On the Road to 2017 with LAC - The French Experience – Canada’s Contribution to the First World War

Transcript

Video Length: 1:44

On-camera starts at 0:11

(Richard Provencher is standing in the Collection Reference Room at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa)

Richard Provencher: Welcome to this new episode of On the Road to 2017 with Library and Archives Canada.

Richard Provencher: Generally, when we talk about the First World War, we do so from a national perspective.

Richard Provencher: In other words, we are interested in what role Canada played in the Great War.

(Various pictures in black and white of Canadian soldiers sitting in a trench, walking away from a battlefield, helping a fallen soldier, advancing with a tank on a battlefield)

Richard Provencher: Yet, behind the Canadian military experience is the true nature of the First World War, that of coalition warfare.

(A screen shot of LAC’s First World War webpage, a picture in black and white of French soldiers on horses, and a picture in black and white of Canadian and French soldiers resting around a German gun)

Richard Provencher: As such, the collections of Library and Archives Canada attest to the “French presence” in Canada’s modern warfare learning process.

(A picture in black and white of French soldiers in a carriage passing a damaged tank, and a picture in black and white of French troops accepting cigarettes from Canadian soldiers)

Martin Laberge: France, as a great military power, played a key role in the Canadian search for solutions to problems encountered on the Western Front.

(Dr. Martin Laberge, Professor of History of International Relations, Department of Social Sciences, Université du Québec en Outaouais, is standing in front of the main staircase at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa)

Martin Laberge: You will find at Library and Archives Canada documents that cover such topics as the visits of Canadian troops to French units, of training, and also of lessons learned from French battles, such as the Battle of Verdun in 1916.

(Screen shot of the “Battle of the Somme” results in LAC’s archive search engine)

Richard Provencher: As always, take a look at our online content!

(Richard is standing in the Collection Reference Room, and a screen shot the Videos section of LAC’s website)

Richard Provencher: And remember, follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and visit the Videos section of our website view the entire video series online.

(Screen shows the web address and social networking pages of Library and Archives Canada, Facebook, and Twitter)

Social media addresses: Facebook, Twitter

Audio ends at 1:39

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