List of Fonds and Collections

The entries in the alphabetical list below are fonds-level records — descriptions for the body of records that come from a single creator (a "creator" meaning an individual (such as an author), one or more families, or an administrative body (such as a literary press).

Finding aids are available for many fonds. The staff of the Literary Archives can forward copies of finding aids, preliminary inventories and other resources in order to answer questions for interested researchers.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Acorn, Milton

  • Alonzo, Anne-Marie

    Anne-Marie Alonzo fonds. - 1966-1994. - 8 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch : Author, editor and journalist Anne-Marie Alonzo was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1951 and has lived in Quebec since she was 12 years old. She obtained a Ph.D. in French studies from the Université de Montréal in 1986. In addition to contributing to the periodicals La Nouvelle Barre du jour, Possibles, Des Femmes en mouvement and Spirale, her publications include Geste (1979), Blanc de thé (1983), Une Lettre rouge, orange et ocre (1984), French Conversation (1986), Bleus de mine (1985), Nous en reparlerons sans doute (1986), Écoute, Sultane (1987), Seul le désir (1987) and Galia qu'elle nommait amour : un conte (1992). She founded the Auto/Graphe theatre company (with Myrianne Pavlovic and Mona Latif-Ghattas) in 1981, the poetry and literary journals Estuaire and Trois (with Richard Boutin and Alain Laframboise) in 1985-86, and A.M.A., a talking books firm of which she is the director. Her collection, Bleus de mine, won the Prix Émile-Nelligan in 1985 (an award for young poets), and was also shortlisted for the Governor General's Literary Award. Her novel Galia qu'elle nommait amour won the Grand prix d'excellence artistique de Laval in 1992. She was awarded the Ville de Laval medal in 1997, made a Member of the Order of Canada in 1996 and received a bronze medal from the Société Arts-Sciences-Lettres de Paris in April 1997.

    Scope and Content: The Anne-Marie Alonzo fonds contains typescripts and drafts of poems and other published or unpublished texts covering the period from 1966 to 1994; business or personal correspondence with Jovette Marchessault, Mary Meigs, Marie-Claire Blais, Rina Lasnier and Alice Parizeau, among others; and press clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in a number of accessions between 1986 and 1995. [1986-07, 1987-11, 1993-04, 1994-02, 1995-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available for some accessions.

  • Amabile, George

    George Amabile fonds. - [1968]-[1985]. - 2 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, short-story writer and editor, George Amabile was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, in 1936, and studied at the University of Conneticut (Ph.D., 1969). The early part of his literary career concentrated primarily on poetry and the four books published in the 1960s and 1970s by Canada's small presses were well received. These culminated in The Presence of Fire (1982) which was awarded the Canadian Authors'Association Silver Medal for Poetry in 1983. Amabile founded and edited the Far Point (1968-1973), edited Northern Light, and two poetry journals; and he co-edited an anthology of poems about Louis Riel No Feather, No Ink: After Riel (1985). Currently Amabile is a Professor of English at the University of Manitoba.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains literary papers created by George Amabile since the early 1950s and documents an important period in Canada's literary history, especially for the Western region of Canada. The fonds includes the complete collection of his poetry worksheets, manuscripts and typescripts of poetry and short fiction; personal and professional correspondence received as editor of the Far Point and Northern Light; correspondence with contemporary Canadian poets and writers E.D. Blodgett, D.G. Jones, Ralph Gustafson, Al Purdy, Patrick Lane, Susan Musgrave, Douglas Burnett, Doug Fetherling, J. Michael Yates, Elizabeth Woods, John Newlove, Kevin Roberts; filmscript and unpublished novel The Survivor; Ph.D. thesis; and works by other writers.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from George Amabile in 1990. [1990-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: brief listing available.

  • Amtmann, Airdrie

    Airdrie Amtmann fonds. - 1976-1980. - 13 cm of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch : Illustrator Airdrie Anne Amtmann (now Thomsen) was born in Montreal, Quebec. She studied illustration at the Banff School of Fine Arts (with William Townsend), the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts School of Art and Design (with Guido Molinari and Arthur Lismer) and at The Parsons School/New School for Social Research in New York (with Maurice Sendak) in 1976. Her first published book was The Stars in the Sky: A Scottish Tale (1979). Her second book The Gift Angel was published in 1987. She has also studied dance and performed with the Toronto Dance Theatre and Les Grands Ballets canadiens. She creates calligraphy and works styled after traditional Tibetan documents.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes correspondence with the publisher, manuscripts, working drawings, typescripts and proofs, with a detailed description of how The Stars in the Sky was made including the illustrator's comments on the drawings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Airdrie Anne Amtmann in 1983. [1983-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Amtmann, Bernard

    Bernard Amtmann fonds. - 1949-1979. - 29.5 m of textual record and other materials.

    Biographical Sketch: Bernard Amtmann, antiquarian bookseller, bibliographer, publisher and founder of Montreal Book Auctions (1967) and the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Canada (1966), was born in Vienna, Austria in 1907. Amtmann immigrated to Canada in 1947 to join his brother William Amtmann in Ottawa where he started a small antiquarian bookselling business, issuing his first catalogue by 1948. He transferred his business to Montreal in 1950 and began to specialize in Canadiana. In 1967 Amtmann founded Montreal Book Auctions Ltd. to further promote Canadiana. Following Amtmann's death in January 1979, Montreal Book Auctions was sold to Canada Book Auctions Ltd. and relocated to Toronto.

    Bernard Amtmann was the moving force behind the foundation of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Canada in 1966 and served as its first president. He made a significant contribution to the field of Canadian bibliography, publishing a number of bibliographies and bibliographic tools, most notably his four-volume Contributions to a Short-Title Catalogue of Canadiana (1971-1973), The Arctic Bibliography and Contributions to a Dictionary of Canadian Pseudonyms (1973).

    Scope and Content: The Bernard Amtmann fonds includes correspondence, manuscripts and typescripts of catalogues, lectures, the bibliographies, research notes, papers relating to the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Canada and the Erasmus Circle of Montreal, personal papers, photographs and ephemera. The Université de Montréal accession [1993-03] includes the commercial archives of the Montreal Book Auctions, correspondence, financial records, catalogues and client files for the period 1948 to 1979.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: First accession acquired from Bernard Amtmann with additional accessions from Robert Gordon in 1988, from his sister, Johanna Lamberger in 1989; and from Université de Montréal in 1993. [1976-01, 1988-09, 1989-01, 1993-03]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some files restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first accession; box list available for the Université de Montréal accession.

  • Amtmann Circle

    Amtmann Circle fonds. - 1979-1989. - 1 m of textual record.

    Administrative History: The Amtmann Circle was founded in 1979 to honour the memory of Bernard Amtmann (1907-1979), founding president of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Canada, a man who devoted more than 30 years of his life to the identification, description, study and understanding of Canadian books, pamphlets, manuscripts and ephemera. The objective of the Amtmann Circle was to encourage scholarship in the fields of Canadian history and bibliography, antiquarian book collecting and selling. The Amtmann Circle was dissolved in 1989.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes research notes, drafts of manuscripts, corrected proofs and correspondence for the Amtmann Circle publication Bernard Amtmann, 1907-1979: A Personal Memoir, by John Archer and John Mappin. The second accession, received in 1994 contains the business records of the organization.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The first accession was acquired from John Mappin in 1986, and the second accession from Sandra Alston in 1994. [1989-06, 1994-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Anderson, Patrick John McAllister

  • Anderson-Dargatz, Gail

    Gail Anderson-Dargatz fonds. - 1987-1998. - 3.86 m. of textual record. - 1 photograph.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Kamloops, British Columbia in 1963, Gail Anderson-Dargatz is a novelist and short-story writer who grew up in the Shuswap region of rural British Columbia. After beginning her career as a journalist, Gail Anderson-Dargatz enrolled in the creative writing program at the University of Victoria where she studied with Jack Hodgins. She went on to receive a B.A. in creative writing in 1998 having already received nominations for a number of prominent awards for fiction.

    Gail Anderson-Dargatz draws on details of rural life and on events in her own life or the lives of others when creating her works of fiction: in particular The Miss Hereford Stories and her two popular novels The Cure for Death By Lightning and A Recipe for Bees. In keeping with her roots as a reporter, much of the background work of her fiction is based on personal interviews.

    Anderson-Dargatz won the CBC Radio Literary Awards First Prize for Short Fiction (1993) for her story "The Girl with the Bell Necklace;" she was short-listed for the Stephen Leacock Award (1995) for The Miss Hereford Stories. For her novel The Cure for Death By Lightning she won the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, the VanCity Book Award and the Betty Trask Prize for best novel by an author under 35: the book was also short-listed for the Giller Prize (1996) and the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award. Her work has been translated into many languages including German, French, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Spanish, Italian, Greek and Japanese. Her work has been published in English in Canada, Britain and the United States.

    Scope and Content: This archival fonds documents Anderson-Dargatz' early writing, her submissions to publish, her revisions as a student as well as her swift success as a novelist. The fonds contains: manuscript material with attached correspondence from Gail Anderson-Dargatz' short-stories; manuscripts for her book of short-stories The Miss Hereford Stories and her novel The Cure for Death by Lightning; also included are clippings and other publicity materials indicating the Canadian and international attention given to Anderson-Dargatz' works. The fonds contain the following series: I. Short Fiction, II. Novels, and III. Publicity.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received directly from Gail Anderson-Dargatz in 2000 [2000-07].

    Language: the material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: Material is open to on-site consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available; file level control.

  • Anfousse, Ginette

    Ginette Anfousse fonds. - 1976-1993. - 2 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Children's storyteller and artist Ginette Anfousse was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1944. She was educated at the École des beaux-arts (1961-1965). In addition, she studied engraving at the Atelier Graff in Montreal and the Atelier de l'Île in Val David, Quebec. She was a visual designer with Radio-Canada (1968-1970) and Radio-Québec (1970-1975) - now Télé-Québec - before moving into the literary world. Her work now includes leading theme workshops on young people's literature and informal meetings in school settings.

    She published her first children's stories, Mon Ami Pichou and La Cachette, in 1976. A series of ten books followed, notably La Chicane, La Varicelle, Le Savon and L'Hiver ou le Bonhomme Sept-heures (1978-1980). She won the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize twice, for La Chicane and La Varicelle in 1979; and for Un Loup pour Rose and Une Nuit au pays des malices in 1983. She was awarded the Prix Fleury-Mesplet in 1987 for the body of her work, the Prix Québec-Wallonie-Bruxelles for Les Catastrophes de Rosalie in 1987 and the Mr. Christie's Book Award in 1989 for Rosalie s'en va-t-en guerre. Her most recent work is Rosalie à la belle étoile (1998).

    Scope and Content: The Ginette Anfousse fonds contains manuscripts, sketches, scenarios and original illustrations used in 13 books from the design stage to publication.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1993.
    [1993-14]

    Language: textual material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Arc Magazine

    Arc Magazine fonds. - 1969-1994. - 5 m of textual record. - 1979-1989. - 1 m of textual record.

    Administrative History: Arc Magazine was established in the spring of 1978 with a commitment to publish Canada's cutting-edge poetry and criticism. The literary magazine was edited by Chris Levenson, poet and professor of English literature at Carleton University. The Arc Reading Series preceded the founding of the magazine and brought many Canadian, and other, writers to Ottawa. Although the Arc Reading Series ended in 1994, Arc Magazine continues under new editors.

    Scope and Content: The Arc Magazine fonds includes business correspondence covering 1981 to 1987; evaluation sheets for poems submitted to Arc Magazine for the period 1978-1987; business records covering 1981 to 1987; minutes of meetings of editorial board, 1981 to 1987; records of the Arc Reading Series, 1969 to 1985. The second accession of the Arc Reading Series fonds, received in 1994, contains correspondence, financial records and publicity material.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from Chris Levenson and Lorna Knight in 1990 and 1994. [1990-19, 1994-18]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary list available for first accession.

  • Archambault, Gilles

    Gilles Archambault fonds. - 1964-1993. - 1.2 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist, playwright and essayist Gilles Archambault was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1933. He studied at the Université de Montréal in 1957 and then worked at Radio-Canada producing programs on jazz and literature while pursuing a parallel career in journalism. From 1988 to 1997, he broadcast a column on the program CBF Bonjour. He has contributed to numerous newspapers and periodicals, including La Presse, Le Devoir, L'Actualité and Le Livre d'ici, as well as, contributed to television programs and two feature films. One of his novels, La Fleur aux dents (1971), was made into a National Film Board film. In 1978, he founded les Éditions du Sentier with François Ricard and Jacques Brault. His novels and essays include La Fuite immobile (1974) and Le Voyageur (1981). He was awarded the Prix Athanase-David for the body of his work in 1981 and the Governor General's Literary Award in 1987 for his collection of short fiction L'Obsédante obèse et autres aggressions.

    Scope and Content: The Gilles Archambault fonds contains correspondence; business documents; typescripts of novels, notably Un Après-midi de septembre; Les Choses d'un jour texts written for radio and texts of speeches given between 1990 and 1992.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in two accessions, in 1991 and in 1993. [1991-06, 1993-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first accession.

  • Art Global

    Art Global fonds. - 1978-1980. - 1.5 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Administrative History: Ara Alain Kermoyan founded this publishing company specializing in book production in Montreal in 1972. Initially, Art Global published original prints by Canadian artists and distributed them through a print club. Since 1975, Kermoyan has published illustrated books where the graphic and written arts exist in symbiosis. He selects significant texts and illustrates them with prints, silkscreens and, frequently, with plates. Art Global publications include Roch Carrier's La Guerre, yes sir! (1975), Jacques Godbout's Salut Galarneau! (1976), Anne Hébert's Kamouraska (1977), Hubert Aquin's Prochain épisode (1978), Claude Jutras's Mon Oncle Antoine (1979), Réjean Ducharme's Le Nez qui voque, André Langevin's Poussière sur la ville and Claude Le Sauteur (as told to Georges Dor).

    Scope and Content: The collection contains documents, mock-ups and sketches illustrating the book production, accompanied by a 14 page text written by publisher Ara Alain Kermoyan, documenting the background of this edition, J.A. Martin Photographe Collection.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ara Alain Kermoyan in 1981. [1981-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the Art Global fonds at the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec (MSS 284, MSS 344, MSS 369, MSS 394).

Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures

  • Aya Press

    Aya Press fonds. - 1977-1985. - 4.5 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Administrative History: Glynn Davies founded Aya Press in 1978 and launched his publishing program with Itzy Borenstein's Ancient Music. Aya Press was one of Canada's important small literary presses. The press published the works of experimental poets such as bp Nichol and Steve McCaffery and lesser-known Canadian poets, as well as a number of volumes of fiction by such writers as Leon Rooke, Rikki, Susan Kerslake and Sharon Drache. Aya Press published 21 titles from 1977 to 1984 and is known for the outstanding quality and eclectic nature of its publications.

    In 1985, Aya Press began to co-publish with Mercury Press and shortly thereafter, Aya Press disappeared from the imprint. The Mercury Press continues to publish fiction, Canadian murder mysteries, poetry, and trade non-fiction.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes editorial correspondence, financial records, typescripts, proofs, artwork and a sample copy of the 21 published titles and their reviews.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Glynn Davies in 1985. [1985-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Aylen, Elise

 

B

Beck, Lily Adams

  • Beddows, Eric

    Eric Beddows fonds. - 1985-1992. - 3 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Ken Nutt (whose pseudonym is Eric Beddows) is an award-winning illustrator of children's books. He was born in Woodstock, Ontario, in 1951 and studied fine arts at York University (1970-72), then worked at The Gallery in Stratford, in various capacities while continuing to paint and draw. Nutt was invited by friend Tim Wynne-Jones to illustrate Zoom at Sea (1983) which won numerous awards: The Children's Book of the Year Citation, The International Order of the Daughters of the Empire (IODE), The Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Award, The Canadian Association of Children's Librarians Award (CACL), The Ruth Schwartz Children's Book Award, and The Ontario Arts Council Award. Nutt adopted the pseudonym Eric Beddows in 1986 to distinguish his work as an illustrator from his work as an artist.

    Beddows continued to produce equally successful illustrated works. He collaborated with Tim Wynne-Jones on two more "Zoom" titles: Zoom Away and Zoom Upstream (1993, 1994). Other collaborative works include The Emperor's Panda by David Day (1986), the Cave of Snores by Dennis Haseley (1987) and Night Cars by Teddy Jam (1989). In addition, Beddows collaborated with Paul Fleischman on several books of poems for children: I Am Phoenix: Poems for Two Voices, the Newberry-winning Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices and the story, Shadow Play (1985, 1988, 1990). More recently, Beddows received the Notable Books citation from the American Library Association, in 1992, for Who Shrank My Grandmother's House? Poems of Discovery, and the Governor General's Literary Award for best illustration in an English book, in 1996, for The Rooster's Gift by Pam Conrad.

    Scope and Content: The Eric Beddows fonds includes the sketches, studies, research notes and final illustrations for The Cave of Snores, Night Cars and Zoom Upstream.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ken Nutt in 1988, 1991 and 1994. [1988-02, 1991-04, 1994-09]

    Language: research notes are in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Belford, Charles

  • Bersianik, Louky

    Louky Bersianik fonds. - 1964-1995. - 8.5 m of textual record (pseudonym for Lucille Durand).

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, novelist, playwright and children's author Louky Bersianik was born, Lucille Durand, in Montreal, Quebec, in 1930. After completing a classical education at Collège Jésus-Marie (B.A., 1950), she graduated with her master's degree (with a thesis on Bernanos) from the Faculté des lettres and a bachelor's degree in Library Science from the École de bibliothéconomie at the Université de Montréal. She continued her studies at the Sorbonne and the Centre d'études de radio et de télévision in Paris, where she lived for almost five years. Returning to Montreal, she was a librarian at the Bibliothèque municipale de Montréal (1956-1958) and the Cégep du Vieux-Montréal (1968-1970). She was also a writer, scriptwriter and researcher for radio, television and film, and taught creative writing at Concordia University and the Université du Québec à Montréal.

    From 1964 on, she published children's stories, illustrated by her husband, Jean Letarte. Togo, apprenti-remorqueur won the Prix de la province de Québec (1966). In 1976, she adopted the pseudonym Louky Bersianik to distinguish her writing life from her previous life. Her novel, L'Euguélionne : roman triptyque (1976), is considered a major work because of its treatment of male-female relations. The National Film Board film Firewords, produced by Dorothy Todd Hénault (1986), is based on this novel. Her second novel, Le Pique-nique sur l'Acropole (1979), also followed a feminist theme, and is an important example of Quebec feminism. She has given many public lectures and her poetry, dramatic works and essays on feminism have been published in a number of anthologies. Les Agénésies du vieux monde (1982), La Main tranchante du symbole (1990) and 20 other essays on feminist themes were written between 1980 and 1990. L'Euguélionnne was translated into English by Howard Scott. This translation won the Governor General's Literary Award in 1997.

    Scope and Content: The Louky Bersianik fonds contains correspondence related to her professional activities including symposia, talks, lectures, round tables, etc; manuscripts of published works of fiction and poetry; preparatory notebooks; scores of recorded songs in manuscript; manuscripts and preparatory notebooks for novels and collections of poetry in progress; personal papers; personal correspondence; diaries; family archives; etc. The fonds also contains scripts of radio and television series; films and plays; and preparatory notes for writing workshops.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1996. [1996-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: in preparation.

  • Bice, Clare

    Clare Bice fonds. - 1931-1976. - 9 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Artist, illustrator and curator, Clare Bice was born in Durham, Ontario, in 1909 and raised in nearby London. Bice studied at the University of Western Ontario (B.A., 1928) and then at the Art Students' League and Grand Central School of Art in New York (1930-32). His success as a writer and illustrator of children's books began with the publication of Jory's Cove in 1941 and followed with four more children's books. He worked as curator of the Williams Memorial Art Gallery and Museum from 1940 to 1972 (now the London Regional Art and Historical Museums) and was a member of the Ontario Society of Artists. Bice became well known as a landscape painter and as a portrait and figure artist. He exhibited his work widely, wrote articles on art, and taught at the Doan School of Art and at various Canadian universities during summer sessions.

    Scope and Content: The Clare Bice fonds contains the manuscripts, research notes, sketches, drawings and watercolours for Jory's Cove, Across Canada, The Great Island, A Dog for Davie's Hill and Hurricane Treasure. The fonds also includes business correspondence and clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Mrs. Clare Bice in 1981. [1981-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Bird, Will R.

  • Birdsell, Sandra

    Sandra Birdsell fonds. - 1959-2000. - 4.5 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Sandra Birdsell (née Sandra Louise Bartlette) was born in Hamiota, Manitoba in 1942: the fifth of ten children. She began writing stories in the mid-1970s and published her first collection of stories Night Travellers in 1982. Birdsell studied writing with Jack Hodgins at the Saskatchewan Summer School for the Arts (1982) and took a writing workshop with Rudy Wiebe at the University of Winnipeg (ca. 1978-1979) and a creative writing course with Robert Kroetch at the University of Manitoba. Birdsell became known first as a short story writer: producing two collections of short stories Night Travellers (1982) and Ladies of the House (1984): these linked works (since published in a collected edition) take place in the fictional prairie town Agassiz. Birdsell went on to produce three novels, The Missing Child, The Chrome Suite and The Russländer, and another collection of short stories, The Two-Headed Calf. Birdsell has also written a book for children The Town that Floated Away and written dramatizations for radio, stage plays, film scripts, and television.

