Documentation of maintenance or restoration work

Conservation treatment documents (before and after photos, treatment plan, reports on results of treatment)

1 year after the item is removed from the inventory

Note: Retain copies of the item’s documentation near the items as well as in a central information bank (Guide to the Management of Movable Heritage Assets, s. 2.3).

3. Disposal

Note: The disposal of most assets goes through Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) – Crown Assets Distribution (CAD); see Treasury Board Secretariat Directive on Disposal of Surplus Materiel, s. 4.

Business Processes Recommendations: Information Resources of Business Value (IRBVs) Recommendations: Retention Period

Disposal

Notify CAD that materiel is available for disposal

Offer to Industry Canada Computers for Schools Program (IT only)

Contact Library and Archives Canada for all surplus publications

Make materiel available to other federal departments

Amend asset management database to reflect disposal of asset

Dispose of outside the federal domain after all other possibilities have been considered
Lists of surplus assets (available for reuse within the institution or available for other government institutions) 1 year after superseded or obsolete

Correspondence with CAD
Disposal forms

Report of Surplus (ROS)
1 year after surplus declaration to CAD
Condemnation and destruction document 1 year after disposal

Write-offs
Sales documents
Surplus document
Donation documents

Additional IRBV requirements specific to controlled goods (as defined by the Defence Production Act, Schedule – Controlled Goods List—in reference to A Guide to Canada's Export Controls —and the Controlled Goods Directive, s. 4)
Documents outlining the description of transfer, the date of transfer, the identity and address to whom the controlled goods were transferred
Description of the manner and date of disposition

Additional IRBV requirements specific to controlled products (hazardous goods) (as defined by the Hazardous Products Act, Schedule II, in reference to Controlled Products Regulations, s. 33 – 66, and TDG Regulations, Schedule 1)
Hazardous waste control forms, shipping logs
Shipping permits
Note: The TDG Regulations, Part 3, specifies the content of shipping records relating to dangerous goods.

Additional IRBV requirements specific to heritage assets (as defined by the Guide to the Management of Movable Heritage Assets, Appendix B)
Correspondence with museum or similar institution for transfer of asset

Cultural Property Export Review Board correspondence
1 year after disposal, sale, or donation

Reports of asset disposal sent to Finance

Costing analyses used to justify disposal decisions

6 years after the end of the fiscal year in which the disposal takes place, in reference to: Policy on Accounting for Inventories, s. 1.1.1; Directive on Disposal of Surplus Materiel, s. 4.11; and Guide to Management of Materiel, s. 4

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