ARCHIVED - Exhibition launched by LAC and the Hockey Hall of Fame celebrates the military ties of the First World War to the game of hockey

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On November 10, 2014, the Hockey Hall of Fame, in partnership with Library and Archives Canada (LAC), opened a new exhibition entitled Hockey Marching As To War: The First World War and A Century of Military Ties to the Game.

Through a display of artifacts, maps, posters, graphics, and interactive stations, the exhibition highlights the impact of the Great War on the game of hockey and its players.

Distinguished guests at the opening included Hockey Hall of Fame inductees Johnny Bower and Leonard “Red” Kelly, and the Librarian and Archivist of Canada Guy Berthiaume.

The exhibition is open to the public until February 2016.

"At Library and Archives Canada, we are very proud to be contributing to many of the commemoration activities organized by the Government of Canada which recognize the contributions and the sacrifices made by Canadians between 1914 and 1918," said Librarian and Archivist of Canada Guy Berthiaume while addressing the media before the opening of the exhibition.
"At Library and Archives Canada, we are very proud to be contributing to many of the commemoration activities organized by the Government of Canada which recognize the contributions and the sacrifices made by Canadians between 1914 and 1918," said Librarian and Archivist of Canada Guy Berthiaume while addressing the media before the opening of the exhibition.

Librarian and Archivist of Canada Guy Berthiaume, Hockey Hall of Famers Johnny Bower and Leonard “Red” Kelly, Library and Archives Canada curator Carolyn Cook, Hockey Hall of Fame Vice-President and curator Phil Pritchard, and Hockey Hall of Fame Director of Public Relations Ron Ellis pose in front of the Memorial Cup. The trophy, which is awarded annually to Canada’s best junior hockey team, also pays tribute to Canadian hockey players who died serving in the Great War.
Librarian and Archivist of Canada Guy Berthiaume, Hockey Hall of Famers Johnny Bower and Leonard "Red" Kelly, Library and Archives Canada curator Carolyn Cook, Hockey Hall of Fame Vice-President and curator Phil Pritchard, and Hockey Hall of Fame Director of Public Relations Ron Ellis pose in front of the Memorial Cup. The trophy, which is awarded annually to Canada’s best junior hockey team, also pays tribute to Canadian hockey players who died serving in the Great War.

Former Toronto Maple Leafs hockey greats and Hockey Hall of Famers Johnny Bower and  Red Kelly pose for the cameras in front of the exhibition <em>Hockey Marching As To War… .</em> Bower, a Second World War veteran, won  four Stanley Cups as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs. Kelly won eight  Stanley Cups as a member of the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Former Toronto Maple Leafs hockey greats and Hockey Hall of Famers Johnny Bower and Red Kelly pose for the cameras in front of the exhibition Hockey Marching As To War… . Bower, a Second World War veteran, won four Stanley Cups as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs. Kelly won eight Stanley Cups as a member of the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs.

The contributions of LAC include reproductions of photographs, maps and posters as well as copies of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Attestation Papers and service files of over 30 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees.
The contributions of LAC include reproductions of photographs, maps and posters as well as copies of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Attestation Papers and service files of over 30 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees.

When men enlisted and headed for Europe during the First World War, women got their first chance to play professional hockey. The exhibition includes a reproduction of LAC’s photographic portrait of Eva Ault. Nicknamed the "Queen of the Ice," Ault became an instant star and fan favorite.
When men enlisted and headed for Europe during the First World War, women got their first chance to play professional hockey. The exhibition includes a reproduction of LAC’s photographic portrait of Eva Ault. Nicknamed the "Queen of the Ice," Ault became an instant star and fan favorite.

To commemorate the centennial anniversary of the start of the war, LAC contributed copies of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Attestation Papers and service files of over 30 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees. Curator Carolyn Cook looks at one of these files at one of the four interactive stations furnished by LAC for the exhibition.
To commemorate the centennial anniversary of the start of the war, LAC contributed copies of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Attestation Papers and service files of over 30 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees. Curator Carolyn Cook looks at one of these files at one of the four interactive stations furnished by LAC for the exhibition.

One of the highlights of the Hockey Hall of Fame is the Esso Great Hall, home to all major National Hockey League trophies including the Stanley Cup. Inside, double glass walls hold portraits and biographical sketches of every member of the Hockey Hall of Fame. As part of this exhibition, the plaques of all Honoured Members who served in the military are adorned with a commemorative red ribbon.
One of the highlights of the Hockey Hall of Fame is the Esso Great Hall, home to all major National Hockey League trophies including the Stanley Cup. Inside, double glass walls hold portraits and biographical sketches of every member of the Hockey Hall of Fame. As part of this exhibition, the plaques of all Honoured Members who served in the military are adorned with a commemorative red ribbon.

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