    Birdsell is known for writing about the lives and problems of rural women: she brings a dark sense of realism to her writing and confronts the problems of women's lives unflinchingly. The fact that Birdsell was born and raised in Manitoba informs her work. Sandra Birdsell draws on her Russian Mennonite and French Canadian heritage and prairie history (with such events at the Morris flood, for example).

    Sandra Birdsell's awards include the Gerald Lampert Award (1984), the National Magazine Award for Short Fiction (1984), W.H. Smith/Books in Canada First Novel Award (1990), the Joseph B. Staufer Award from the Canada Council for Meritorious Achievement in the Arts (1992), the Marian Engel Award, the Writers' Development Trust Award (1993), and the McNally Robinson Best Book of the Year Award (1993), Saskatchewan Book of the Year Award (1997), Saskatchewan Children's Literature Award (1997), she has also been short-listed for numerous other awards including the Governor General's Award for Literature. Birdsell's work has appeared in The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories, Stories By Canadian Women, and From Ink Lake, among other anthologies. Sandra Birdsell has been invited to teach writing and to be writer-in-residence at a number of institutions (including the Regina Public Library, McMaster University, the University of Waterloo and the University of Alberta). Sandra Birdsell lives in Regina.

    Scope and Content: Dealing with the period of 1959 to 2001, the fonds contains the manuscripts, notebooks, correspondence and related material of novelist and short-story writer Sandra Birdsell. This comprehensive fonds contains manuscript, draft and final versions of Birdsell's novels (The Missing Child, Chrome Suite, The Russländer) and books of short stories (Night Travellers, Ladies of the House, The Two-Headed Calf), and includes numerous drafts of an early, unpublished novel (Bobbie/A Mouse in a Glass Jar). Also included are poems, speeches, essays, scripts for radio, television and film and other miscellaneous writings, photographs, audio recordings, correspondence and printed ephemera relating to her career and teaching. The fonds also contains a large amount of correspondence with other writers: among them Eric McCormack, Alistair MacLeod, Andreas Schroeder, Glen Sorestad, Jane Urquhart and Alice Munro. The fonds contains the following series: Series 1. Working notebooks; Series 2. Manuscripts of early work; Series 3. Short fiction manuscripts; Series 4. Novel manuscripts; Series 5. Scripts; Series 6. Manuscripts of poetry, lyrics and non-fiction prose writing, Series 7. Manuscripts of children's books, Series 8. Correspondence; Series 9. Teaching, touring and professional activities documents and ephemera; Series 10. Education as a writer; Series 11. Research trip ephemera; and Series 12. Personal memorabilia and daybooks.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Sandra Birdsell in January 2002.

    Language: Material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: Some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Blackfish Press

    Blackfish Press fonds. - 1970-1985. - 4 m of textual record and other material.

    Administrative History: The literary magazine Blackfish was founded in 197l by Allan Safarik and Brian Brett, then both students at Simon Fraser University. Although initially formed as an outlet for new, unpublished writers, Blackfish turned to publishing established poets such as Patrick Lane, Dorothy Livesay, Milton Acorn, Earle Birney and John Newlove alongside completely unknown writers. Blackfish produced five issues from 1971 to 1973. By 1972, the press began producing limited edition broadside folios in runs of 150 to 200, each one signed and numbered. Four of the ten planned works were actually produced: For the West Coast by Brian Brett, Face by Seymour Mayne, Disasters of the Sun by Dorothy Livesay and The Age of the Bird by Pat Lowther. In 1973, Blackfish Press began to publish books in a variety of formats and editions in runs of 1 500 to 2 000, notably: North Book (1975) by Jim Green, winner of the Canadian Author's Association gold medal for poetry, Poems of French Canada (1977) translated from French by F.R. Scott, and Venus in Furs (1977) translated from the German by John Glasso. Blackfish Press has not published since 1982.

    Scope and Content: The Blackfish Press fonds contains the administrative records of the Press (1970-1980), including correspondence, financial records and production documents.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Allan Safarik in 1985. [1985-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Blades, Ann

    Ann Blades fonds. - 1973-1987. - 3 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Children's writer and illustrator, Ann Sager Blades was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1947. She received her teaching certificate from the University of British Columbia (1970) and graduated as a nurse from the British Columbia Institute of Technology (1974). Her experience as a teacher in isolated communities in British Columbia inspired her first two books, Mary of Mile 18 (1971) and A Boy of Taché (1973). She has illustrated numerous books by other writers: Jacques the Woodcutter by Michael Macklem (1977), A Salmon for Simon by Betty Waterton (1978), Six Darn Cows by Margaret Laurence (1980), Pettranella by Betty Waterton (1980), Anna's Pet by Margaret Atwood and Joyce Barkhouse (1980), A Candle for Christmas by Jean E. Speare (1986), Ida and the Wool Smugglers by Sue Ann Alderson (1987), The Singing Basket retold by Kit Pearson (1990), A Dog Came Too by Ainslie Manson (1992) and A Ride for Martha by Sue Ann Alderson (1993). Blades's works have been published throughout the world. Mary of Mile 18 won the 1972 Book of the Year Award from the Canadian Association of Children's Librarians and was made into a film distributed by the National Film Board of Canada in 1981. She was awarded the Canadian Children's Literature Award for Illustration (1979) for A Salmon for Simon, and the first Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award (1986) for By the Sea: An Alphabet Book. Ann Blade's work was chosen for an exhibition of Canadian children's book illustrations, Canada at Bologna, held in April 1990 at the Bologna Children's Book Fair in Italy.

    Scope and Content: The Ann Blades fonds contains the correspondence, research notes, manuscripts, sketches, illustrations and paintings for Mary of Mile 18, Boy of Taché and By the Sea: An Alphabet Book, with annotations by the author. The fonds also includes the reviews, publicity and examples of other formats in which the books appeared, such as Braille and tape versions, a film and a multi-media kit.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The majority of the fonds was acquired from Ann Blades in 1987. The illustrations and manuscripts for Mary of Mile 18 were acquired in 1989. [1987-08, 1989-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Blais, Marie-Claire

    Marie-Claire Blais fonds. - 1962-1982. - 5 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Marie-Claire Blais was born in Quebec City, Quebec in 1939. At 20, she published her first novel, La Belle Bête (1959), which earned her the Prix de la langue française. A two-time recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, she moved to Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1963, and wrote Une Saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel (1965), which won the Prix France-Québec and the Prix Médicis, and which was made into a film in 1982. She has written more than 20 novels, five plays and collections of poetry, published in France and Quebec, most of which have been translated into English and other languages. These include Tête blanche (1960), L'Insoumise (1966), David Sterne (1967), Les Manuscrits de Pauline Archange (1968), Vivre! Vivre! (1969), Le Sourd dans la ville (1979), Visions d'Anna (1982), Pierre (1986), L'Ange de la solitude (1989) and Un Jardin dans la tempête (1990). Parcours d'un écrivain, a collection of articles she wrote for Le Devoir during the year she spent in the U.S. (1963-1964), was published by VLB Éditeur in 1993. Marie-Claire Blais also wrote the script for Le Journal en images froides for Radio-Canada in 1977 and contributed to the script for the documentary Tu as crié Let Me Go for the National Film Board in 1997.

    Marie-Claire Blais has won a number of significant major awards including the Governor General's Literary Award which she has won three times, for Les Manuscrits de Pauline Archange in 1969, Le Sourd dans la ville in 1979 and Soifs in 1996. She received the Prix de l'Académie française for Visions d'Anna in 1983, the Prix Athanase-David in 1982 for the body of her work. In 1992 she was named to the Académie royale de langue et de littérature française de Belgique.

    Scope and Content: The Marie-Claire Blais fonds contains notebooks for Une Saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel (1965), David Sterne (1967), Le Loup (1972), Un Joualonais, sa joualonie (1973), and Le Sourd dans la ville (1979), as well as the typed manuscript and research notes for Visions d'Anna (1982). The fonds contains 15 diaries illustrated with approximately 200 watercolours, gouaches and coloured pencil drawings. The Michèle Mailhot accession contains notebooks and notepads which she received from Marie-Claire Blais. The Louise Myette accession contains correspondence (approximately 170 records) exchanged between Myette and Blais, a few letters from Mary Meigs to Louise Myette and a drawing by Mary Meigs. These letters have literary and personal content and several letters are illustrated with drawings, gouaches and collages.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Most of the fonds was acquired from the author. One accession was received in 1992 from Michèle Mailhot (1933- ). Another accession also received in 1992 was from Louise Myette (1930-1996), Marie-Claire Blais' literary agent until 1985. [1985-06, 1986-08, 1988-03, 1989-04, 1989-17, 1992-10, 1992-12, 1993-02, 1997-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: the Myette-Blais correspondence will not be made public for 50 years, except with the permission of the two parties concerned. There are other restrictions governing access to certain records.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first five accessions. A summary list of the other accessions is available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: The Mary Meigs fonds LMS-0161 [1989-15] and the Jeanne Lapointe fonds LMS-0172 [1990-16].

Blissett, William Frank

Bolt, Carol

Borson, Roo and Kim Maltman

Bouchard, Michel-Marc (French only)

  • Bourinot, Arthur S.

    Arthur S. Bourinot fonds. - 1915-1969. - 9 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Arthur Stanley Bourinot, son of Sir John George and Lady Isabelle Bourinot, was born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1893. He served in the Canadian army and Royal Air Force during the First World War (from 1915 to 1919), the last two years as a prisoner of war. He completed his legal training at Osgoode Hall, Toronto and was called to the bar in 1920. He practised law in Ottawa until he retired in 1959. Bourinot began publishing his poems while still an undergraduate and continued to write and publish poetry throughout his life. He received the Governor General's Literary award in 1939 for Under the Sun (1939), poems about the Depression and the coming of the Second World War. He edited the Canadian Poetry Magazine from 1948 to 1954 and from 1966 to 1968; also he was associate editor of Canadian Author and Bookman (1953-60). His carefully researched historical and biographical books and articles on Canadian poets, such as Duncan Campbell Scott, Archibald Lampman, George Frederick Cameron, William E. Marshall and Charles Sangster, have made a valuable contribution to the field of literary criticism in Canada.

    Scope and Content: The Arthur S. Bourinot fonds includes manuscripts, typescripts and galley proofs; correspondence (including some correspondence between his parents, Sir John George and Lady Isabelle Bourinot) as well as notebooks, scrapbooks, and photographs. The fonds also includes some documentation concerning Duncan Campbell Scott, the Canadian Poetry Magazine, the Canadian Writers' Foundation, and the Canadian Authors' Association.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the estate of Arthur S. Bourinot in 1971. [1971-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Bourinot, Arthur Stanley

  • Bowering, George

    George Bowering fonds. - 1961-1999. - 22.7 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, novelist, editor, professor and radio personality, George Bowering was born in Penticton, British Columbia (B.C.) in 1935. He worked as a Royal Canadian Air Force (R.C.A.F.) aerial photographer, then studied at the University of British Columbia (UBC) where he earned a B.A. in History (1960) and an M.A. in English (1963). His masters thesis advisor, American poet Robert Creeley, and other Black Mountain College poets, such as Robert Duncan and Charles Olson, influenced Bowering and his UBC colleagues. He co-founded and edited tish (1961) with Frank Davey establishing a post-modernist, avant-garde movement in British Columbia. He also edited Imago (1964-74), The Beaver Kosmos Folios and four anthologies. Bowering received the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry in 1969 for Rocky Mountain Foot (1968) and Gangs of Kosmos (1969) and the Governor General's Literary Award for fiction in 1980 for his novel Burning Water. He held teaching positions at universities in Calgary, London (Ontario) and Montreal before returning to Vancouver in 1972 where he now resides and teaches at Simon Fraser University. He has adopted the pseudonyms Ed Prato and E.E. Greengrass for some of his reviews and letters to the editor and has used the pseudonym Ellen Field for poetry.

    George Bowering's more recent works include The Rain Barrel (1994), a collection of short stories, the historical works Bowering's B.C.: A Swashbuckling History (1996) and Egoists and Autocrats: The Prime Ministers of Canada (1999); the volumes of poetry, Urban Snow (1992) and Blondes on Bikes (1997); the memoir The Moustache: Memoirs of Greg Curnoe (1993); the novel Shoot! (1994) and the collaborative novel Piccolo Mondo written with Angela Bowering, David Bromige and Mike Matthews. He also co-edited Likely Stories: A Post-modern Sampler (1992) a collection of 23 post-modern Canadian stories. Bowering is known for flaunting the conventions of language and literature in his work by parodying or blending styles and genres.

    Scope and Content: The George Bowering fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts of many of his works, including: Geneve, Autobiology, Ear Reach, Kerrisdale Elegies, A Short Sad Book, Burning Water, Shoot!, Harry's Fragments, as well as unpublished stories, plays and novels. Approximately half of the fonds consists of correspondence with the community of West Coast writers and with other Canadian writers, scholars and artists; among them: Milton Acorn, Margaret Atwood, Margaret Avison, Bill Bissett, Victor Coleman, Greg Curnoe, Frank Davey, Hugh Hood, Joy Kogawa, Robert Kroetsch, Red Lane, Margaret Laurence, Irving Layton, Dorothy Livesay, Gwendolyn MacEwen, David McFadden, Barry McKinnon, John Newlove, bp Nichol, Al Purdy, Fred Wah and Phyllis Webb. The fonds includes notebooks, contracts, clippings, memorabilia and cassette tapes, as well as Information on Bowering's teaching and radio careers and his reading tours.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from George Bowering in 1985 [1985-04] and 1999 [1999-03].

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available for both accessions.

    Associated Material: The George Bowering fonds at Queen's University archives includes early correspondence and manuscripts (1958-69). The University of British Columbia library has a small collection of drafts of poems and correspondence between Bowering and Earle Birney. In addition, the David Bromige fonds and the tish fonds are held at the University of Calgary.

  • Boylesve, René

    René-Boylesve fonds. - 1896-1925. - 22 items of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist, René Boylesve (born René Marie Auguste Tardiveau) was born at La Haye-Descartes, France, in 1867. He studied at the Jesuit College of Poitiers, in Tours, France; at the Faculté des Lettres et de Droit and the École Libre des Sciences Politiques in Paris. He contributed to the Revue bleue and other periodicals. His first novel, Le Médecin des dames de néans (1896), depict provincial life including: Mademoiselle Cloque (1899), La Becquée (1901), L'Enfant à la Balustrade (1903) and La Jeune Fille bien élevée (1909). He was nominated a member of the French Academy in 1919.

    Scope and Content: The René-Boylesve fonds includes 21 letters to Karl Boès, Eugène Montfort and Léon Deschamps dating from 1896 to 1925; and manuscript of three texts: La Niaiserie (ex libris Jacques Boulenger), Une Femme, and Les Idoles maléfiques.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Davaiult collection in 1976. [1976-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: no restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: none.

  • Brand, Dionne

    Dionne Brand fonds. - [1973]-2002. - 3.75 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Through her writing, poet, fiction writer and essayist Dionne Brand explores themes of exile; lesbian erotics; black identity and cultural constructions; racism; revolution; socialism and black women's history.

    Dionne Brand's published writing includes eight books of poetry 'Fore Day Morning: Poems (1978), Primitive Offensive (1982), Winter Epigrams and Epigrams to Ernesto Cardenal in Defense of Claudia (1983), Chronicles of the Hostile Sun (1984), No Language is Neutral (1990, nominated for the Governor General's Literary Award), Earth Magic (1993), A Land to Light On (1997, winner of the Trillium Award and the Governor General's Literary Award) and Thirsty (nominated for the Griffin Prize 2002). Her writing also includes a collection of short stories Sans Souci and Other Stories (1988); two novels At the Full and Change of the Moon (1999) and In Another Place, Not Here (short-listed for the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award and the Trillium Award, 1996); as well as prose works including essays Bread Out of Stone and Map to the Door of No Return (2002) a work of creative prose reflecting on the black diaspora. Her work is widely taught and frequently anthologized.

    Brand has been instrumental in oral history projects concerning black women's history including "The Lives of Black Working Women in Ontario" written with Lois de Shield. Later she developed this oral history work into No Burden to Carry and the film Older Stronger Wiser. Brand also worked on a history of the Canadian Negro Women's Association (CANEWA); a project later completed and published by Laurence Hill. Brand has directed a number of documentary films for the National Film Board of Canada, including Older Stronger Wiser (1989), Sisters in the Struggle (1991), Long Time Comin' (1993), and Listening for Something: Adrienne Rich and Dionne Brand in Conversation (1996), which portrays Brand's dialogue with American poet Adrienne Rich.

    Born in Guayguayare, Trinidad, in 1953 and raised there by her grandmother, Brand immigrated to Canada in 1970, settling in Toronto. She was active in the Black Power Movement in the 1970s: an experience, as she later notes, that helped her counter racial oppression but not sexual repression. Brand received a BA in English and Philosophy from the University of Toronto (1975) and an MA in History and Philosophy of Education from the University of Toronto, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) (1989). In 1983, during the revolution in Grenada, Brand worked for 10 months in the Agency for Rural Transformation and was airlifted out of Grenada during the American invasion. This experience altered her profoundly and surfaces particularly in her writing of In Another Place, Not Here, Chronicles of the Hostile Sun and in her essay "Nothing of Egypt" published in Bread Out of Stone.

    Brand has worked extensively within the black and feminist communities. She was a counsellor at the Immigrant Women's Centre, a founder and editor of Our Lives (Canada's first black women's newspaper), she chaired the Women's Issue Committee of the Ontario Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, was a facilitator for the Ontario Federation of Labour's (OFL) Women's Committee, she was on the organizing committees of the OFL Workers of Colour Conference and the Metro Labour Council Anti-Racism Conference, she worked on the Black Education Project in Toronto, she was Information Officer for the Caribbean Peoples' Development Agencies and served on the board of a shelter for abused immigrant women.

    In 1988, Brand submitted her masters thesis, A Conceptual Analysis of How Gender Roles Are Racially Constructed: Black Women, to OISE at the University of Toronto. She began working toward a PhD in women's history focusing on the work of Mary Ann Shadd (-Cary) editor of the Provincial Freeman and Weekly Advertiser, but quit the PhD program and left an assistant professorship in the English department at the University of Guelph in order to write full-time. In the 1990s, Brand lived for a brief period at Burnt River, Ontario, later returning to live in downtown Toronto.

    Brand has taught courses in black literature, literature by women and creative writing as an assistant professor of English at the University of Guelph and at York University. Brand was writer-in-residence at the Halifax City Regional Library and the University of Toronto (1990-1991) and she held the Ruth Wynn Woodward chair in Women's Studies at Simon Fraser University (2000-2002). She also taught poetry at the West Coast Women and Words and through the Humber School for Writers. Brand took part in the New Nation Writers Conference in South Africa (1991) and participated in the Writing Thru' Race Conference (1994) and the Transitional Identities Conference in Mainz, Germany (2000). She toured England and Scotland with Canadian writers Barbara Gowdy, Nicole Brossard and Lee Maracle in 1992 and was a juror for the Griffin Poetry Prize in 2002.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains manuscripts, research material, copy-edited typescripts and proofs from Dionne Brand's published works of fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose including Sans Souci and Other Stories; At the Full and Change of the Moon; In Another Place, Not Here; Land to Light On; Thirsty; Map to the Door of No Return and Bread Out of Stone. Also included is material from oral history projects, film projects, interviews and teaching; photographs; notes from travel, appearances and awards; and professional and personal correspondence and memorabilia. The fonds documents Brand's activities, graduate studies and writing career from her arrival in Canada up to 2002.

    The various series in the fonds are interconnected as Brand was working on many of these projects at the same time or in conjunction with others. The themes which enliven Brand's work thread back and forth between her poetry, fiction, film, research work and non-fiction prose. Brand's work with oral histories of black Canadian women informs her poetry, novels, prose and film work; as does her past, her experiences coming to Canada, her experiences in the Black Power Movement in Toronto and her work in Grenada. The fonds demonstrates Brands movement from a poet on the scene in the 1970s much involved with grass roots community work to her increasing recognition and critical attention. The fonds also elaborates Brand's connections to other writers, in particular Adrienne Rich with whom she corresponded and from whom she received feedback concerning her writing. Brand has corresponded with George Elliot Clarke, Austin Clarke, Marlene NourbeSe Phillip, Claire Harris, Michael Ondaatje, Michelle Cliff and numerous other writers.

    Most of the material derives from periods when Brand lived in Toronto, although material from the 1990s also includes work composed in Burnt River, Ontario. Certain of the photographs and other material document the period when Brand was in Grenada, or working with Adrienne Rich in California, return trips to Trinidad and Tobago, and conferences or tours in South Africa and Europe. The fonds is divided into the following series: 1. Poetry stories and novel manuscripts; 2. Oral history, black history: manuscripts and research material; 3. Non-fiction Prose: manuscripts of writings on feminism, race, racism and literature; 4. Correspondence and memorabilia; 5. Teaching; 6. Interviews; 7. Conferences, professional appearances and awards; 8. Filmmaking: transcripts, visuals, planning and correspondence; 9. Social action work; 10. Notebooks.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Dionne Brand in September 2002.

