ARCHIVED - Official Opening of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

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On September 19, 2014, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights officially opened in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Library and Archives Canada played a prominent role loaning 11 items from its vaults to showcase to museum visitors. Among the items is the Canadian Bill of Rights and the 1982 Proclamation of the Constitution Act.

 

Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, examines the Canadian Bill of Rights on loan from Library and Archives Canada to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, prior to the document being installed in one of the museum’s ten permanent galleries.

Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, examines the Canadian Bill of Rights on loan from Library and Archives Canada to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, prior to the document being installed in one of the museum’s ten permanent galleries.

 

At the entrance, a giant display greets visitors—leaving no doubt as to what they are about to experience.

At the entrance, a giant display greets visitors—leaving no doubt as to what they are about to experience.

 

An imposing 74-square metre blanket made of hand-pressed clay beads and reflecting the concepts of earth, water and sky hangs in the museum’s Indigenous Perspectives gallery.

An imposing 74-square metre blanket made of hand-pressed clay beads and reflecting the concepts of earth, water and sky hangs in the museum’s Indigenous Perspectives gallery.

 

An architectural marvel, these alabaster-clad passageways crisscross the galleries as visitors ascend to the top level.

An architectural marvel, these alabaster-clad passageways crisscross the galleries as visitors ascend to the top level.

 

In the largest gallery, “Canadian Journeys,” a digital canvas relays Canadian stories across a 96-foot screen.

In the largest gallery, “Canadian Journeys,” a digital canvas relays Canadian stories across a 96-foot screen.

 

Among the museum’s many galleries, this one, “Examining the Holocaust,” is prominently featured.

Among the museum’s many galleries, this one, “Examining the Holocaust,” is prominently featured.

 

Using cutting-edge, touch-based digital technology, this gallery offers visitors a chance to study the mass atrocities that have taken place throughout the world.

Using cutting-edge, touch-based digital technology, this gallery offers visitors a chance to study the mass atrocities that have taken place throughout the world.

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