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Brault, Jacques

    Jacques Brault fonds. - 1950-1993. - 6.5 m of textual record and sound recordings.

    Biographical Sketch: Critic, poet, short-fiction writer, playwright, novelist and philosopher Jacques Brault was born in Montreal, Quebec, in 1933. After classical studies at Collège Sainte-Marie, he studied philosophy at the Université de Montréal, and in Paris, where he completed his Ph.D. He then taught at the Institut des sciences médiévales and in the Faculté des lettres of the Université de Montréal.

    Brault published texts and creative literary prose which rapidly gained him a reputation as a leading writer among critics in Quebec and France. His collection of poetry Mémoire, earned him the Prix France-Canada in 1969. He won the Governor General's Literary Award twice: in 1970 for his play, Quand nous serons heureux and in 1985 for his novel, Agonie. He also won the Prix Duvernay (1979), the Prix Alain-Grandbois (1991), the Prix David (1986) and the Prix Gilles-Corbeil (1996), the last for the body of his work.

    His recent significant works include La Poussière du chemin (1989), Ô saison, Ô châteaux (1991) and Au Fond du jardin (1996), three collections of essays, articles and poetry. Brault has published articles in a number of literary reviews and contributed to radio programs devoted to writers and artists from Canada and elsewhere, notably Alain Grandbois, Gaston Miron and Hector de Saint-Denys-Garneau. He is considered one of Quebec's most well-rounded writers.

    Scope and Content: The Jacques Brault fonds contains personal and professional correspondence, original manuscripts, research notes, translated works, scripts written for radio programs to which Jacques Brault contributed, audio recordings of interviews and the radio play La Morte Saison.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1991 and 1994. [1991-05, 1994-12]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: available.

  • Brender à Brandis, G.

    Gerard Brender à Brandis fonds. - 1969-1993. - 3 m of graphic material, textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Gerard Brender à Brandis was born in the Netherlands in 1942 and immigrated to Canada in 1947. He received a B.F.A. degree from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, then taught himself the art of bookmaking. Brender à Brandis now works as a wood engraver, book-wright and papermaker. In 1969, he established the Brandstead Press to produce limited editions of wood engravings and lino-cuts.

    Scope and Content: The Gerard Brender à Brandis fonds includes sketches, tracings, proofs and the manuscripts of texts published by the Brandstead Press. In the fonds there are examples of keepsakes, broadsides, posters and other ephemeral publications, as well as, materials documenting the creation of limited-edition books and portfolios. The fonds contains a collection of exhibition catalogues, clippings (including book and exhibition reviews), as well as, a collection of books and periodicals in which his work has appeared.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Brender à Brandis in 1993. [1993-12]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Brewster, Elizabeth

  • Bringhurst, Robert

    Robert Bringhurst fonds. - 1966-1989. - 8 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Robert Bringhurst was born in Los Angeles, California in 1946. He studied physics and linguistics at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, philosophy and oriental languages at the University of Utah, comparative literature at Indiana University (B.A., 1973), and fine arts at the University of British Columbia (M.F.A., 1975). Bringhurst is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose, including Deuteronomy (1974), Bergschrund (1975), Jacob Singing (1977), Tzuhalem's Mountain (1982), The Beauty of the Weapons: Selected Poems 1972-1982 (1982), Pieces of Map, Pieces of Music (1986) and The Calling: Selected Poems 1970-95 (1995). He has also created polyphonic works of poetry set to music, such as, The Blue Roofs of Japan (1986). He received the CBC Poetry Prize in 1985 and the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1987-88. He collaborated with Haida artist Bill Reid on The Raven Steals the Light (1984) and with photographer Ulli Steltzer on The Black Canoe: Bill Reid and the Spirit of Haida Gwaii (1991), which received the Bill Duthie Bookseller's Choice Award in 1992. Bringhurst's published works on art, book design and literary criticism include: Visions: Contemporary Art in Canada (1983); Ocean Paper Stone (1984), a history of fine art publishing in B.C.; and The Elements of Typographic Style (1992), a guide to typographic etiquette, grammar and style. Following his interests in typography and book design, he was contributing editor to Fine Print: A Review for the Arts of the Book (1985-90). Robert Bringhurst has taught creative writing as visiting lecturer at UBC (1975-77), he taught typography at Simon Fraser University, and was poet-in-residence The Banff Centre School of Fine Arts (1983). Bringhurst has been writer-in-residence at four Canadian universities, as well as, universities in Europe and the United States; he has also lectured internationally on Haida literature, poetry, typography and book design. Robert Bringhurst now works as a free-lance editor and book designer in Vancouver. Other recent publications by Robert Bringhurst include Boats Is Saintlier than Captains: Thirteen Ways of Looking at Morality and Design (1997) and Story as Sharp as a Knife: An Introduction to Classical Haida Literature (1998).

    Scope and Content: The Robert Bringhurst fonds includes correspondence, research notes, manuscripts and typescripts of published and unpublished works; business records relating to his work as a professional typographer and designer; copies of books and broadsides designed by Bringhurst and an audio cassette of his readings. The second accession [1990-15] includes correspondence with publishers; manuscripts for Raven Steals the Light and its Japanese translation; and papers relating to Bringhurst's collaboration in the publication.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1988 and 1990. [1988-01, 1990-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is predominately in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Brody, Selma

  • Brossard, Nicole

    Nicole Brossard Fonds. - 1965-2002. - 9.26 m of textual record and other material

    Biographical Sketch: Nicole Brossard, an internationally-known poet, novelist and essayist, was born in Montréal on 27 November 1943. In 1971, she obtained a BA in Literature from the Université de Montréal and in 1972, an honours BA in Education from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Since Aube à la saison, which was published in 1965, Nicole Brossard has published more than 30 collections of poetry, including Mordre en sa chair (1966), L'Écho bouge beau (1968), Suite logique (1970), Le Centre blanc (1970 and 1978), Mécanique jongleuse (1973 and 1974), La Partie pour le tout (1975), Amantes (1980 and 1998), Double impression (1984), L'Aviva (1985), Installations (1989), À tout regard (1989), Langues obscures (1992), Musée de l'os et de l'eau (1999) and Au présent des veines (1999). She has also published prose works, plays, essays and novels, including Un Livre (1970), Picture Theory (1990), Le Désert mauve (1987), Baroque d'aube (1995) and Hier (2001).

    Her writing has influenced many writers in Quebec, Canada and abroad. In 1965, she was a member of the team that founded La Barre du Jour and in 1977, La Nouvelle Barre du jour, both of which are literary journals that she co-edits. In 1976, she was a member of the collective that founded the feminist journal Les Têtes de pioches and, with Luce Guilbeault, made the film Some American Feminists. From 1977 to 1979, she was a member of the first board of directions of the Union des écrivains québécois. In 1991, she published the Anthologie de la poésie des femmes au Québec, with Lisette Girouard. Her writings have appeared in almost 100 anthologies and more than 100 literary journals in Quebec, Canada, the United States, Latin America and Europe.

    As a leading figure in Quebec postmodern feminist writing, Nicole Brossard regularly attends international symposia and literary and feminist events in many countries. She has twice been awarded the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry (in 1974 and 1984). In 1991, she received the Athanas David Award and the Harbourfront Festival Prize. In 1993, she was appointed to the Académie des lettres du Québec and in 2001, became a member of the World Poetry Academy.

    Scope and Content: This archival fonds consists of materials that are indicative of Nicole Brossard's thinking and writing, and of her important contribution to literature and feminism in the second half of the 20th century. It includes various drafts of a dozen collections of poems published since the 1970s, along with some unpublished poems and diaries that provide information about the genesis of Brossard's works and her approach to writing. The fonds also includes preparatory notes and various drafts of her novels, prose works and essays, including the celebrated Le Désert mauve, She Would Be the First Sentence of My Novel and La Lettre aérienne. It also includes files of her work as an editor, translator, filmmaker, speaker and radio host. Lastly, the fonds follows Nicole Brossard's involvement in numerous literary and feminist events, and at gay and lesbian events.

    The materials in this fonds have been arranged into 16 series: 1. Poetry; 2. Novels; 3. Essays and prose; 4. Radio; 5. Diaries; 6. Works published in journals and anthologies; 7. Texts of lectures and symposia; 8. Literary and feminist events; 9. Gay and lesbian events; 10. Translations; 11. Travel; 12. Correspondence; 13. Appointment books and calendars; 14. Various professional activities; 15. Writings and information about the work of Nicole Brossard; 16. Awards and distinctions.

    The fonds consists primarily of manuscripts, typescripts and computer printouts from originals produced on a computer, photographs, posters and audio tapes. There are also press clippings and reviews.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Nicole Brossard on 5 February 2002.

    Language: most of the materials are in French, but all the series also include some records in English, particularly correspondence.

    Restrictions: there are some restrictions on consultation, reproduction and use.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Brown, Edward Killoran

 

C

Callaghan, Morley

Campbell, Wilfred

  • Canada Book Auctions

    Canada Book Auctions fonds. - 1979-1983. - 4.6 m of textual record.

    Administrative History: Antiquarian bookseller Bernard Amtmann, launched Canada Book Auctions initially as Montreal Book Auctions in 1967, in order to develop the market in Canada for Canadian books. When the business relocated from Montreal to Toronto in 1979 it was renamed Canada Book Auctions. The business declined in 1982 and the Board of Directors voted to close it in 1983.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes correspondence, meeting minutes, financial records, typescripts of catalogues and auctioneer's catalogues.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Canada Book Auctions. [1983-16]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Bernard Amtmann fonds LMS-0036 [1976-01, 1989-01, 1993-03]; John Mappin fonds LMS-0224 [1997-02].

Canadian Artists Network: Black Artists in Action

Canadian Authors Association

Canadian Conference of the Arts

Canadian Writers' Foundation

Caplan, Usher

Caplin, Norman Alfred

Carlofsky, Rose

Carpenter, David

Carman, Bliss

Carr, Emily

  • Chabot, Cécile

    Cécile Chabot fonds. - [ca. 1939-1949]. - 30 illustrations : 29 cm by 27 cm or smaller.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, painter, storyteller and writer Cécile Chabot was born in l'Annonciation (Deux-Montagnes), Quebec, in 1907. She studied at the École des arts et métiers and then at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal, from 1933 to 1938. As an artist, she illustrated her own collections of poetry and stories such as: Légende mystique (1942), Paysannerie: conte des rois (1944), Imagerie: contes de Noël (1944) and Le Cheval vert (1961). While creating and publishing her illustrated books, she lectured, contributed to a range of journals and wrote numerous radio and television scripts for Radio-Canada (1942-1946). She was awarded the Royal Society of Canada bronze medal for Féerie in 1964.

    Scope and Content: The Cécile Chabot fonds contains original illustrations for the following books: Vitrail: Poèmes (1939) and Légende mystique (1942), and a watercolour entitled "Gabrielle Roy dans la forêt St-Germain-en-Laye" (1949).

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Cécile Chabot in 1990. [1990-18]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the Music Division, National Library of Canada, has a portion of the Cécile Chabot fonds (MUS183), as does the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec (MSS 447).

Chamberlain, Thomas B.A.

  • Child, Philip

    Philip Child fonds. - 1929-1964. - 1 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Author and professor of English, Philip Child was born in 1898 in Ontario. His studies at the Trinity College, University of Toronto were interrupted in 1917 by his service as an artillery officer during the First World War. He completed his B.A. at Trinity College, an affiliated B.A. at Christ's College, Cambridge (1921) and obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard. Child worked as a journalist, settlement house worker and taught at the University of British Columbia while producing several novels. He returned to Trinity College as professor in 1942, where he eventually became Chancellor's Professor of English.

    Child's published works include: The Village of Souls (1933), a post-war modernist novel depicting the adaptation of the European newcomer to the Canadian wilderness; God's Sparrows (1937); The Wood of the Nightingale (1965), a narrative poem dealing with the Great War; Day of Wrath (1945) describing a Jew's fate under Hitler; Blow Wind, Come Rack (1954), a spy thriller written under the pseudonym "John Wentworth"; and Mr. Ames against Time (1948), which won both the Ryerson Fiction Award and the Governor General's Literary Award.

    Scope and Content: The Philip Child fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts of Day of Wrath, Mr. Ames against Time, The Village of Souls, God's Sparrows and The Wood of the Nightingale.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Philip Child in 1970. [1970-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: file list available.

Clay, Charles

  • Clay, Charles

    Charles Clay fonds. - 1953-1967. - 12 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Journalist, author and publisher, Charles Clay was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1906. He received his B.A. in 1935 from Wesley College, University of Manitoba. He worked his way through university by reporting for the Winnipeg Tribune, and later by editorial writing for the Winnipeg Free Press where he was literary editor from 1931 to 1941. During these ten years, Clay also wrote adventure and historical novels for boys. His first published volume, Swampy Cree Legends (1938), is a translation of tales in the oral tradition of the Swampy Cree northern Manitoba Native people. Unable to join the Canadian Air Force in 1940, he undertook various publicity assignments for the federal government, free-lanced on war topics for numerous Canadian and American journals and published a weekly syndicated column called the Listening Post which kept readers informed of Canada's war work. Clay was Secretary of the Canadian Authors Association and editor of the periodical the Canadian Author, from 1942 to 1946. From 1952 to 1956, Clay produced Teen-age Book Parade, a weekly radio program intended to stimulate interest in reading among teens.

    Scope and Content: The Charles Clay fonds includes correspondence, clippings, typescripts for the radio broadcasts of Teen-age Book Parade, book lists, biographical and subject files.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Charles Clay in 1967. [1967-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

    Associated Material: Charles Clay fonds (MUS39) in the Music Manuscript Collection (National Library of Canada); Charles Clay fonds (MG30 D30) in the Manuscript Division (National Archives of Canada).

  • Cleaver, Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Cleaver fonds. - 1968-1985. - 20 m of graphic material and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Artist, illustrator, storyteller, Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1939. She studied at Concordia University, the College of Sarospatak, Hungary, and L'École des Beaux-arts, Montreal. Her M.A. thesis, written in 1980 for Concordia University, explores the literary, symbolic and visual content in the illustration of a text. She worked for a Toronto advertising firm before turning to picture-book illustration in 1966-1967 at the suggestion of the renowned graphic artist, Allan Fleming. Shortly after, William Toye invited her to illustrate a book of Canadian poetry for children. The ensuing publication of The Wind Has Wings: Poems from Canada (1968), launched Elizabeth Cleaver into the world of book illustration. Her illustrated tales, retold by William Toye and others, include: How Summer Came to Canada, The Mountain Goats of Temlahem, Canadian Wonder Tales, The Witch of the North, The Loon's Necklace, The Fire Stealer, Petrouchka, The New Wind Has Wings and The Enchanted Cariboo. Cleaver introduced the use of collage technique to create backgrounds and forms using coloured textures, and sometimes included natural materials such as grass, birchbark, evergreen branches and fur.

    Elizabeth Cleaver's many awards include the Canadian Association of Children's Librarians' (CACL) Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Medal for outstanding illustration for The Wind has Wings: Poems from Canada and honour book citations for How Summer Came to Canada and The Mountain Goats of Temlaham, all in 1971; Best Book of the Year for Children Medal from the Canadian Association of Children's Librarians in 1974 for The Miraculous Hind: A Hungarian Legend; and the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Medal for The Loon's Necklace in 1978 and the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize for illustration in English for Petrouchka in 1980. In 1986, the Canadian Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) established the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Picture-Book Award.

    Scope and Content: The Elizabeth Cleaver fonds includes original illustrations for 11 published books, from The Wind Has Wings: Poems from Canada (1968), to her posthumously published, The Enchanted Caribou (1985). The fonds includes the preliminary materials such as scribbles, sketches, drawings, research materials, readings and thoughts. The colour proofs, additional collage materials and lino-cuts are often included.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the estate of Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver in 1985. [1985-12]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Coach House Press

    Coach House Press fonds. - 1965-1991. - 90 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Administrative History: Considered one of the leading small press publishers in Canada for its finely-crafted books, the Coach House Press was founded in 1965 by printer, Stan Bevington, and editor, Wayne Clifford. Clifford was succeeded by Victor Coleman in 1966 who remained editor until 1974. In its formative years (1965 to 1975), Coach House was a cohesive printing and publishing unit, publishing innovative and activist open-form writers from the United States and Canada in a style characterized by hand-set type and multi-coloured offset printing. In 1974, the single literary editor was replaced by an editorial board consisting of Coach House writers and other members of the staff (Stan Bevington; writers bp Nichol, Michael Ondaatje, Frank Davey, David Young; graphic artist Rick/Simon; and writers' agent, Linda McCartney). During the 1974-1988 period, the press expanded its scope to publish established writers, such as D.G. Jones, Louis Dudek, Eli Mandel, Dorothy Livesay, Robert Kroetsch, Phyllis Webb, as well as, emerging writers. Diverse titles produced include textbooks, such as Ondaatje's The Long Poem Anthology (1979) and Bowering's Fiction of Contemporary Canada (1980), various titles on the history of Canadian photography and architecture and a Quebec translation series of works by Ferron, Brossard, and others.

    In 1987, the publishing side of the operation was sold to the editorial board. Eventually, a limited company was formed to acquire the press from Bevington and the publishing house was reorganized to function as a more mainstream and profitable enterprise. Due to generous government subsidies in the early 1990s, the new Coach House prospered. Its titles were commercially designed and printed, with distribution by McClelland & Stewart. But, by the mid-1990s Coach House was affected by changes in the Canadian book industry and by reduced funding. In 1996, the directors of Coach House voted to dissolve the Press's operations and return all copyrights to its authors.

    In January 1997, Stan Bevington launched Coach House Books. The Internet-based Coach House Books publishes Canadian poetry, experimental fiction, artist books and drama in the finely designed and crafted small press tradition. Coach House Books is redefining the concept of publishing by offering texts, in their entirety, online through their Web site (www.chbooks.com), as well as, digital ephemera and other projects which present a digital spin on the Coach House tradition.

    Scope and Content: The Coach House Press fonds is central to the study of the small press in Canada. The fonds includes correspondence, submitted manuscripts, financial records, production dockets, and samples of books, posters, publicity and memorabilia. The fonds also includes material related to Victor Coleman, Island Press, Stan Bevington, Bevington Graphics and Rochdale College. The Nicky Drumbolis collection of Coach House Press imprints supplements the Coach House Press fonds and includes 2 380 items: pamphlets, leaflets, broadsides, private issues, postcards, playing cards, Christmas cards, promotional material, press ephemera, manuscript material, recordings, books distributed by Coach House Press, publications with Coach House contributions, vanity publications and publications by presses associated with Coach House Press.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Coach House Press in four instalments and from Nicky Drumbolis in 1992. [1986-04, 1987-13, 1992-07, 1996-12, 1992-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Victor Coleman fonds LMS-0198 [1992-24].

Colbert Agency

  • Coleman, Victor

    Victor Coleman fonds. - 1962-1992. - 7.5 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, editor, audio producer and founding member of numerous publications and artist-run centres, Victor Coleman was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1944. He is regarded as one of the essential "architects" of the new wave modernist literary scene. Self-educated, he entered the book trade as a production assistant for Oxford University Press in Toronto. In 1965, he founded Island magazine and Island Press. He joined the Coach House Press in 1965 as a linotype operator and delivery boy and succeeded Wayne Clifford as editor in 1966, where he remained until 1974. He was instrumental in initiating numerous periodicals such as Is, Image Nation, the Goose & Duck, Open Letter and the Coach House Newsletter. He introduced educational activities such as the Rochdale Poetry workshops, Coach House writing workshops and The Dream Class.

    As director of "A Space" (1975-1978), Coleman ventured beyond literature into performance art, new music, choreography, design and arts criticism. The artist-run centre "31 Mercer" (1979-80) succeeded "A Space" and produced several publications while sponsoring readings, exhibitions, dance, text-related performance and high-profile social events. The journal Eternal Network resulted in 12 publications between 1975 and 1979 and six new titles since 1991.

    Coleman was involved in founding ANNPAC (Association of National Non-Profit Artist-run Centres) and, as of 1991, was involved in organizing a new Canadian small press association. He directed and programmed the National Film Theatre at Queen's University where he taught creative writing, set up exhibitions, organized a Poetry Front reading series and produced a bi-annual student publication. He has published several volumes of poetry and has been included in anthologies of Canadian poetry. Coleman has contributed to the development of avant-garde or post-modernist writing and to the development of a literary community in Canada.

    Scope and Content: The Victor Coleman fonds is a comprehensive archive of his prolific involvement in many activities and institutions, and thus provides an invaluable record of a dynamic period in Canadian culture. The fonds is central to the study of the small press in Canada, as well as, the development of performance art, community interactive artist-run centres, and the poetry reading series in Toronto. It includes correspondence; manuscripts and typescripts of films, radio, video and performance pieces; also included are archives of various publications owned or edited by Coleman and notebooks.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Victor Coleman in 1992. [1992-24]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary listing available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Coach House Press fonds LMS-0129 [1986-04, 1987-13, 1992-07, 1996-12].

 

D

Daigle, France (French only)

  • Daveluy, Marie-Claire

    Marie-Claire Daveluy fonds. - 1890-1967. - 7 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Librarian, historian and writer of young people's literature, Marie-Claire Daveluy was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1880. She received a diploma in Library Science from McGill University in 1920 and subsequently worked as assistant librarian (1920-1943) and head of cataloguing (1930-1941) at the Bibliothèque municipale de Montréal. She was co-founder, with Aegidius Fauteux, of the École de bibliothécaires at the Université de Montréal, which she chaired for a number of years. From 1943 to 1948, she hosted weekly historical sketches on Radio-Canada. Her literary and historical studies were published in a number of periodicals such as La Bonne Parole, L'Action française, L'Oiseau bleu and La Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française. She was awarded the Prix David in 1924 for Aventures de Perrine et Charlot, a historical novel subsequently published in six volumes, and the Prix de l'Académie française in 1934 for Jeanne-Mance, 1606-1673. Her novels for young people combine romantic fiction with Canadian history. Her fairy tales include Le Filleul du roi Grolo, Sur les ailes de l'oiseau bleu and Une Révolte au pays des fées.

    Scope and Content: The Marie-Claire Daveluy fonds contains correspondence, research notes, story treatments, plays and historical texts. It also includes library science course material, proofs and records from historical, literary and religious associations.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Régina Daveluy, sister of Marie-Claire Daveluy and from Hélène Ryan, niece of Marie-Claire Daveluy. [1967-09, 1999-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

Davies, Robertson

  • Davison, Frank C.

    Frank Cyril Shaw Davison fonds. - 1921-1940. - 20 cm of textual record.
    Pierre Coalfleet (Pseudonym used in some literary works)

    Biographical Sketch: Frank Cyril Shaw Davison was born in Hantsport, Nova Scotia in 1893. After his studies at McGill University (B.A., 1913) and Harvard University (M.A., 1914), he worked at a variety of jobs in New York City and then for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C. He moved to Europe in 1919 and worked as a newspaper correspondent in London, Berlin and Paris. He was a member of the Secretariat of the League of Nations in Geneva (1920-1921), and spent time in Berlin (1922) where he met the American artist, Marsden Hartley. He later went to New York and worked as editor and book review editor at the Forum (1923-1924). He returned to Europe in 1924 to pursue his writing career and published Sidonie (1920), Solo (1924), The Hare and the Tortoise (1926) and Meanwhile (1927) under the pseudonym, Pierre Coalfleet. He wrote and adapted several plays with John Hanlon Mitchell, Family Hold Back, was produced in London in 1936. Davison joined the staff of the BBC in London in 1941 and retired from the position of Director of Broadcasting to Western Europe in March 1954. He died in Ibiza, Balearic Islands (Spain) in 1960.

    Scope and Content: The Frank Cyril Shaw Davison fonds includes typescripts of unpublished works: Some Fly East: A Comedy in Four Acts, I Took Myself Seriously, A Faraway Look and The Man in the Moon. The fonds also includes letters from publishers and newspaper clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: first accession acquired from William Hoffer; and the second accession from MacLeod's Books, Vancouver B.C. [1983-01, 1994-11]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Dawson, Aeneas McDonell

Deahl, James

Décarie, Claude, Collection of Saint-Denys Garneau letters (French only)

Dewart, Edward Hartley

Dickson, Lovat

  • Donlan, John

    John Donlan fonds. -- [1966?]-2000. -- 31 cm of textual record. -- 15 photographs: col. ; 11 x 16 cm or smaller.

    Biographical Sketch: John Donlan is a poet and an editor for Brick Books. Donlan was born in Baysville Ontario in 1944. He received a B.A. from Laurentian University and an M.L.S. at the University of Western Ontario. His published works include Domestic Economy (Brick, 1990), Baysville (House of Anansi, 1993) and Green Man (Ronsdale Press, 1999) and his work has been part of a number of anthologies. Donlan works as a reference librarian at Vancouver Public Library.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains material from Donlan's work as a poet and editor including manuscripts, correspondence and professional material. This accession of the fonds contains the following subseries: 1. Correspondence, including professional and personal correspondence; 2. Works, including drafts, notes and related material from publishers; and 3. Professional, including material from his professional activities and professional development.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from John Donlan in 2000 and transferred from McGill University in 2001.

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first accession.

Dorion, Hélène (French only)

Dougall family

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan

Drache, Sharon

  • Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught fonds. - 1972-1987. - 9 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Administrative History: Incorporated as a non-profit co-operative in 1970, Dreadnaught is a graphic design and typographic studio, printing press, and publisher of hand-printed books and ephemera. Dreadnaught continues to carry out the full spectrum of publishing activities from copywriting and editing, through design and production of eloquent logotypes. Special attention is paid to design and craftsmanship that suits the text of each publication. Most recently, Dreadnaught has added multi-media design and production to its services.

    Scope and Content: The Dreadnaught fonds includes artwork and samples of works completed from the period 1972 to 1979. In addition to Dreadnaught imprints in the fields of contemporary literature, philosophy, religion, the arts and hand-produced limited editions, the fonds includes work done for Oberon Press, Harvest House Publishers, Press Porcépic, the National Book Festival and other clients. The fonds also includes financial and production files, proposals, and correspondence with clients and suppliers.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Elizabeth Abraham, Dreadnaught in 1988. [1988-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary list available.

Drummond, William Henry

  • Ducharme, Réjean

    Réjean Ducharme fonds. - 1965-1994. - 85 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist and playwright Réjean Ducharme was born in Saint-Félix-de-Valois, in the region of Joliette, Quebec in 1941. He spent seven months in the Canadian Air Force in 1962, then worked as a salesman, office clerk and cab driver before travelling across Canada, the United States and Mexico for three years.

    Ten of his works have been published by Gallimard which is an accomplishment, given the prestige of this French publishing company. His first novel, L'Avalée des avalées (1966), won the Governor General's Literary Award in 1967. His second novel, Le Nez qui voque (1967), was awarded the Prix littéraire de la province de Québec. These two, plus a third novel, L'Océantume (1968), were published during the years of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec and made a significant impact. Ducharme wrote the plays, Le Cid maghané and Ines Pérée et Inat Tendu in 1968, and Ha ha! which won the Governor General's Literary Award in 1982. He received the Prix Belgique-Canada in 1973 for L'Hiver de force and the Prix France-Canada in 1976 for Les Enfantômes. In addition, he wrote the lyrics of several songs for Robert Charlebois (1976). Ducharme also wrote the screenplay for two very successful films: Les Bons Débarras (1979) and Les Beaux Souvenirs (1981) produced by Francis Mankiewicz. After a 14-year silence, Ducharme surprised the world with two novels, Dévadé (1990) and Va savoir (1994). Réjean Ducharme is considered one of the most significant and original voices in Quebec literary history. He has also exhibited his sculptures and paintings created with found objects, under the pseudonym Roch Plante.

    Scope and Content: The first accession of the Réjean Ducharme fonds contains pre-1994 manuscripts of published or unpublished works, including novels, plays and screenplays. This fonds is based entirely on writings and contains no revealing biographical content. It focuses on his work and its genesis. Les Enfantômes (1976) and Ines Pérée et Inat Tendu (1976), with their multiple re-writes, clearly illustrate the stages in creation of a work, and the challenging journey from draft to final text. A second accession, acquired in 1995, consists of two galleys of a text submitted by Ducharme for an unpublished collection, Morceaux du grand Montréal.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1986. [1986-05] The galleys were acquired from Gilles Lamontagne in 1995. [1995-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: Réjean Ducharme's permission is required for the consultation of unpublished writings.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Dudek, Louis

    Louis Dudek fonds. - 1940-1990. - 15 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, editor, literary critic, publisher and teacher, Louis Dudek was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1918. Following his undergraduate studies at McGill University, Dudek worked as an advertising copywriter and freelance journalist. In 1943, he began graduate studies in journalism and history at Columbia University, but soon changed his major to literature. Following completion of his Ph.D., he began teaching at City College in New York. In 1951, he returned to Montreal and began lecturing in modern poetry at McGill University where he remained until his retirement in 1982. Dudek produced numerous books of poetry and essays, most notably Atlantis (1967), and became a major influence in the development of the long poem with his book-length prose-like meditations. He is considered a major force in Canadian small press publishing. Dudek founded and provided editorial direction to numerous poet-operated and self-financed small presses including First Statement (1942-45) with John Sutherland and Irving Layton, Northern Review (1945-56), Contact Press (1952-54) with Raymond Souster and Irving Layton, The McGill Poetry Series, and Delta Canada (1957-66), known later as D.C. Books. Dudek's Literature and the Press (1960), a revision of his Ph.D. thesis, is a history of printing, printed media, and their relation to literature. He has compiled notable anthologies including The Making of Modern Poetry in Canada (1967) in collaboration with Michael Gnarowski, and Poetry of Our Time (1965), an introduction to 20th century poetry. His most recent publications are Reality Games (1998), a collection of his essays, and The Surface of Time (2000), a collection of poetry.

    Scope and Content: The Louis Dudek fonds documents all aspects of Dudek's literary life. The fonds includes correspondence, student work, manuscripts and typescripts of published works, poetry worksheets, radio and television scripts, articles, lectures; teaching and other professional activities; promotional material and critical reception; clippings and memorabilia. In addition, the fonds contains valuable documentation on the development of the small press or little magazine movement in the 1940s and 1950s.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Louis Dudek in 1990. [1990-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Duncan, Douglas

    Douglas Duncan fonds. - 1926-1977. - 10 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Bookbinder, book collector and art collector, Douglas Moerdyke Duncan was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1902. He studied at the University of Toronto and inspired by the work of Agnes St. John, a Canadian bookbinder, he moved to Paris and pursued bookbinding with Noulhac and Domont. In 1936, he founded the Picture Loan Society, which was established to exhibit, sell and lend out the works of contemporary Canadian artists. His work with the Society eventually became his main occupation. He accumulated a large personal collection of original works of Canadian artists and became a leading participant in the Canadian art world.

    Scope and Content: The Douglas Duncan fonds includes notes about and photographs of his bindings; correspondence, photographs and clippings related to his studies in Paris during the 1920s and 1930s; photos and correspondence related to exhibitions of his bindings held at the National Gallery of Canada in 1971 and the National Library of Canada in 1977.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Douglas Duncan's sister, Frances Duncan Barwick. [1992-14]

    Language: the material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available

 

E

  • Eadie, Tom
  • Eaton, John

    Tom Eadie fonds. - 1962-1967. - 50 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, editor and librarian, Tom Eadie was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1941. He studied at Queen's University (B.A., 1968; M.A., 1971) and received his Master of Library Science from the University of Western Ontario in 1972. He has worked as a librarian at various university libraries. Eadie was editor of Quarry magazine, the student literary magazine of Queen's University, from 1962 to 1967. He was instrumental in transforming it, in 1965, from the annual student literary magazine, to a quarterly literary magazine open to writers from across Canada. In the same year, The Beast with Three Backs, a collection of poems by Tom Eadie, Tom Marshall and Colin Norman, was launched with the Quarry Press imprint. Eadie won an Ontario Arts Council Award for poetry in 1977, and published Dead Letters: Poems in 1996. Quarry has remained an important literary magazine in Canada.

    Scope and Content: The Tom Eadie fonds includes correspondence, financial records, and manuscripts relating to Quarry magazine and the Quarry Press.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Tom Eadie in 1987. [1987-13]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Tom Marshall fonds LMS-0125 [1985-14, 1993-09].

Echlin, Kimberly, Collection of Elizabeth Smart documents

  • Éditions du Sentier

    Éditions du Sentier fonds. - 1978-1986. - 6 cm of textual record.

    Administrative History: The mandate of Éditions du Sentier, founded by Gilles Archambault, Jacques Brault and François Ricard in 1978, was to publish and distribute works in French. As a small, not-for-profit cottage-type publishing firm, with sales by subscription, it could be termed a private press. Between 1979 and 1984, Éditions du Sentier published short runs of five standard-format, illustrated books. Éditions du Sentier ceased to exist on July 26, 1986.

    Scope and Content: The Éditions du Sentier fonds includes administrative records, publishing files (particularly contracts), correspondence and manuscripts.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Éditions du Sentier in 1990. [1990-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Eggleston, Wilfrid

Engel, Howard

 

F

  • Ferguson, Trevor

    Trevor Ferguson fonds. - 197[7]-1997. - 9 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Trevor Ferguson was born in Seaforth, Ontario in 1947 and raised in Huron County, Ontario and Montreal. He travelled and worked throughout Europe and the United States before he returned to Montreal to pursue a career in writing. He is the author of six novels: High Water Chants (1977), Onyx John (1985), The Kinkajou (1989), The True Life Adventures of Sparrow Drinkwater (1993), The Fire Line (1995) and The Timekeeper (1996). The latter won the Hugh Maclennan Prize for fiction and has been published in French. Ferguson is past-Chair of the Writers' Union of Canada and has been writer-in-residence at the University of Alberta (1992-1993) and at Red River Community College.

    Scope and Content: The Trevor Ferguson fonds includes the manuscripts and typescripts of published and unpublished works; documents relating to his professional activities, including the Writers' Union of Canada.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Trevor Ferguson in 1994 and 1998. [1994-03, 1998-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Findley, Timothy and William Whitehead

  • Fischman, Sheila

    Sheila Fischman fonds. - 1968-1998. - 4.25 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Translator, editor and journalist, Sheila Fischman, was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan in 1937. She earned a B.A. in chemistry and a M.A. in anthropology from the University of Toronto. Fischman began her career as a literary translator, almost by accident, when she moved to Montreal and decided to improve her French by translating Roch Carrier's La Guerre, Yes Sir! Pleased with the result, she decided to try to have the book published. It was accepted for publication by the House of Anansi, a small Toronto publisher, and became a bestseller in English Canada. During the 1970s, the Canada Council Translation Grants program was established to encourage the translation of Canadian literature into both English and French. This program contributed to Fischman's prolific translation of over 40 literary works. She is instrumental in bringing the works of Québecois writers - Hubert Aquin, Marie-Claire Blais, Roch Carrier, Georges Dor, Michel Tremblay, Anne Hébert, Jacques Poulin, Yves Beauchemin and others - to English Canada. She received a Canada Council Translation Prize in 1975 for her translation of The Wolf by Marie-Claire Blais and They Won't Demolish Me by Roch Carrier; she became the first winner of the Félix Antoine Savard Prize from Columbia University in 1989; and she received the 1998 Governor General's Literary Award for her translation of Michel Tremblay's Les Vues animées (Bambi and Me). During the 1980s and early 1990s, Sheila Fischman also worked as editor of the Éditions du Roseau's Calliope collection which presented works of English Canadian authors in French.

    Scope and Content: The Sheila Fischman fonds documents Fischman's career as a translator of fiction and non-fiction works from 1968 to 1998. The fonds includes material relating to most of the authors she has translated, including: Max Gros-Louis, Jacques Hébert, Marie-Claire Blais, Jules-Paul Tardivel, Georges Sioui, Pierre Fournier, Lise Bissonnette, François Gravel, André Major, Michel Tremblay, Roch Carrier, Yves Beauchemin and Élise Turcotte. The fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts of translations, correspondence with publishers and authors, photographs, reviews and critical reception. The second accession also documents Fischman's work as editor of the Calliope collection for Éditions du Roseau.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Sheila Fischman in 1992 and 1999. [1992-02, 1999-01]

    Language: the majority of materials in the fonds are in English, though correspondence with authors and Éditions du Roseau and publicity material are in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for both accessions.

Ford, Robert Arthur Douglass

  • Ford, Robert A.D.

    Robert A.D. Ford fonds. - 1933-1995 - 2 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, translator and diplomat Robert Arthur Douglas Ford was born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1915. He graduated from the University of Western Ontario with honours in history and English (1937) and received his M.A. in history (1940) from Cornell University, where he studied Russian and French-Russian relations. Ford joined the Department of External Affairs in 1940 and served, throughout his distinguished career, in appointments as Ambassador to Colombia (1957-1959), Ambassador to Yugoslavia (1959-1961), Ambassador to the United Arab Republic (1961-1963), and Ambassador to the USSR, where he served for 16 consecutive years (1964-1980). Following his retirement, he acted as Special Advisor to Canada on East-West Relations (1980-1984) and was a member of the Independent Commission on Disarmament and Security Issues. In 1971, Ford was awarded the Gold Medal of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada and admitted as Companion of the Order of Canada.

    Throughout his career as a diplomat, Robert Ford was also a poet of distinction. His first book of poetry, Window on the North (1956), won the Governor General's Literary Award. He translated and edited a book of Russian poetry, as well as, works in French, Spanish and Portuguese. Ford's finely-crafted works include The Solitary City (1969), Needle in the Eye (1983), Doors, Words, and Silence (1985), Russian Poetry: A Personal Anthology (1984) and Dostoevsky and Other Poems (1988). His memoirs, Our Man in Moscow, were published in 1989.

    Scope and Content: The Robert Arthur Douglas Ford fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts of published and unpublished works, including Doors, Words and Silence (1985), Dostoevsky and Other Poems (1988), Coming from Afar: Selected Poems, 1940-1989 (1990) and A Moscow Literary Notebook (unpublished); correspondence with publishers and Canadian writers, such as Ralph Gustafson, Seymour Mayne, and Kenneth Millar (Ross McDonald); manuscripts of speeches, articles, and book reviews; cassette tapes of Ford reading; clippings and memorabilia documenting his career. The second accession contains earlier material concerning Russian writers and manuscripts, notes and correspondence about later published works by Ford. The third accession documents the rewriting and publication by the University of Toronto Press of A Moscow Literary Memoir (formerly titled A Moscow Literary Notebook) published in 1995. The fonds also includes correspondence covering the same period [ca. 1991-1995].

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Robert Ford in 1988, 1992, and 1995. [1988-07, 1992-05, 1995-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is mainly in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: Correspondence with William Heine is deposited at the Weldon Library, University of Western Ontario. Material related to Ford's diplomatic career is held at Library and Archives Canada.

  • Fournier, Roger

    Roger Fournier fonds. - 1954-1989. - 3 m of textual record. - 22 drawings.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist Roger Fournier was born in Saint-Anaclet, near Rimouski, Quebec in 1929. He studied at the Séminaire de Rimouski and the Université Laval (B.A., 1954). He began his career as a producer and writer with Radio-Canada. He also studied directing in Europe in 1957. Fournier has contributed to numerous newspapers and magazines, produced feature films, and published short fiction, essays and novels, including Les Cornes sacrées, for which the Académie française awarded him its Prix Louis-Barthou. He also received the Prix France-Canada and the Governor General's Literary Award in 1982 for Le Cercle des arènes, as well as, the Prix Arthur-Buies for the body of his work.

    Scope and Content: The first accession, created between 1964 and 1984, contains the majority of the author's written work from his first novel, La Destruction des sentiments, to Pour l'amour de Sawinne, published in 1984. The fonds also contains published and unpublished short fiction; plays; texts for the press and radio; television and film scripts; correspondence; newspaper articles; and a series of records pertaining to Gilles Vigneault, however, there are a few gaps: manuscripts of the novels, À nous deux! and L'Amour humain, and an essay, Gilles Vigneault, mon ami, may no longer exist. The second accession [1990-13], in which the records date from 1954 to 1989, contains synopses, television scripts, typescripts, a journal dated from 1954 to 1955, educational records, notes and correspondence.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1986 and 1990. [1986-06, 1990-13]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Fraser, William Alexander

  • Friesen, Patrick

    Patrick Friesen fonds. - [1976]-1998. - 5 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, playwright, filmmaker and producer, Patrick Friesen was born in Steinbach, Manitoba in 1946. He began writing stories at an early age and studied English literature at the University of Manitoba (B.A., Honours) where he was inspired by Professor Victor Cowie. His first book of poetry, The Lands I Am (1976) was followed by nine more books: Bluebottle (1978), The Shunning (1980), Unearthly Horses (1984), Flicker and Hawk (1987), You Don't Get to be a Saint (1992), Blasphemer's Wheel: Selected and New Poems (1994), A Broken Bowl (1997), St. Mary at Main (1998) and Carrying the Shadow (1999). Friesen collaborated with Per Brask in several translations from the Danish, God's Blue Morris: A Selection of Poems by Neils Hav (1993), a translation of Klaus Hoeck's The Woods; and an anthology project of Danish poets. While known primarily as a poet, Friesen has demonstrated versatility both in his artistic vision and in his use of diverse media. His play The Shunning was staged by Prairie Theatre Exchange in Winnipeg in 1985, and then adapted for radio in 1990. He has written plays and radio dramas, as well as, written, produced and directed, films and videos. He has collaborated with musicians including songwriter Cate Friesen and jazz pianist Marilyn Lerner. He collaborated on several dance-poetry works, including Anna (1987) with choreographer Stephanie Ballard and dancer Margie Gillis, Handful of Rain (1991) with Ruth Cansfield and Gaile Petursson-Hiley, and Noah (1987) a multi-disciplinary work.

    Friesen has been a major force and presence in the literary world of Winnipeg, Manitoba (where he lived for 30 years) and in the rest of Canada. He was founding President of the Manitoba Writers' Guild (1981) and served on the executive of the League of Canadian Poets. As a poet of Mennonite background, Friesen's explorations and concerns ally him with Di Brandt, Rudy Wiebe and Sandra Birdsell, among others. His collaborative work with dancers, artists and filmmakers has brought Friesen much acclaim. His plays, in particular The Raft, have earned him national recognition as a playwright. Currently, Patrick Friesen resides in Vancouver where he teaches writing at Kwantlen University College.

    Scope and Content: The Patrick Friesen fonds documents his life as a writer, as well as, his professional activities wth CVII and the Manitoba Writers' Guild. It includes correspondence with publishers (such as Turnstone Press) and other writers such as Victor Enns, Gary Geddes and Michael Ondaatje. The material also includes manuscripts, typescripts and drafts of poetry and drama; audio and visual documentation of collaborative work, interviews and productions; and memorabilia. The material demonstrates his multi-faceted career as a poet, playwright, arts organizer, editor and teacher, and his exciting and varied collaborations.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Patrick Friesen in 1992 and 1998. [1992-21, 1998-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available for both accessions.

Fuerstenberg, Adam

 

G

Gaboriau, Linda

  • Gal, Laszlo

    Laszlo Gal fonds. - 1979-1991. - 8 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Graphic designer and illustrator of children's books, Laszlo Gal was born in Hungary in 1933. He graduated with an art education diploma and taught in Budapest for three years, immigrating to Canada during the Hungarian Revolution (1956). Gal lived in Toronto and worked as a dishwasher, waiter, sign painter, artist of political portraits for the editorial page of the Globe and Mail, layout artist, and finally was hired as a graphic designer for the CBC (1958-65). While vacationing in Italy, he presented his illustrations to the famous publishing house, Arnold Mondadori. Working on speculation, he produced 60 illustrations for El Cid and eventually received a contract to work exclusively on Mondadori children's books. He lived in Verona for four years (1965-69), illustrating two full-colour books a year for Mondadori. Returning to Canada in 1970, he began free-lance illustration. In partnership with William Toye, he illustrated Cartier Discovers the St. Lawrence, which launched his career as a Canadian illustrator.

    Gal has illustrated over 40 children's books, published in Spain, France, the United States, as well as, in Italy and Canada. Among his numerous awards are the 1978 IODE Book Award for Why the Man in the Moon Is Not Happy and Other Eskimo Tales of Creation; My Name Is Not Odessa Yarker and The Shirt of the Happy Man. In 1980, he received the Canada Council Award for Children's Literature and the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Award for his work on Janet Lunn's The Twelve Dancing Princesses, which he worked on for two years.

    Gal's intricate drawings and paintings reflect the art of the period in which the story is set, allowing it to influence his choice of medium, composition and technique. Eva Martin's collection Canadian Fairy Tales (1984), reflects the artistic style of Europe adapted to a Canadian setting. The Chinese legend The Enchanted Tapestry (1987), is done in the style of Chinese landscape painting. A Flash of Sea Water (1989) is illustrated in the style of Persian miniatures to complement the text of poet, P.K. Page. Gal has illustrated his own texts of folktales, Prince Ivan and the Firebird (1991) and The Parrot: An Italian Folktale (1997). Laszlo Gal is considered one of Canada's most highly esteemed illustrators.

    Scope and Content: The Laszlo Gal fonds includes illustrations, sketches and tracings for The Twelve Dancing Princesses (1979), Hans Christian Anderson's The Little Mermaid (1983), and Canadian Fairy Tales (1984). Typescripts for The Little Mermaid and Canadian Fairy Tales contain annotations by the artist. A second accession added correspondence and other working documentation and original illustrations for Iduna and the Magic Apples by Marianna Mayer (1988) and Sea Witches by Joanne Robertson (1991).

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Laszlo Gal in 1986 and 1992. [1986-03, 1992-02]

    Language: textual material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Galloway, Priscilla

    Priscilla Galloway fonds. - 1976-1995. - 40 cm of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Teacher and author of childrens' books, Priscilla Galloway was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1930. She studied at Queen's University (B.A., 1950) and at the University of Toronto (M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1977). Although she had dreamed of doing graduate work in journalism, she instead began her 31-year career as an English teacher at secondary public schools in Toronto (1954-56) and in North York (1956-86), while raising three children. She contributed stories, poems and articles to education journals and popular magazines in Canada, sometimes under the pseudonym Anne Peebles. In her mid-40s - finally finding the time, energy, and space for herself - she began writing short stories, published poetry, and studied for a Ph.D. (University of Toronto, 1977). Her first two works were both published in 1980: Good Times, Bad Times, Mummy and Me is a children's picture book; and What's Wrong with High School English?: It's Sexist, unCanadian, Outdated is based on her doctoral research. Galloway has also taught part-time in the graduate faculty of education at the University of Toronto and has been writer-in-residence at three libraries in northern Ontario. Her recent publications have merited numerous awards: Truly Grim Tale; Atalanta, The Fastest Runner in the World; and Aleta and the Queen received the Canadian Children's Book Centre "Our Choice" Award in 1996, The American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults, and a Quick Pick for Young Adults in 1996.

    Scope and Content: The Priscilla Galloway fonds includes correspondence, writing for children, educational writing, women's studies documents and memorabilia.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Priscilla Galloway in 1993 and 1995. [1993-18, 1995-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Garneau, Hector de Saint-Denys

    Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau fonds. - 1928-1939. - 20 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Montreal, Quebec in 1912 to an old Quebec family, Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau completed part of his classical education at Collège Sainte-Marie (1923), continued it at Collège Loyola (1924), and also studied painting at Collège des beaux-arts de Montréal, then Collège Brébeuf. In 1923, he began writing poetry which earned him a number of awards in literary competitions. In 1927, he began publishing articles on art and poetry. He then joined the group at La Relève, a monthly magazine devoted to literature, philosophy and religion which published a number of his articles and poems between 1934 and 1937. His collection Regards et jeux dans l'espace was published in Montreal in 1937. After three weeks in France in 1937, he gradually retreated into solitude and silence. Disappointed and ill, Saint-Denys Garneau withdrew to the family manor where he died in 1943 following a heart attack. His posthumous works, Poésies complètes (1949) and his celebrated Journal (1954) have made him one of Quebec's most important modern poets.

    Scope and Content: The Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau fonds contains diaries, 1935-1939; correspondence; manuscripts of texts including short fiction, essays and poetry; and a scrapbook.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Saint-Denys Garneau's heirs in 1993. [1993-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Other Formats: the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec microfilmed the fonds in 1994.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau fonds at the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec. (MSS-200)

  • Gauntlet Press

    Gauntlet Press fonds. - 1958-1991. - 3 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Administrative History: Founded in 1960, Gauntlet Press is the personal press of poet Richard Outram and his artist/wife Barbara Howard. The Press publishes Outram's poetry, illustrated by Howard's wood engravings. The earliest productions were broadsides and cards, but books of poetry have also been issued, including Thresholds (1973), Locus (1974), Arbor (1976), Around and about the Toronto Islands (1993), Peripatetics: Some Annotations, Glosses and Divers Comments upon Around & about the Toronto Islands (1994) and Tradecraft and Other Uncollected Poems (1994). These carefully crafted editions are printed on handmade paper and bound by the Outrams themselves.

    Biographical Sketch: Richard Outram was born in Oshawa, Ontario in 1930 and studied at Victoria College, University of Toronto. He was an employee of the CBC, and has been writing poetry since the 1950s. Outram has also published collections of poetry with other publishers such as Exsultate, Jubilate (1966), The Promise of Light (1979), Selected Poems (1984) Man in Love (1985), Hiram and Jenny (1988), Mogul Recollected (1993) and Benedict Abroad (1998).

    Barbara Howard was born in Long Branch, Ontario in 1926 and studied at Western Technical School in Toronto, the Ontario College of Art and St. Martin's School in London, England. Howard is a painter and printmaker, and a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts.

    Scope and Content: The Gauntlet Press fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts of Outram's poetry and prose for the period from 1958 to 1991; drawings, proofs and woodblocks by Barbara Howard; and mock-ups of many of the Gauntlet Press publications.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Barbara Howard and Richard Outram in 1978 and 1991. [1987-02, 1991-17]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first accession. Preliminary list prepared by the creators available for the second accession.

  • Gay, Marie-Louise

    Marie-Louise Gay fonds. - 1976-1988. - 4 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Artist Marie-Louise Gay was born in Quebec City, Quebec in 1952 to Franco-Ontarian parents. She spent the first few years of her life in Quebec (Sherbrooke, Montreal), Ontario (Oakville), and British Columbia (Vancouver), returning to Montreal when she was 13 years old. She studied at the Institut des arts graphiques (which became Cégep Ahuntsic) and took a program in animation at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. In 1976, after some years as a freelancer for a range of Canadian periodicals, she accepted a proposal from Bertrand Gauthier to illustrate a children's book, Hou Ilva. Their collaboration continued with Dou Ilvien (1978) and Hébert Luée (1980). In 1978, Marie-Louise Gay polished her technique at the Academy of Art College in San Francisco. On her return to Montreal in 1981, Éditions de la courte échelle hired her as artistic director. From this point on, her career soared, as she was responsible for all aspects of production of her works. She published several books in quick succession in both French and English: De zéro à minuit (1981), La Sœur de Robert (1983), and the Drôle d'école series, and Moonbeam on a Cat's Ear (1986), Rainy Day Magic (1987), Angel and the Polar Bear (1988) and Willy Nilly (1990).

    The many awards she has received include the 1986 Canada Council Children's Literature Prize for illustrations published in a French book for the Drôle d'école series, and the same prize, also in 1986, for illustrations published in an English book, Dennis Lee's Lizzy's Lion. She won the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Award twice, in 1987 for Moonbeam on a Cat's Ear and in 1988 for Rainy Day Magic. The latter work also won the Governor General's Literary Award for illustrations. Gay also teaches illustration and style in the design department at Université du Québec à Montréal.

    Scope and Content: The Marie-Louise Gay fonds covers the production period from 1976 to 1988, from her first illustrated book, Hou Ilva, to her 14th, Angel and the Polar Bear. The fonds contains manuscripts, typescripts, drafts, scenarios, unpublished drawings and original illustrations. The documentation outlines the various stages involved in producing a children's book from writing to illustrations.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1991. [1991-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is mainly in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Geddes, Gary

    Gary Geddes fonds. - 1963-1995. - 20 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1940, Geddes studied at the University of British Columbia (B.A., 1962) and at the University of Toronto (M.A., 1966; Ph.D., 1975). For over 25 years, his has been a multi-faceted literary career. As a poet, his first major success came in 1969 when he was awarded the E.J. Pratt Medal for his book-length poem Letter of the Master of Horse, published in 1973 by Oberon Press. Several important volumes followed, including the acclaimed War and Other Measures (1976) and The Acid Test (1981), which won the Canadian Author's Association National Poetry Prize. He received the Archibald Lampman Poetry Prize in 1990 for No Easy Exit/Salida dificil.

    Geddes began another career as an editor and anthologist of Canadian literature while a student at the University of Toronto. Important texts he edited include 20th-Century Poetry and Poetics (1969) and 15 Canadian Poets (1970). The anthologies Skookum Wawa (1975) and Divided We Stand (1977) are among his accomplishments. Geddes has also been active as a publisher and founder of three literary presses. First with the subscription press, Quadrant Editions (1980-1983) and later with Cormorant Books (1984-1990), Geddes demonstrates his desire to establish contact between writers and readers. Geddes has lectured on English literature and creative writing at universities across Canada and since 1978 at Concordia University in Montreal. He continues to give poetry readings and public lectures worldwide. Geddes was nominated for the prestigious Gabriela Mistral Prize offered by the Organization of American States for service to Latin America; however, he actually received a prize under the same name, in honour of the 50th anniversary of Gabriela Mistral's receipt of the Nobel Prize, from the Chilean government in 1996.

    Scope and Content: The Gary Geddes fonds documents the outstanding literary career of one of Canada's foremost contemporary men of letters. Geddes is a prolific correspondent whose letters with other well-known writers detail his professional involvement and organizational skills, as well as his role as a literary mentor and editor. The fonds includes personal and professional correspondence; notebooks, worksheets, manuscripts and typescripts of poems, essays, anthologies, articles, reviews and short stories. The fonds also includes the Quadrant Editions records (1980-1989) and the Cormorant Books records (1984-1995). The 1997 accession brings additional personal and literary correspondence, worksheets, drafts of manuscripts, related to the following works: Companeros: An Anthology of Writings about Latin America (1989), Letters from Managua: Mediations on Politics and Art (1990); four titles of poetry: Light of Burning Towers: Poems New & Selected (1990), Girl by the Water (1994), The Perfect Cold Warrior (1995), Active Trading: Selected Poems, 1970-1995 (1996); and his expanded and revised 4th edition of an anthology on the development of poetic sensibility in Canada, 20th-Century Poetry & Poetics (1996).

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Gary Geddes in several accessions. [1984-02, 1988-05, 1990-14, 1997-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on correspondence.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession.

  • Gérin-Lajoie family

    Gérin-Lajoie family fonds. - 1874-19l5. - 9 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist, essayist, historian, editor, translator and public servant Antoine Gérin-Lajoie (1824-1882) was born in Yamachiche, Quebec. In 1837, he enrolled at Collège de Nicolet, where he was mentored by Abbé Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Ferland. He was a young college student when he wrote his first poetry, the well-known folk song Un Canadien errant, and his three-act tragedy, Le Jeune Latour, which was published in newspapers beginning in 1844.

    Gérin-Lajoie studied law in Montreal (1844-48) and participated in the foundation of the Institut canadien. By 1848, he was a practising attorney, with interests in both politics and literature. In 1851, he wrote his Catéchisme politique, a practical manual dealing with Canada's political institutions. He interned as a journalist with La Minerve until 1852, when he became a translator in the Legislative Assembly. In 1856, he was appointed Assistant Librarian of Parliament, and became the primary author of the Catalogue de la Bibliothèque du Parlement (1857-1858). Returning to Quebec, he was active in literary life during the 1860s. He was the founder of two literary magazines, Les Soirées canadiennes (1861) and Le Foyer canadien (1863), where the two volumes of his novels, Jean Rivard, le défricheur (1862) and Jean Rivard, économiste (1864), were published. His work, Dix ans au Canada, de 1840 à 1850 (1888), the story of the establishment of responsible government, published posthumously, is considered his best work.

    Scope and Content: The Gérin-Lajoie family fonds consists of handwritten letters between Antoine and Joséphine, in Ottawa, and their son Henri Gérin-Lajoie, a student in Montreal. The fonds also contains correspondence related to the publication of Antoine Gérin-Lajoie's works and documentation about the Sulte, Lajoie and Parent families.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gérin-Lajoie in 1974. [1974-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • German, Tony

    Tony German fonds. - 195[0]-1991. - 4.5 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Historian and writer of books for children, Tony German was born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1924. His historical adventure novels successfully combine an extensive knowledge of history with personal narrative, introducing young people to the richness of Canada's history through interesting reading. The Tom Penny series, in particular, has brought him much praise. His novels have been translated widely and adapted for film. German received The Ottawa Citizen Award for non-fiction in 1991 for his history of the Canadian Navy, The Sea Is at Our Gates. German's active participation in Ottawa's literary scene - in particular, his volunteer work for associations and events such as the Ottawa Valley Book Festival - has earned him a reputation as a key figure in Ottawa's literary community.

    Scope and Content: German's papers include diaries and research materials which he used as a basis for his fiction. The fonds also includes his research and manuscripts for works of non-fiction.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Tony German in 1992. [1992-19]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on correspondence.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Gibson, Shirley

    Shirley Gibson fonds. - 1970-1974. - 5 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet and publisher, Shirley Gibson was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1927. She left school in Grade 10 and worked at a variety of jobs including at the London (Ontario) Art Gallery and Museum. She was married to Graeme Gibson and had two children. She worked for Artscanada magazine in 1967, then joined House of Anansi Press in 1969 (where she became managing editor (1971) and later president (1972).) She continued to be an activist for the arts in her position as executive director of Playwrights Canada president of the Association of Cultural Directives, vice-president of the International Theatre Institure and producer at CJRT radio.

    Scope and Content: The Shirley Gibson fonds consists of documents and correspondence relating to Gibson's career at House of Anansi Press and complements the official fonds acquired from the press.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Shirley Gibson in 1996. [1996-08]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary listing available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: House of Anansi Press0150 [1988-13, 1989-16].

  • Giroux, André

    André Giroux fonds. - 1938-1972. - 2 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: André Giroux, who was born in Quebec City, Quebec in 1916, was passionate about literature from a young age, but the premature death of his parents interrupted his studies and delayed his dream of writing. In 1936, he began work in Quebec's Department of the Provincial Secretary, and pursued a public service career, as well as, his writing career. He published two novels, Au-delà des visages (1948) and Le Gouffre a toujours soif (1953), and a collection of short fiction, Malgré tout, la joie (1959). Giroux was involved in the radio program Trois de Québec (1950-1952) and wrote the weekly television series 14, rue de Galais (1954-57). He was killed in an automobile collision in 1977. The honours and distinctions which he earned in his lifetime included an appointment to the Royal Society of Canada, the Prix Montyon from the Académie française (1949) and the Governor General's Literary Award (1960).

    Scope and Content: The André Giroux fonds contains typescripts of novels and television series, as well as unpublished radio and television scripts, speech texts, newspaper articles and correspondence.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ms. Rachel Giroux in 1983 and François Hébert in 1999. [1983-02, 1999-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: correspondence with his wife is restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the André Giroux fonds in the Archives nationales du Québec (Centre d'archives de Québec et Chaudière-Appalaches) (P499).

Glassco, John

  • Gnarowski, Michael

    Michael Gnarowski fonds. - 1956-1985. - 4 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Professor, poet, editor and critic, Michael Gnarowski was born in Shanghai, China in 1934. He studied at McGill University (B.A., 1956), Indiana University (1959), the Université de Montréal (M.A., 1960), and received his Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Ottawa in 1967. While an undergraduate at McGill, Gnarowski began to publish his poetry in the magazine, Yes (1956-1970) which he co-edited. He continued to reinforce his creative writing with editing and publishing activities. Literary periodicals with which he was involved or edited include Le Chien d'or/The Golden Dog (1970-1972), Delta, Golden Dog Press (1971-1985), and Tecumseh Press. He was also series editor for McGraw-Hill Ryerson's Critical Views on Canadian Writers Series (1969-1977) and co-edited Canadian Poetry (1977- ) with David Bentley.

    Scope and Content: The Michael Gnarowski fonds includes writers' manuscripts and correspondence relating to the publishing houses Golden Dog Press and Delta (Canada) and the little magazines Yes (1956-70) and The Golden Dog (1972-74); writers manuscripts and correspondence relating to the McGraw-Hill Critical Views Series, edited by Gnarowski; and correspondence with writers Earle Birney, Louis Dudek, John Glassco, Carl Klinck, Irving Layton and Al Purdy.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Michael Gnarowski in 1988. [1988-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Godbout, Jacques

    Jacques Godbout fonds. - 1954-1995. - 14 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Jacques Godbout was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1933. He completed a master's degree in the Faculté des lettres at the Université de Montréal in 1954 (with a thesis on Arthur Rimbaud), and was appointed to the faculty of the University College of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, where he taught philosophy and French. He returned to Canada in 1957 to work for the National Film Board as a screenwriter (1958-1960), director of French production (1970), and as a producer and editor. At the same time, he was building a career as a poet, novelist, essayist, playwright and journalist. His work includes three volumes of poetry: Carton-pâte (1956), Les Pavés secs (1958) and C'est la chaude loi des hommes (1960). Godbout received the Prix France-Canada in 1965 for his first novel, L'aquarium (1962), the Governor General's Literary Award in 1973 for Salut Galarneau! (1967), and the Prix Dupau from the Académie française for D'amour P.Q. (1972). He also wrote L'isle au dragon (1976), Les Têtes à Papineau (1981), and Une Histoire américaine (1986) about American culture and the French language in North America after the 1980 referendum. His honours also include the Prix Duvernay from the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste in 1972, for the body of his work, the Prix Belgique-Canada in 1978, and the Prix du Québec (Athanase-David) in 1985. He was director and founder of L'Actualité and founder of the Union des écrivaines et écrivains québécois (1977-1978). He has been the publisher and member of the board of Éditions du Boréal since 1987.

    Scope and Content: The Jacques Godbout fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts of poems, published and unpublished novels, documentation, film projects and scenarios, typescripts of narratives, creative texts and criticisms, and typescripts of texts written for radio and television.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Jacques Godbout in three accessions in 1989, 1994 and 1996. [1989-11, 1994-05, 1996-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: restrictions on certain unpublished records.

    Finding Aid: summary list available.

Gool, Réshard

Gotlieb, Phyllis

Gowdy, Barbara

Gray, John Morgan

Grey Owl

Grignon, Joseph-Jérôme (in French only)

Guèvremont, Germaine (in French only)

 

H

Harewood, John

  • Harlow, Robert

    Robert Harlow fonds. - 1953-1983. - 4.5 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Prince Rupert, British Columbia in 1923, Harlow joined the R.C.A.F. at the age of 19 and served as a Flying Officer until his discharge in 1945. He studied at the University of British Columbia (B.A., 1948) where he participated in Earle Birney's creative-writing workshops, and his M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Iowa (1950) - the first Canadian to attend Paul Engle's writers' workshop. On his return to Canada, Harlow joined the CBC as a public-affairs producer, and with Robert Weaver, was instrumental in launching the popular literary program Anthology (1953). He was appointed CBC's director of radio for the British Columbia (B.C.) region in 1955. Among his contributions to the literary community in B.C., Harlow founded the literary magazine, Prism International (1959), with Birney and others. In 1965, he was appointed founding head of the Department of Creative Writing at UBC, Canada's first department of creative writing with which he was affiliated for 24 years (as head from 1965-77 and as professor from 1977-88) and where he is currently professor emeritus. He has published numerous novels, including Royal Murdoch (1962), Scann, (1972), Making Arrangements, (1978), Paul Nolan (1983), Felice: A Travelogue (1985), and The Saxophone Winter (1988), as well as contributions to anthologies and literary reviews.

    Scope and Content: The Robert Harlow fonds includes correspondence; manuscripts, typescripts; diaries; research notes for poetry, novels, short stories; scripts for radio, television and film; articles and book reviews. The fonds includes materials for Royal Murdoch, A Gift of Echoes, Scann, Making Arrangements, Paul Nolan and Felice: A Travelogue.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Robert Harlow in 1984. [1984-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Harou, Lise

    Lise Harou fonds. - 1967-1990. - 1.8 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Lise Harou was born in Saint-Georges-de-Beauce, Quebec in 1950. Her passionate interest in language led her to linguistics and sociolinguistics. Since 1981, while working in the Office de la langue française for the Quebec provincial government, she has published several works of fiction, including Chroniques souterraines (1981), Devant l'étang (1984), À propos de Maude (1986), Parcours piégés: récits (1990), Exercices au-dessus du vide: récits (1991) and Un Enfer presque familier: roman (1992).

    Scope and Content: The Lise Harou fonds contains drafts and manuscripts and typescripts of all her published works, as well as unpublished texts and manuscripts of articles published in literary journals.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in three accessions. [1987-12, 1988-12, 1991-08]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

  • Harris, David p>David Harris fonds. - 1966- 1994. - 7 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: David W. Harris, better known as David UU (pronounced "double-you") was born in Barrie, Ontario in 1948. He is considered an accomplished concrete and experimental poet and an important small press publisher. Along with bill bissett and bp Nichol, he was a pioneer of the concrete-poetry movement in Canada, and perhaps the first Canadian poet to explore visual collage embodying literary, philosophical and language references. He also wrote and published more conventional poetry, poems and prose for children, two novels, short stories, scripts for theatrical performance and several essays. In addition, Harris founded and operated Fleye Press (1966-67), Derwyddon Press (1972-73), Silver Birch Press (1987-94), and co-founded grOnk in 1967. Harris died in 1994 at a farmhouse near Delhi, Ontario.

    Scope and Content: The David Harris fonds includes manuscripts of his published and unpublished works, as well as handwritten notes in his "Work in Progress" file. Harris encouraged and published a younger generation of experimental writers and the fonds contains extensive correspondence with Canadian writers. Also included are books and periodicals published by Harris or in which his works appeared, as well as, many small press publications.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Received from the Estate of David W. Harris in 1996. [1996-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

  • Haskins, James

    James Haskins fonds. - 1840. - 3 pages (one leaf).

    Biographical Sketch: Doctor and poet, James Haskins was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1805 and studied the arts and medicine at Trinity College, Dublin. He immigrated to Canada with his sister and his aunt in 1834 and settled in Belleville (Upper Canada) where he practised medicine in the surrounding region. Haskins contributed poetry to the Literary Garland (Montreal) between 1843 and 1846. A volume of his poetry was published posthumously by a friend, entitled The Poetical Works of James Haskins (1848) and edited by Henry Baldwin.

    Scope and Content: The James Haskins fonds includes three manuscript poems written by Haskins on a single sheet and mailed to Reverend A.N. Bethune (editor of The Church) in Cobourg in 1840: Rachel, The Contrast, and The British Oak.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from David Ewens Rare Books. [1983-14]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: none.

Hertz, Kenneth

  • Hodgins, Jack

    Jack Hodgins fonds. - 1951-1995 - 15.3 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Hodgins was born in 1938 and raised in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, whose landscape and people form the basis for his fictional settings and characters. He attended Earle Birney's creative-writing workshop while a Bachelor of Education student at the University of British Columbia. He continued to write evenings and weekends while teaching English to secondary-school students in the Nanaimo district between 196l and 1979. A writer and teacher, Hodgins is in demand to edit anthologies and writing texts. These include Voice and Vision (1972), The West Coast Experience (1976), Teaching Short Fiction (1978), and A Passion for Narrative: A Guide for Writing Fiction (1994). He has been a writer-in-residence at Simon Fraser University and the University of Ottawa, and gives fiction workshops in the Department of Writing at the University of Victoria.

    The publication of Spit Delaney's Island (1976), a collection of short stories, was followed by two successful novels: The Invention of the World (1977), and The Resurrection of Joseph Bourne (1979), which won a Governor General's Literary Award for fiction. Other more recent titles include Left behind in Squabble Bay (1988), The Honorary Patron (1990), Innocent Cities (1990), Over Forty in Broken Hill (1992) and The Macken Charm (1995). Hodgins received the Gibson First Novel award, the Eaton's BC Books Award, and the Canada-Australia Award. His works have been translated into Japanese, Norwegian, Dutch, Hungarian, Russian and Italian. His most recent novel, Broken Ground (1998), depicts the struggles of the settlers to break ground on land given to First World War veterans on Vancouver Island.

    Scope and Content: The Jack Hodgins fonds includes correspondence; drafts, revisions, manuscripts and typescripts for published books; manuscripts and typescripts of unpublished and abandoned works; notes, galleys and other documents relating to anthologies he edited. The second accession [1989-05] consists of correspondence with publishers, editors and magazines; notes, drafts, manuscripts for Left behind in Squabble Bay, Innocent Cities, A Passion for Narrative, The Macken Charm, Over Forty in Broken Hill; manuscripts for short stories, radio dramas, reviews and afterwords. The third accession of the fonds complements the earlier accessions and includes correspondence during the years 1990 to 1995.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Jack Hodgins in three accessions. [1984-04, 1989-05, 1996-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession; preliminary listing available for second and third accessions.

  • House of Anansi

    House of Anansi Press fonds. - 1967-1989. - 20 m of textual record.

    Administrative History: House of Anansi Press, named after the African spider-god, creator, trickster and storyteller, was founded in 1967 by Dennis Lee and David Godfrey. Anansi Press is considered one of the most important literary presses to emerge in the 1960s as writer-publishers invented a national literature and pursued a political agenda. Anansi published Canadian fiction, poetry, and criticism, translations of Quebec literature, as well as non-fiction on Canadian issues. Anansi experienced success quickly with the reprint of Margaret Atwood's The Circle Game, which had won the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry in 1967. Anansi has published works by George Bowering, Roch Carrier, Michael Ignatieff, Erin Mouré, and Charles Taylor among others. Located at 671 Spadina Avenue (later at 35 Britain Street) near the Coach House Press, the presses issued a joint catalogue in 1968 and Coach House designed and printed a number of Anansi titles. In 1989, Anansi was acquired by Stoddart publishing.

    Scope and Content: The first accession of the House of Anansi Press fonds includes manuscripts and galleys, authors' correspondence, financial documents, catalogues, promotional material, posters, book jackets, negatives, and unpublished manuscripts for the first 10 years of its operation (1967-1977). The second accession covers the next 10 year period (1977-1987).

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ann Wall, Anansi publisher in 1987 and 1989. [1988-13, 1989-16]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary list available.

  • Houston, James

    James Houston fonds. - 1965-1988. - 20 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Author, illustrator, sculptor and filmmaker, James Houston was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1921. He received his artistic training at the Ontario College of Art (1938-1940), École Grande Chaumière in Paris (1947-1948) and in Japan (1958-1959) where he studied printmaking with Unichi Hiratsuka. He first travelled to Ungava in the Arctic in 1948 and settled on Baffin Island in 1951, where he lived among the Inuit for 12 years. Houston became the region's first civil administrator in 1953, a position he held for nine years. His appreciation of Inuit creativity led him to initiate the idea of marketing their sculpture and he established the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative. He also introduced the Inuit to printmaking, a technique he learned in Japan. As a result, he is considered the prime force in the development of Inuit art and printmaking. In 1962, Houston moved to New York and became Associate Director of Design with Steuben Glass. A chance meeting with Margaret K. McElderry (editor of children's books for Harcourt) led to the writing and illustrating of his first book Tikta'liktak: An Eskimo Legend (1965).

    Best known as a writer of juvenile fiction, he is, more than any other Canadian writer, responsible for bringing the life of Canada's First Peoples to the rest of the country through his fiction. He has won the Book of the Year Award of the Canadian Association of Children's Librarians three times for Tikta'Liktat (1966), The White Archer (1968), and River Runners (1980). His Whiteout received the Max and Greta Ebel Memorial Award for Children's Writing in 1989. Apart from writing and illustrating more than 20 children's books, novels, and other works dealing with the Arctic, Inuit or Native life and/or art, he has created documentaries and screenplays for feature films, resulting in numerous international film awards. Houston was made an officer of the Order of Canada for his work as an administrator, artist and writer.

    Scope and Content: The James Houston fonds is composed of the manuscripts, paintings, and illustrations of Houston's novels: Tikta'liktak, Eagle Mask, The White Archer, Akavak, The White Dawn, Wolf Run, Songs of the Dream People, Ghost Paddle, Kiviok's Magic Journey, Ghost Fox, Frozen Fire, River Runners, Long Claws, Black Diamonds, Eagle Song, Ice Swords, Falcon Bow, and Spirit Wrestler. The fonds also contains correspondence, articles, lectures, book reviews, profiles and manuscript material or illustrations for works by other authors.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from James Houston in 1988. [1988-08]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Hulcoop, John

    John Hulcoop fonds. - 1950-2000. - 70 cm of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Scholar, critic, editor and poet John Hulcoop was born in London, England in 1930, and pursued his education at University College London. Hulcoop immigrated to Canada in the 1950s and began teaching in the English department at the University of British Columbia, where he is now Professor Emeritus. A 19th century scholar by training, Hulcoop has written on both the novel and the long poem, and has published works on Robert Browning, George Eliot, Truman Capote, and Virginia Woolf. As an editor and critic of Phyllis Webb's work, he edited and wrote the introduction to Phyllis Webb's Selected Poems of Phyllis Webb, 1954-65 (Talonbooks, 1971) and published Phyllis Webb and Her Works (ECW Press, 1990). John Hulcoop has also maintained a long friendship with Phyllis Webb. During his college days at University College London, Hulcoop met Jane Rule resulting in another important friendship. As a critic, Hulcoop pursued a critical interest in Timothy Findley and produced the first major critical essay on Findley's work for Canadian Literature (Winter 1981). As an editor and poet he has come into contact with a number of other Canadian writers and has produced two works of poetry, Three Ring Circus Songs (Talonbooks, 1968) and Untuning the Sky (Pamina Publishing, 2000). John Hulcoop lives and works in Vancouver.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains correspondence with writers such as Phyllis Webb, Jane Rule, Timothy Findley and David Watmough; as well as handwritten drafts, typescripts and final typescripts for writing by Jane Rule, Phyllis Webb, David Watmough and for Hulcoop's own poetic works. In many cases, the files include notes to researchers by the fonds creator indicating the relevance of the material. The fonds contains the following series: Series I. Phyllis Webb, Series II. Jane Rule, Series III. Various Correspondence, Series IV. Poetry by John Hulcoop 2001-02.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received directly from John Hulcoop in 2001 [2001-02].

    Restrictions on Access and Use: Correspondence with Jane Rule is RESTRICTED and will remain sealed until her death. Correspondence with Phyllis Webb requires the permission of both Phyllis Webb and John Hulcoop.

    Finding Aid: This finding aid is a combination of the calendar of items submitted by John Hulcoop along with the material and a RAD (Rules for Archival Description) description to the file level by the archivist. The itemized lists by John Hulcoop inserted after the RAD description of each file is noted for their personal detail and assistance to the researcher.

I

  • Itani, Frances

    Frances Itani fonds. - 1942-2000. - 3.9 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Frances Susan Itani (née Hill) is a writer, teacher and editor who works in the genres of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, children's literature, reviews and radio drama. She was born in Belleville, Ontario, in 1942. "Sam or Sammy," as her parents and siblings call her, moved with her family to Quebec in 1947 where she grew up in the village of Deschênes. She became a registered nurse (Montreal General Hospital School of Nursing, 1963), studied for eight months in a post-graduate program at Duke University Hospital in North Carolina and completed a year of graduate study in nursing at McGill University (1966-67). She holds a BA in English and Psychology from the University of Alberta (1974), where she studied with and became a close friend of W.O. Mitchell, her first writing teacher. She also studied with Rudy Wiebe in Alberta. She earned an MA in English Literature at the University of New Brunswick (1980). Her thesis "Ten Short Stories" was supervised by Maritime poet/editor/professor Dr. Fred Cogswell. Ms. Itani practised and taught nursing for a total of eight years during the 1960s and 70s, before she began to write. Because of her background in nursing and psychology, she continues to work, as a volunteer, for various organizations affiliated with medical institutions. She is a member of the Board of Directors for the Ottawa Deaf Centre.

    Frances Itani has written eight books including a novel, Leaning, Leaning Over Water (1998); three collections of short stories, Man Without Face (1994), Pack Ice (1989), and Truth or Lies (1989); a children's book Linger By the Sea (1979) illustrated by Molly Bobak; three books of adult poetry, one of which, A Season of Mourning, was also illustrated by Bobak. Two other books of poetry, No Other Lodgings (1978) and Rentee Bay (1983), were illustrated by Shizuye Takashima. In 1997, Ms. Itani co-edited, with Susan Zettell, the posthumous stories (One of the Chosen), of her former student, Danuta Gleed. She is family advisor to the Danuta Gleed Literary Award, an annual, national award for short fiction administered by The Writers' Union of Canada. Ms. Itani has always been interested in writing for radio. Toronto actor Eve Crawford has done many readings of Itani's CBC stories and has performed in her radio drama.

    Frances Itani has won national awards, including the CBC/Tilden/Saturday Night Literary Awards in both 1995 and 1996 for her short stories. She won third prize in the CBC Literary Competition in 1984, was awarded the Ottawa-Carleton Book Award in 1995 and the Canadian Fiction Magazine award for best short story in 1987. Her work has been published widely across Canada in anthologies, journals and periodicals. Ms. Itani was poetry editor of The Canadian Forum from 1996-1998. She has taught creative writing at many schools, workshops and universities in Canada and Europe, as well as at The Banff Centre School of Fine Arts. She was writer-in-residence at the Nepean Public Library (1989) and teaches every spring at Trent University.

    Frances Itani has always enjoyed learning languages and began to travel at an early age. Her interests include the internment of Japanese-Canadians during the Second World War, about which she has written extensively. She married (1967) Japanese-Canadian, Major (retired) Tetsuo Itani, OMM, CD, who served for 37 years in the Canadian Forces and who now works for international organizations, primarily teaching international humanitarian law and working in the area of human rights and humanitarian relief. This affiliation has much affected Ms. Itani's work as she has moved several times to countries at war, or to other continents, where she has set stories or articles of non-fiction. The Itanis have lived in seven Canadian provinces and have raised two children, Russell (b.1971) and Samantha (b.1973).

    Scope and Content: The fonds consists of manuscripts, correspondence, art work, photographs, mixed media (newspapers, audio and audio visual material), academic information and other material relating to the personal interests and activities of Frances Itani. The fonds is divided into 11 series, with sub-series. The series are: 1. Correspondence; 2. W.O. Mitchell; 3. Danuta Gleed; 4. Rita Donovan; 5. Fred Cogswell; 6. Promotional material; 7. CBC; 8. Fiction and non-fiction, published and unpublished works (three sub-series: first-draft scribblers, manuscripts, and Leaning, Leaning Over Water); 9. Personal material and memorabilia; 10. Personal correspondence between mother and son; and 11. Peacekeeping, war correspondence and war journal.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Frances Itani in March 2001.

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

J

Jacob, Edward Frederick Fulford

  • Jacob, Suzanne

    Suzanne Jacob Fonds. - [c. 1960] - 2002. - 0.96 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Suzanne Jacob, née Barbès, was born in Amos, in Abitibi (Quebec), on 26 February 1943. After attending primary and secondary school at Sainte-Thérèse d'Amos school, she continued her classical education at the Collège Notre-Dame de l'Assomption de Nicolet and also attended the town's theatre workshop and the music school as well. At the same time as she was studying literature and art history at the Université de Montréal, she was involved in two Apprentis-Sorciers creations. In 1968, she made her debut as a writer-composer-performer in Montréal on stage in the boîtes à chanson (coffeehouses) Chez Clairette and the Patriote. From 1969 to 1974, she taught French as a second language, and performed poetry, monologues and songs just about everywhere in Quebec. From 1970, the Patriote awarded her the trophy for writer-composer-performer of the year. It was also in 1970 that she performed at the Spa festival in Belgium. In 1978, with Paul Paré, she founded the publishing house Le Biocreux, and immediately diversified her literary and artistic activities. Records, radio dramas, television theatre, performance tours in Quebec and abroad, articles, film scripts, short stories, poetry collections, novels and essays followed.

    Suzanne Jacob published some major works: Flore Cocon (novel, 1978); La Survie (short stories, 1979); Poèmes I: Gémellaires. Le Chemin de Damas (1980); Laura Laur (novel, 1983, Prix Paris-Québec and Governor General's Literary Award in 1984); La Passion selon Galatée (novel, 1986); Maude (novel, 1988); Les Aventures de Pomme Douly (short stories, 1988); Plages du Maine (travelogue, 1989); Filandere cantabile (poetry with CD, 1990); L'Obéissance (novel, 1991); Les Écrits de l'eau (poetry, 1996); Ah…! (articles, 1996); La Part de feu (poetry, 1997, Governor General's Literary Award and Prix de la Société Radio-Canada in 1998); La Bulle d'encre (essay, 1997, Prix de la revue Études françaises 1997); Parlez-moi d'amour (short story, 1998); Rouge, mère et fils (novel, 2001); Écrire comment pourquoi (essay, 2002). Suzanne Jacob has also published some 50 articles and reviews in journals and magazines. In 1992-1993, she was Writer-in-Residence at the Université de Montréal. She lectures regularly in Quebec, France and the United States.

    Scope and Content: The materials in this fonds relate to Suzanne Jacob's writing, her activities as a writer-composer-performer and, to some extent, her relationships with family members.

    The fonds includes some unpublished works, but mainly consists of her diary, correspondence, and manuscripts for her published works. Included are early versions of La Passion selon Galatée and Plages du Maine; preliminary notes and documentation used for the writing of L'Obéissance; drafts of La Bulle d'encre and Écrire comment pourquoi; also included are excerpts from the novel Laura Laur. The fonds also contains materials relating to the writing of the screenplay La Beauté de Pandore.

    The records in the fonds are arranged into five series: 1. Personal records; 2. Published works; 3. Unpublished materials; 4. Correspondence; 5. Activities as a writer-composer-performer.

    The fonds primarily contains manuscripts: holographic documents, typescripts and printouts from materials originally produced on a computer, photographs and scores. There are also a few audiovisual records and some press clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Suzanne Jacob in September 2002.

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation, reproduction and publication.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Jenkins, Charles Christopher

[Johnson, Pauline] The tossing of a rose

Johnston, George

  • Jones, Daniel

    Daniel Jones fonds. - [1970] -1994. - 4.9 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Daniel Jones was born in 1959 in Hamilton, Ontario. In 1977, at the age of 18, he moved into the city of Toronto and never left. He was never shy to voice his extreme dislike of suburban life.

    It was in high school that Jones first showed promise as a writer. He penned a play titled Tricentennial Jesus, which he starred in and directed. The play was performed at his high school and went on to be performed at the Hamilton District Collegiate Drama Festival (1977) and at the Ontario Collegiate Drama Festival (1977), winning awards at both festivals.

    At the beginning of his writing career, Jones focused on poetry. Known only as "Jones," he became well-known on the Toronto literary scene for his alcohol-fuelled poetry readings. He became quite well-known after one particularly agressive reading of Jack and Jill, which he performed naked from the waist down. Years later, Jones would express some regret over his reputation as an enfant terrible, preferring to be known as Daniel Jones. He did, however, continue to perform his readings in an unusual manner, including the 1992 launch of his book Obsessions, during which he delivered his reading with a whip in hand and literally launched his book into the audience using a sling.

    Not being able to survive solely on a career as a poet, Jones worked in a psychiatric hospital and at various jobs including grill cook, landscaper and administrator for various writers' groups. While these jobs may appear to be of little interest, they are all reflected in Jones' writing in some way.

    It was no secret that Jones struggled with alcoholism. In 1985, he gave up drinking altogether and met and married Robyn Gillam. Shortly after giving up drinking, Jones also gave up writing poetry. He began to focus on several careers - fiction writer, critic, editor, creative writing teacher and publisher. In 1989, he and Gillam founded Streetcar Editions, a small press that published little-known writers and Jones was the publisher. He also became quite active on the Toronto literary scene. He was coordinator of the Toronto Small Press Book Fair, served as editor-in-chief of Paragraph magazine, contributed to What! magazine, and served on the editorial collectives of Piranha and Border/Lines. He also regularly reviewed books for such literary publications as Books in Canada, Quill and Quire, Rubicon and Piranha. With all these projects going on, Jones also found time to write and publish his own autobiographical fiction.

    After battling severe depression for years, Daniel Jones took his own life at the age of 34 on February 14, 1994. The reaction from the Toronto small-press community was that they had lost a friend as well as an activist for the Canadian small press.

    In all Jones published nine works, from chapbooks to full-length works. After his death, it was discovered that he had left behind a completed novel, titled 1978, which Rush Hour Press published in 1999. Another novel, The People One Knows which had been submitted to Mercury Press before his death, was published posthumously.

    Scope and Content: The Daniel Jones fonds touches on every stage of his life, from photographs of his early childhood to final drafts of his unpublished novel, 1978. This fonds shows Jones as writer, critic, editor, publisher and activist.

    This accession contains a substantial amount of correspondence. It was difficult to separate the correspondence into professional and personal categories, as Jones tended to be friends with individuals who had an interest in the literary world. Many of these letters mix personal topics with discussions of writing and publishing. The Correspondence (Series 1) has been divided into two sub-series, Personal and Professional, with the latter sub-series consisting strictly of correspondence of a business nature, mainly submissions to literary publications. As well, a fair amount of professional correspondence is included in Series 3 Editorial and Publishing because of its relevance to the material in that series.

    Series 2 Writings deals with all of Jones' writing, from his high school years until just before his death. This series has been divided into several sub-series, demonstrating the different hats Jones wore as a writer. This series consists of published and unpublished/incomplete works, his work as a critic, and his non-fiction work writing articles for various publications. It also includes his research notes as well as publicity for his published works.

    Jones' editorial career is the focus of Series 3. He worked as an editor for Border/Lines, Paragraph and his own publishing house Streetcar. This series includes submissions and correspondence with other writers, administrative information, manuscripts, drafts and production material.

    Series 4, the final series of the fonds, consists of Jones' personal articles and is divided into three sub-series. The first contains his date books, which span a 13-year period, and his diaries, which were not as consistently maintained. The second sub-series highlights his academic record as well as employment history and a large section is dedicated to grants applied for and received. The third sub-series consists of artwork by Jones in various media and the fourth sub-series consists of a large collection of photographs, which chronicles his early childhood, his teenage and early adult years to the end of his short life.

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

 

K

Kains, Archibald

  • Kearns, Lionel

    Lionel Kearns fonds. - 1955-1990. - 13 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, short-story writer and educator, Lionel Kearns was born in Nelson, British Columbia in 1937. He studied at UBC, where he became involved with the tish group of poets, and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University. Kearns was writer-in-residence at Concordia University (1982-83), first writer-in-electronic-resident on the "Wired Writers" Network (1988), and a teacher of literature at Simon Fraser University since 1966. He continues to write poetry that ranges from a concern with semantics and semiology to a concern with performance and effect. He has also worked in other genres, such as film, and has studied the interconnections between poetry, computers and consciousness.

    Scope and Content: The Lionel Kearns fonds includes correspondence; personal papers; manuscripts and typescripts of published works; research notes; poetry worksheets; teaching notes; material from other literary activities; reviews and promotional material.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Lionel Kearns in 1990. [1990-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Kennedy, Leo

  • Kèro

    Photographs of Quebec writers. - [ca. 1970-1980]. - 35 photographs: b & w ; 25 cm by 20 cm.

    Biographical Sketch: Montréal photographer Kèro Beaudoin is well known for her numerous photographs of Quebec writers taken between 1960 and 1995. Her portraits have been the focus of various exhibitions and books, and have appeared in films and literary dictionaries. In 1981, she published an album of portraits, Au fonds des yeux: 25 Québécoises qui écrivent (Éditions Nouvelle Optique). She has lived in Québec City since 1998.

    Scope and Content: A collection of 35 photographs of Quebec writers : Hubert Aquin, Victor Lévy Beaulieu, Louky Bersianik, Marie-Claire Blais, Nicole Brossard, Françoise Bujold, Roch Carrier, Paul Chamberland, Pierre Dansereau, Marcel Dubé, Raoul Duguay, Jacques Ferron, Michel Garneau, Gratien Gélinas, Eloi de Grandmont, Roland Giguère, Jacques Godbout, Claude Haeffely, Gilles Héneault, Claude Jasmin, Marie Laberge, Michelle Lalonde, Jacques Languirand, Félix Leclerc, André Major, Henriette Major, Gilles Marcotte, Pierre Nepveu, Fernand Ouellette, Madeleine Ouellette Michalska, Hélène Ouvrard, Guy Robert, Marie Savard, Yves Thériault, and Gilles Vigneault.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the photographer in 1984. [1984-01]

    Restrictions: no reproduction of the photographs is permitted.

    Finding Aid: list available of writers photographed.

  • Khalsa, Dayal Kaur

    Dayal Kaur Khalsa fonds. - [1983]-1991. - 3 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Dayal Kaur Khalsa was born in Queens, New York in 1943. She immigrated to Canada in 1979 and lived in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. Khalsa was an enchanting storyteller whose stories skillfully combine text and illustration. She was the author and illustrator of eight books for children. Her strong and vivid gouache illustrations are full of humorous detail. Titles of her works include: Baabee: livres pour bébés=Baabee: Books for Babies (1983); Tales of a Gambling Grandma (1986); I Want a Dog( 1987); Sleepers (1988); My Family Vacation (1988); How Pizza Came to Our Town (1989); Julian (1989); Cowboy Dreams (1990); all published by Tundra Books of Montreal. She received numerous awards for her achievements.

    Scope and Content: The Dayal Kaur Khalsa fonds consists of original illustrations for Khalsa's books along with research, notes, and some material relating to publication. The third accession includes materials for the posthumously published The Snow Cat.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Estate of Dayal Kaur Khalsa. [1989-20, 1991-14, 1992-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Kinsella, W.P.

    W.P. Kinsella fonds. - 1973-1998. - 29 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: W.P. Kinsella was born in 1935, 60 miles west of Edmonton, Alberta. Kinsella worked in the business world for 20 years before earning his B.A. in creative writing from the University of Victoria (1974) and a M.F.A. from the University of Iowa's Writer's Workshop (1978). From 1978 until 1983 when he began to write full-time, Kinsella taught creative writing and modern literature at the University of Calgary. Kinsella's novels occur in two types of settings: stories situated in the world of Native reserves in southern Alberta and baseball-inspired fictions set in the American Midwest. His best-known baseball-inspired novel is Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes to Iowa (1980), which was later adapted as the film Field of Dreams (1989). Stories with Native characters are included in the collections: Dance Me Outside (1977), The Thrill of the Grass (1984), and Brother Frank's Gospel Hour (1994). Among other awards, Kinsella won the prestigious Houghton-Mifflin Award and the Books in Canada first novel award for Shoeless Joe, as well as the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour in 1987 for The Fencepost Chronicles. He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1994.

    Scope and Content: The W.P. Kinsella fonds consists of correspondence; manuscripts and typescripts of both published and unpublished poetry, short stories and novels, including Dance Me Outside, Scars, Born Indian, The Moccasin Telegraph and Other Stories, The Thrill of the Grass, Shoeless Joe, and The Iowa Baseball Confederacy; book reviews and articles; cassette tapes; clippings and memorabilia.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from W.P. Kinsella in four accessions. [1984-08, 1988-11, 1992-09, 1998-08]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for the first and second accessions.

Kirby, William

Klein, Abraham Moses

Klein, A.M.

 

L

  • Lalonde, Robert

    Robert Lalonde fonds. - 1971-1991. - 72 cm of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Actor, playwright and novelist Robert Lalonde was born in Oka (Deux-Montagnes, Quebec) in 1947. He obtained his B.A. from the Séminaire de Sainte-Thérèse, then studied for three years at the Conservatoire national d'art dramatique de Montréal, where he won first prize for performance in 1971. In addition to acting, Robert Lalonde taught performing arts at Saint-Jérôme and Longueil colleges from 1973 to 1975, and wrote scripts for Radio-Canada, songs, plays, including Je t'aime, mais c'est pas grave and an adaptation of Chekhov's Three Sisters, novels and poetry. He was awarded the Prix Robert-Cliche in 1981 for his first novel, La Belle Épouvante. In 1982, he also won the Prix Jean-Macé in France for Le Dernier Été des Indiens, the Prix Paris-Québec in 1985 for his novel Une Belle Journée d'avance and the Grand Prix de la Ville de Montréal, in 1988, for Le Fou du père. More recently, his novel Le Petit Aigle à tête blanche won two awards: the Governor General's Literary Award in 1994, and the Prix Québec-France in 1995. His first collection of short fiction Où vont les sizerins flammés en été? was published in 1996.

    Scope and Content: The fonds demonstrates Robert Lalonde's creativity and versatility in a range of genres: novels, plays and poetry. The fonds includes manuscripts, drafts, notes related to his works, correspondence and a few photographs.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1992. [1992-23]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Lambert, Lucie

    Lucie Lambert fonds. - 1974-1987. - 2 m of graphic material and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Lucie Lambert was born in Shawinigan, Quebec in 1947. After obtaining a B.A. from Université Laval, she studied engraving in Paris. On her return to Canada, she completed a bachelor's degree in the plastic arts (engraving option) at the Université du Québec à Montréal (1975). She has also studied Arabic and Chinese calligraphy. In the mid-1980s, she was introduced to sculpture in Vancouver by Haida artist Bill Reid.

    Scope and Content: The Lucie Lambert fonds contains plates for published works, such as La Mante (1979), Le Prince et la ténèbre (1980), Aléa (1982), La Naissance des nuages (1984) and Conversations with a Toad (1987); as well as unpublished works; sketches and exercises which provide valuable Information about the genesis of her works; photographs, exhibition catalogues and audio recordings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the artist in 1991. [1991-03]

    Language: textual material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Lampman, Archibald

  • Lapointe, Jeanne

    Jeanne Lapointe fonds. - 1946-1990. - 15 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Jeanne Lapointe, a professor at Université Laval, has acted as a literary critic, teacher and mentor for a number of Quebec writers, including Anne Hébert, Marie-Claire Blais and Gabrielle Roy. She played a significant role in the drafting of the Parent Report (Rapport de la Commission royale d'enquête sur l'enseignement dans la province de Québec, 1965-66).

    Scope and Content: The Jeanne Lapointe fonds consists of manuscripts, correspondence and original drawings. The correspondence, covering the period from 1946 to 1984, contains letters exchanged with some Quebec writers, including Marie-Claire Blais and Gabrielle Roy (ten letters) and those close to them (Mary Meigs, Barbara Deming); the fonds also includes correspondence received by Jeanne Lapointe (167 letters and some texts, written between 1946 and 1990) and a typescript of Alexandre Chenevert, caissier by Gabrielle Roy, annotated by Jeanne Lapointe and Gabrielle Roy.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: the records in the Jeanne Lapointe fonds were deeded to the National Library in 1991. [1990-16]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Leacock, Agnes Butler

Leacock, Stephen Butler

League of Canadian Poets

Leblanc, Gérald (in French only)

  • Le Franc, Marie

    Marie Le Franc fonds. - 1922-1963. - 2 m of textual record and photographs.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist and poet Marie Le Franc was born and educated in Sarzeau, France, in 1879 and obtained her teaching diploma from the École normale de Vannes in 1897. After teaching in Brittany for a few years, she immigrated to Canada, planning to marry Arsène Bessette. The marriage did not take place, but Marie Le Franc settled in Quebec and taught in the Montreal region. She wrote two volumes of poetry. Les Voix du cœur et de l'âme was published in 1920, followed in 1923 by Les Voix de misère et d'allégresse. She subsequently published numerous novels and short stories. Her novel, Grand-Louis l'innocent (1925), written during a stay in Brittany, was printed in Canada and won the Prix Fémina de France. Le Franc returned to France in 1929 but visited Canada frequently, finding her inspiration in the Canadian landscape. Her Canadian novels are based on her love of the sea, lakes and forests, and on her admiration for the life of simple people. They include: Hélier: fils des bois (1930), Le Fils de la forêt (1952), and Les Pêcheurs de Gaspésie (1938). She died at the Château du Val in Saint-Germain, France in 1965.

    Scope and Content: The Marie Le Franc fonds contains the manuscript of Grand Louis le revenant and other manuscripts and typescripts of short stories, articles and speeches, press clippings, criticisms, photographs and correspondence with authors such as Jean Bruchési, Claude-Henri Grignon, Louvigny de Montigny, Honoré Mercier, Louis Dantin, Victor Barbeau and Adrien Thério, covering the period from 1950 to 1963. The second accession contains 37 letters from Marie Le Franc to Marie de Varennes-Simard, her friend and correspondent, during the period from 1950 to 1963.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ms. Blain Le Franc in 1982. [1982-04, 1982-03]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

  • Legris, Isabelle

    Isabelle Legris fonds. - 1935-1992. - 6.2 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Isabelle Legris was born in Louiseville (Maskinongé), Quebec in 1928. She was educated at the Soeurs de l'Assomption convent and began writing when she was 15 years old. She moved to Montreal in 1941, and began studying for an arts degree at l'Université de Montréal which she did not complete. She became a free-lance translator in Montreal and wrote stories for Radio-Canada. In 1947, she published her first collection of poetry, Ma Vie tragique: poèmes de la douleur et du sang. An author of books for children and grammar and spelling manuals, she also published further collections of poetry, including Parvis sans entrave (1963) and Le Sceau de l'ellipse (1979).

    Scope and Content: The Isabelle Legris fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts of her works, her correspondence, and press clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in a number of accessions. [1981-06, 1983-20, 1987-18, 1993-16]. In 1983, Isabelle Legris' sister, Hélène Legris-DeLano, donated the letters she had received from her sister between 1978 and 1982. [1983-19]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

  • Lemelin, Roger

    Roger Lemelin fonds. - 1938-1986. - 6.5 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer, journalist and businessman Roger Lemelin was born in Quebec City's Lower Town district. He attended École Saint-Joseph and the Académie commerciale de Québec, but dropped out of school in Grade 8 and went to work. Self-educated, he worked in a factory and as a journalist. In 1944, he published his first novel Au pied de la pente douce which earned him an award from the Académie française and the Prix David, in 1946. His second novel Les Plouffe (1948) was adapted for radio and television, and, made into a successful film by Gilles Carle in 1980. Lemelin also published Fantaisies sur les péchés capitaux (1949) and Pierre le magnifique (1952). In 1961, he formed his own advertising firm, la Société Dubuisson. In 1972, he became chief executive officer and publisher of La Presse (1972-198l). He published his memoirs, La Culotte en or (1980), and a sequel to Les Plouffe, Le Crime d'Ovide Plouffe (1982). Roger Lemelin was made a Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur by the government of France in 1990, and received an honorary doctorate from McGill University for the body of his work in the same year. He was a member of the Royal Society of Canada and a corresponding member of l'Académie Goncourt.

    Scope and Content: The Roger Lemelin fonds contains correspondence, manuscripts of unpublished novels, manuscripts of Les Plouffe, Au pied de la pente douce, Pierre le magnifique and the radio serial La Famille Plouffe, articles and press clippings. A second accession [1987-10] added correspondence and research notes, typescripts, and scripts for television and the film versions of Les Plouffe, La Culotte en or and Le Crime d'Ovide Plouffe.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from the author [1981-03, 1987-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

Leprohon, Rosanna

  • Lightburn, Ron

    Ron Lightburn fonds. - 1991-1999. - 8 boxes of graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Ron Lightburn was born in Cobourg, Ontario, but grew up in West Vancouver. He always loved to draw and in his early years he produced his own comic books which he sold to classmates at his elementary school. Later he studied at the Alberta College of Art in Calgary, then settled in Victoria and worked as a commercial illustrator and gallery artist. Lightburn passed the Orca Book Publishers office hundreds of times on his way to his local art supply store before stopping one day to ask about picture books. Within a few weeks he was working on the award-winning Waiting for the Whales (1991). Lightburn went on to produce illustrations for other well-received children's books including Eagle Dreams (1994), Driftwood Cove (1998), and How Smudge Came (1995).

    In 1992, Lightburn received the Governor General's Literary Award for Children's Literature, the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Award and the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award for Waiting for the Whales. In 1995, he received the Mr. Christie's Book Award (for best English book age 7 and under) and in 1996 the Sheila A. Egoff Children's Book Prize for How Smudge Came.

    Scope and Content: The Ron Lightburn fonds contains sketches; mock-ups, preparatory material and photographs; as well as final illustrations for How Smudge Came, Eagle Dreams and Driftwood Cove.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ron Lightburn in 1992 and 1999. [1992-27, 1999-06]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none

    Finding Aid: box list available.

Lighthall, William Douw

  • Lunn, Janet

    Janet Lunn fonds. - 1962-1991. - 4 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Author of children's books, editor, and reviewer, Janet Lunn was born in Dallas, Texas in 1928. She came to Canada in 1946, studied at Queen's University (1947-1950), and was nearly 40 when she published her first book, The County, a history of Prince Edward County in Ontario. Lunn writes novels for young adults (often in historical settings), non-fiction about Canadian heroes and history, and has contributed text to several children's picture books. She was the children's editor for Clark, Irwin Publishers from 1972 to 1975, free-lance reviewer for other Canadian publishing houses, and lectured across the country on children's literature. She has adapted a fairy tale, Twelve Dancing Princesses, which was named one of the 10 best children's books of 1979 by the Canadian Library Association. Among her other honours, she has received the Vicki Metcalf Award for the body of her work from the Canadian Authors Association (1981), and the Book of the Year for Children Medal by the Canadian Library Association in 1981 for The Root Cellar.

    Scope and Content: The Janet Lunn fonds consists of correspondence both personal and professional, drafts of all of her published works to date (including the recent The Story of Canada co-written with Christopher Moore), and her unpublished short stories. Also included are photographs, letters from readers, articles, reviews and promotional material.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Janet Lunn in 1992. [1992-20]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Lysenko, Vera

 

M

Macbeth, Madge

  • MacLennan, J. Munro

    J. Munro MacLennan fonds. - 1939-1980. - 90 cm of textual record and other materials.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, playwright, translator and public servant, Munro MacLennan was born in Evanton, Scotland in 1900. In 1927, he immigrated to Canada and worked for the Canadian Wildlife Service and the Department of Northern Affairs in Ottawa. He wrote poetry and produced two plays: MacBeth of Venice was presented at the Ottawa Little Theatre in 1937, and Pipistrelle of Aquitaine won first place in the 1938 Playwriting Competition. The latter was produced across Canada and is included in the Ryerson Press anthology Canadian School Plays.

    Scope and Content: The J. Munro MacLennan fonds includes manuscripts, correspondence (primarily with publishers and with literary colleagues in his role as president of the Canadian Authors' Association), clippings, theatre programs and photographs.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from Mrs. J. M. MacLennan in 1982. [1982-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • MacDonald, Elizabeth Roberts

    Elizabeth Roberts MacDonald fonds. - 1903-1922. - [ca. 128 leaves]; bound.

    Biographical Sketch: Jane Elizabeth Gostwycke Roberts MacDonald, the sister of Sir Charles G.D. Roberts, was born in the Rectory of Westcock, New Brunswick in 1864. She married Samuel Archibald Roberts MacDonald in 1896 and lived in Fredericton, New Brunswick, in Nelson, British Columbia and in Ottawa, Ontario. She was the author of Our Little Canadian Cousin (1904) and was co-author with W.C. Roberts and T.G. Roberts of Northland Lyrics (1899).

    Scope and Content: The volume contains manuscripts of MacDonald's poems. The place and date of writing are recorded for most poems and the date and place of publication are indicated for published poems.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from a private collector. [1987-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: none.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Roberts family fonds LMS-0127 [1986-02].

MacDonald, Wilson

MacLeod, Alistair

MacMillan, George Boyd

MacNeill, Penzie

Macpherson, Jay

Malenfant, Paul Chanel (in French only)

Maltman, Kim and Roo Borson

  • Mappin, John

    John Mappin fonds. - 1969-1976. - 4 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Antiquarian bookseller, publisher and reviewer, John Mappin was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1926. Mappin sold books and manuscripts to many Canadian institutions during the years when Canadiana collections were being established.

    Scope and Content: This fonds complements the Bernard Amtmann and Canada Book Auctions fonds, providing the opportunity for scholarly and bibliographical research in the history of the book and book collecting. It includes client correspondence, reviews and other writings, business records such as lists of books offered for sale, sales records and purchase records.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from John Mappin in 1997. [1997-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary box list available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Bernard Amtmann fonds LMS-0036 [1976-01, 1989-01, 1993-03] and Canada Book Auctions fonds LMS-0097 [1983-16].

  • Marcel, Jean

    Jean Marcel fonds. - 1970-1990. - 80 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Essayist, literary critic, novelist and poet Jean Marcel, was born Jean-Marcel Paquette in Montreal, Quebec in 1941. He holds a doctorate in medieval literature from the Université de Poitiers (1968) and is now on the teaching staff at Université Laval. He became known as a talented essayist for his work Jacques Ferron malgré lui (1970), followed by Le Joual de Troie (1973), in which he reflected on the French language in Quebec. His next literary work was the translation and adaptation of classic works such as La Chanson de Roland (1980) and Le Chant de Gilgamesh (1979). In 1989, he published the first volume of his Triptyque des temps perdus: Hypatie ou la fin des dieux (1989), followed by Jérôme ou de la traduction (1990) and Sidoine ou la dernière fête (1993). He received the Prix France-Québec for Le Joual de Troie in 1974 and the Molson Prize for Hypatie ou la fin des dieux in 1989.

    Scope and Content: The Jean Marcel fonds contains typescripts with handwritten corrections and additions; and research notes for essays written by Jean Marcel.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Jean Marcel in 1993. [1993-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Markoosie

    Harpoon of the Hunter collection. - [ca. 1969]. - 73 leaves of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer, pilot and translator, Markoosie Patsauq was born on the east coast of Hudson Bay in Inukjuak, Quebec in 1942 and attended high school in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. His book The Harpoon of the Hunter (1970) describes a young boy's initiation into manhood. Markoosie first published his story in the Native newsletter Inuttituut and later translated it for English readers. In 1971, Markoosie was invited by Jean Chrétien, then Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, to join the board of Panarctic Oils Limited, the federal government private industry exploration syndicate. Since 1978, he has worked as an administrator of public services for the Government of Quebec.

    Scope and Content: The manuscript of The Harpoon of the Hunter is written in Inuit syllabic characters without finals and includes a four-page typescript (carbon) of the foreword by James McNeill, Cultural Development Division, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. Publication of The Harpoon of the Hunter was an experiment in computerized composition, using an optical character-recognition system.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Department of Indian Affairs in 1971. [1971-04]

    Language: material is in Inuktitut and English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: none.

  • Marlatt, Daphne

    Daphne Marlatt fonds. - 1951-1998. - 14.74 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Daphne Marlatt (née Buckle) was born in Melbourne, Australia in 1942 to English parents who were evacuated from Malaya as a result of the Japanese occupation. She spent her early childhood in Penang, Malaysia. In 195l, her family immigrated to Vancouver. She studied English literature at the University of British Columbia (B.A., 1964) where she participated in a variety of literary activities and contributed poetry and editorial expertise to the experimental periodical tish. She completed her M.A. in Comparative Literature at Indiana University in 1968, and for her thesis she translated and wrote a critical essay on Francis Pongé. That same year Ryerson Press published her first book of poetry Frames: Of a Story, written in experimental language and form.

    Marlatt's development as a writer is closely related to her other occupations and preoccupations, such as her involvement in oral-history projects in Steveston and Vancouver's east end. The CBC adapted her documentary publication Steveston Recollected: A Japanese-Canadian History (1975) as a radio drama and asked her to write the script. She was poetry editor for Capilano Review (1973-1976), co-editor for the prose magazine Periodics (1977-1980), Island magazine, and founding co-editor of Tessera, a feminist journal. Her many published titles and numerous contributions to Canadian anthologies and periodicals have given Marlatt a strong and recognizable voice in West Coast literature in particular and in Canadian literature in general. Her published works include Rings (1971), Vancouver Poems (1972), Steveston (1974), Our Lives (1975), Zocalo (1977), What Matters (1980) and Here & There (1981). Her How Hug a Stone (1983) chronicles the journey she took with her son, Kit, to England to explore her mother's roots. In this work, as in Touch to My Tongue (1984), Marlatt articulates her own consciousness in the making through the writing process. Other notable works include the partly-autobiographical Ana Historic (1988), Salvage (1991), Taken (1996) and Readings from the Labyrinth (1998), a collection of her essays. Marlatt edited Mothertalk (1997), Roy Kiyooka's biographical work about his mother's experience as an immigrant to Canada. Marlatt was instrumental in organizing the Canadian literary conference "Women and Words / Les femmes et les mots" held at the University of British Columbia in 1998.

    Scope and Content: The Daphne Marlatt fonds includes research notes, manuscripts and typescripts of published and unpublished works; photographs and memorabilia; publicity material; publications; juvenilia; diaries, notebooks and correspondence. Also, there are over 50  audio tapes of readings, interviews and speeches given by Marlatt and other contemporary writers. The fonds includes correspondence with Frank Davey, Clayton Eshleman, David Alexander, Michael Ondaatje, Janice Williamson, Nicole Brossard, Penn Kemp, bp Nichol and other literary colleagues and publishers; and editorial correspondence for the periodicals Periodics (1977-1982), Island magazine, and Tessera. The manuscript material found in the fonds includes manuscripts and research material for Marlatt's published works of fiction, as well as drafts of her earlier publications; contributions to periodicals and anthologies; reviews; lectures and tributes. The fonds also contains documentation concerning festivals and conferences (West Coast Women and Words and B.C. Pen); documentation of the creation of Mothertalk and documentation of teaching activities and creative-writing workshops.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Daphne Marlatt in 1985, 1993 and 1998. [1985-08, 1993-13, 1998-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: researchers must have the permission of Daphne Marlatt before consulting the fonds.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available for all accessions.

  • Marshall, Tom

    Tom Marshall fonds. - 1961-1992. - 12 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, novelist, critic and editor, Tom Marshall, was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario in 1938 and lived in the United States during his childhood. He received a B.A. in History (1961) and an M.A. in English (1965) from Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario where he completed his thesis on A.M. Klein. He began teaching at Queen's in 1964. His interest in poetry led to involvement in editing the student literary magazine Quarry and to the position as poetry editor for the Canadian Forum. Marshall published six books of poetry between 1969 and 1980 and prepared critical works on D.H. Lawrence and A.M. Klein, as well as a series of critical essays on major Canadian writers collected as Harsh and Lovely Land: The Major Canadian Poets and the Making of a Canadian Tradition (1978). His Playing with Fire (1984) and Dance of the Particles (1984) are lyrical long poems depicting spiritual themes. He produced several psychological novels Adele at the End of the Day (1987), Changelings: A Double Fugue (1991) and Goddess Disclosing (1992) in which he explored ecological and feminist themes. His collections of essays Ghost Safari (1990) and Multiple Exposures: Promised Lands (1992) are reflections on the lives and works of contemporary Canadian poets and fiction writers. Marshall died in Kingston, Ontario in 1993.

    Scope and Content: The Tom Marshall fonds includes manuscripts and typescripts for his poetic, fictional and scholarly works, including: The Beast with Three Backs; The Silences of Fire; A.M. Klein; The Psychic Mariner: A Reading of the Poems of D. H. Lawrence; Magic Water; The Earth Book; Rosemary Goal; Harsh and Lovely Land; The Elements: Poems 1960-1975; Glass Houses; Adele at the End of the Day and Voices on the Brink. Also included are research notes for Marshall's poetry, novels, criticism and reviews. The fonds includes correspondence received while Marshall was editor for Quarry Press (1965-1966) and poetry editor for the Canadian Forum (1973-1978); the fonds also includes his professional and literary correspondence from Canadian writers and critics including Northrop Frye, Michael Ondaatje, Dorothy Livesay and Al Purdy, among many others. The fonds also includes book posters, book jackets, broadsides, photographs, audiovisual items and memorabilia.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The first accession was received from Tom Marshall in 1985, the second in 1989, and subsequent accessions were received from the Estate of Tom Marshall in 1993. [1985-14, 1989-09, 1993-10, 1993-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available for first two accessions.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Tom Eadie fonds LMS-0142 [1987-13].

  • Martin, Claire

    Claire Martin fonds. - 1956-1970. - 2.25 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Claire Martin was born in Quebec City, Quebec in 1914 and educated at the Ursuline convent and by the Dames de la Congrégation. She was first a secretary and later a host at CKCV radio station (Québec) and Radio-Canada (Montreal). In 1945, she married Roland Faucher, moved to Ottawa and became a full-time writer. She published a number of novels including Avec ou sans amour, which won the Prix du Cercle du Livre de France in 1958, Dans un gant de fer, which won the Governor General's Literary Award and the Prix du Concours littéraire du Québec in 1966, La Joue droite (1966) and Moi, je n'étais qu'espoir (1972). She became President of the Société des écrivains canadiens-français in 1962 and a member of the Royal Society of Canada in 1967. After ten years in France, she returned to Quebec in 1982. In 1984, she was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Scope and Content: The Claire Martin fonds contains typescripts of Dans un gant de fer and La Joue droite, the manuscript and typescript of the translation of Le Harpon du chasseur by Markoosie, correspondence and press clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Claire Martin in 1970 and 1986. [1970-03, 1986-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: a few restrictions governing access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

    Associated Material: the Claire Martin fonds at the Centre for Research on French-Canadian Culture at the University of Ottawa (P16).

Mason, Ellsworth Godwin

  • Matras, Jean

    Jean Matras sculptures. - [ca. 1989]. - 2 sculptures; 28 cm by 42 cm by 33 cm.

    Biographical Sketch: Jean Matras is of French origin and lives in New York where he works for the United Nations. He sold his sculptures to May Cutler of Tundra Books, the publisher of the books represented by the sculptures.

    Scope and Content: These sculptures represent scenes from Roch Carrier's book The Hockey Sweater, illustrated by Sheldon Cohen and from Dayal Kaur Khalsa's book I Want a Dog.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: purchased from May Cutler, Tundra Books. [1991-10, 1993-17]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: none

Mayne, Seymour

McCrae collection, John

McGillicuddy family

McKay, Don

McLachlan, Alexander

  • Meigs, Mary

    Mary Meigs fonds. - 1963-1980. - 26 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer, painter and illustrator Mary Meigs was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1917. Through Edmund Wilson, she met Marie-Claire Blais in the early 1960s, in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Meigs has written two autobiographies: Lily Briscoe, a Self-Portrait: An Autobiography (1981) and The Medusa Head (1983). She also published a collection of her family's letters The Box Closet (1987). She illustrated some of Marie-Claire Blais's work: Illustrations for Two Novels by Marie-Claire Blais: Manuscripts of Pauline Archange; À cœur joual and Une Saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel: roman.

    Scope and Content: The Mary Meigs fonds illustrates her life and her relationship with Marie-Claire Blais. This fonds consists of her book Illustrations for Two Novels by Marie-Claire Blais; poetry and correspondence between Meigs and Marie-Claire Blais; drawings, including several sketches of a portrait of Marie-Claire Blais; miscellaneous and notebooks.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Mary Meigs in 1989. [1989-15]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the Mary-Meigs fonds at the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec (MSS-418).

Merril, Judith

Montgomery, L.M.

  • Montigny, Louvigny de

    Louvigny de Montigny fonds. - 1904-1955. - 90 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer and senior translator for the Senate in Ottawa, Louvigny de Montigny was born in Saint-Jerôme, Quebec in 1876. He was educated at Collège Sainte-Marie and in the Faculty of Law at Université Laval in Québec. He founded two newspapers: Les Débats (1900) and La Gazette municipale (1904). He was an editor with Les Débats and from 1910 to 1955 a translator in the Senate. He was a founding member of the École littéraire de Montréal and played a significant role in the creation of the Canadian Authors' Association (1921) and the Société des écrivains canadiens (1922). In 1914, he brought Louis Hémon's novel Maria Chapdelaine to public attention, after discovering it in the Parisian newspaper Le Temps, in which it was published in instalments. His book La Revanche de Maria Chapdelaine, was acclaimed by the Académie française in 1937. He published works of poetry, and his essay Au pays de Québec, was awarded the Prix de la Langue française by the Académie française in 1945. His comedy Les Boules de neige, brought to the stage the quarrel over the use of popular language in literary works. His other works are La Langue française au Canada: son état actuel (1916) and Écrasons le perroquet: divertissement philologique (1948) both of which deal with the problem of the French language in Canada, a topic which interested Louvigny de Montigny more than any other. He was named Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur in 1925.

    Scope and Content: The Louvigny de Montigny fonds consists mainly of correspondence, typescripts of La Cabane à sucre, L'Épi rouge and Le Rigodon du diable, press clippings and also contains the series concerning his brother, Gaston de Montigny.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Mme Raimbaud de Montigny in 1971. [1971-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restriction: none.

    Finding Aid: inventory available. Also available on microfilm (one negative reel and one positive reel).

  • Moodie family

    Moodie, Strickland, Vickers, Ewing family fonds. - 1821-1949. - 2.5 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Susanna Moodie (née Strickland) was born near Suffolk, England in 1803, one of six Strickland daughters, five of whom became writers. Susanna began writing at an early age, mainly about heroic historical figures and stories for children and adolescents. She immigrated to Canada in the spring of 1832 with her husband, Lt. John Wedderburn Dunbar Moodie, where they settled on a land-grant north of present-day Lakefield, Ontario in 1834. She wrote serialized fiction for the Literary Garland magazine and co-edited with her husband the Victoria Magazine (1847-1848). She is best known for Roughing It in the Bush: Or, Life in Canada (1852), her autobiographical account of the difficult adaptation from England to Canada which has become an enduring classic in Canadian literature of immigration and settlement.

    The Moodie, Strickland, Vickers, Ewing family fonds was acquired from the estate of Patrick Hamilton Ewing, the great-great-grandson of Susanna and J.W. Dunbar Moodie. After a career in London, England, and an active role in the Resistance Movement during the war, Patrick Hamilton Ewing settled in New York State. Upon the death of his grandmother, Ethel Vickers Ewing, the collection of family papers that Ethel had inherited from her mother, Catherine Moodie Vickers (eldest daughter of Susanna Moodie), was shipped to Ewing's home and stored undisturbed in his attic. After Ewing's death in 1986, the collection was offered to the National Library of Canada.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains correspondence (171 letters) mainly from the Strickland sisters to family members in Canada; from Donald Moodie to his brother and letters exchanged between Susanna and J.W. Dunbar Moodie; manuscripts of Susanna and J.W. Dunbar Moodie; original watercolours by Susanna and one portrait of Susanna; photographs; clippings and memorabilia. The collection concerns principally Susanna Strickland Moodie, John Wedderburn Dunbar Moodie and their families.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Estate of Patrick Hamilton Ewing in 1987 and 1992. [1987-07, 1992-13]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: access to fragile originals is limited.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Moodie, J.W Dunbar

Moodie, Susanna

  • Morency, Pierre

    Pierre Morency fonds. - 1963-1989. - 1.30 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer, poet and playwright Pierre Morency was born in Lauzon, Quebec (Lévis County) in 1942. He obtained his B.A. at the Collège de Lévis in 1963 and his teaching diploma from the Université Laval in 1966. From 1963 to 1968, he taught in Lévis, where he founded and directed the Théâtre étudiant de Lévis (1961-1964). As a storyteller and author of a number of plays and short comedies for Radio-Canada radio, he created more than 200 literary and comedy programs, including Le Repos du guerrier and Bestiaire de l'été. He published a collection of his poetry, Poèmes de la froide merveille de vivre, which won the Du Maurier Award in 1968. Morency founded a poetry journal Inédits, for which he acted as director (1969-71), and he helped found the poetry journal Estuaire in 1976. A sparkling host, he ran numerous poetry evenings, les Soirées poétiques du Chantauteuil, in Quebec City (1969-1970) and elsewhere in the province. His awards include the 1975 Prix Claude-Sernet (Rodez, France) for the body of his work, the Prix de l'Institut canadien de Québec for the body of his work in 1979, the Prix Québec-Paris in 1988, the Prix Ludger-Duvernay in 1991, and the Prix France-Québec in 1992. In 1993, Morency was made a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres de la République française.

    Scope and Content: The Pierre Morency fonds documents the multimedia career of this writer who is known primarily as a poet and ornithologist. It contains correspondence, manuscripts and typescripts of poetry, theatre, radio plays, narratives and radio scripts; also documented are awards, literary events, speeches and articles.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1990 and 1993. [1990-11, 1993-19]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restriction: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

Morley, Patricia

  • Mouré, Erin

    Erin Mouré fonds. - 1973-1990. - 7 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet Erin Mouré was born in Calgary, Alberta in 1955. She studied briefly at universities in Calgary and British Columbia, and has lived in Montreal since 1985. Mouré worked as a CN/Via Rail employee and as an editor and translator. Her first book of poetry Empire, York Street (1979) was nominated for a Governor General's Literary Award. She received the Du Maurier Award twice for poetry (1982, 1993), the Pat Lowther Memorial Award for Domestic Fuel (1985) and a Governor General's Literary Award for Furious (1989). Of her more recent works Search Procedures (1996) was a finalist for the Governor General's Literary Award and WSW (West South West) (1989) won the QSPELL Award. Mouré recently published a book-length poem Pillage Laud (1998).

    Scope and Content: The Erin Mouré fonds includes typescripts and proofs, as well as the editorial correspondence and contracts for nine published books of poetry, short stories and essays written between 1973 and 1990. The fonds contains literary and personal correspondence (some between Erin Mouré and Bronwen Wallace from the period 1985 to 1987); notebooks; drafts of poems; journal entries; sketches and drawings; and copies of periodicals in which Mouré's work has been published.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Erin Mouré in 1997. [1997-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary list available.

 

N

  • National Library of Canada (Read Up On It fonds)

    Read Up On It fonds / Fonds Lisez sur le sujet. - 1994-1996 - 3 illustrations.

    Administrative History: Read Up On It /Lisez sur le sujet is the National Library of Canada's annual program to promote Canadian books and reading. First suggested by the Book and Periodical Development Council, the publishing industry's umbrella organization, the project was launched with CBC Television as a pilot in 1988. In subsequent years other partners and sponsors have participated with the National Library in this program: the National Literacy Secretariat, Canada Post Corporation, the Canadian Federation of University Women, the Canadian Children's Book Centre, Communication-Jeunesse, Access Network, Télé-Québec, TFO and YTV.

    The Read Up On It kit, created by the National Library in both English and French, is targeted at parents, teachers and librarians who work with children. The kit aims to foster a love of reading and a knowledge of Canadian books among children and young people; to create an awareness of Canadian books for children and young people; and to acknowledge the achievement of Canadian illustrators, authors and publishers. The television public-service announcements complement the kit and help to promote the program.

    Scope and Content: The Read Up On It fonds includes the original artwork for the posters and publicity kits for the 1994, 1995 and 1996 programs. The National Library commissioned Canadian illustrators of children's books to create artwork to be used for the Read Up On It publicity. Marie-Louise Gay created the original illustration for the 1994 kit cover and poster; Nicola Morgan created the illustration for 1995; and Gilles Pelletier created the illustration for 1996.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The original illustrations were transferred to the Literary Manuscript Collection in 1996. [1996-07]

    Restrictions: No restrictions on access. Reproduction requires permission of the artists.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

O

  • Ondaatje, Michael

    Michael Ondaatje fonds. - 1962-1993. - 24 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Michael Ondaatje was born in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in 1943. He studied in Colombo, England, and in Canada at Bishop's University, the University of Toronto (B.A., 1965) and Queen's University (M.A., 1967). Ondaatje's earliest works were poetry: The Dainty Monsters (1967), and The Man with Seven Toes (1969). These were followed by The Collected Works of Billy the Kid: Left-Handed Poems (1970) and There's a Trick with a Knife I'm Learning to Do (1979) which both received the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry. As in Billy the Kid, his Coming through Slaughter (1976), explores the relationship between art and life through his fictionalized account of the life of Charles "Buddy" Bolden (1876-1931). His ostensibly autobiographical, Running in the Family (1982), is a collection of interrelated sketches, stories, poems and photographs that renders a fictionalized portrait of his family history in Sri Lanka. His tendency to blur the boundaries between reality, fiction and legend is seen in his semi-historical impressionistic novel about Toronto in the 1920s In the Skin of the Lion (1987), which won the Trillium Book Award in 1988. Notable works of poetry include Ondaatje's most ambitious work in verse Secular Love (1984) and The Cinnamon Peeler: Selected Poems (1990). Ondaatje has published several books of criticism, including Leonard Cohen (1970) and has anthologized the stories of Munro, Wiebe, Thomas and Blaise in Personal Fictions (1977), and Canadian short fiction in From Ink Lake (1990). Influenced by the visual arts and by film, he has produced several films, including Sons of Captain Poetry (1970) about bp Nichol and The Clinton Special (1976), a film about Theatre Passe Muraille's The Farm Show. He was associated with Coach House Press beginning in 1966, and served as a member of the board of directors and an editor. He is currently editor, with Linda Spalding, of Brick: A Literary Journal which publishes literary essays, interviews, poetry and excerpts from novels.

    Ondaatje gained international recognition with his highly acclaimed novel The English Patient (1992), for which he was the first Canadian to win the prestigious Booker Prize (1992). The English Patient was made into a movie, directed by Anthony Minghella and produced by Saul Zaentz, in 1996 and it won nine Academy Awards, including the Oscar for Best Film. Since 1971, Ondaatje has taught literature and creative writing at the Glendon College campus of York University, Toronto.

    Scope and Content: The Michael Ondaatje fonds includes research notes; manuscripts and typescripts for Dainty Monsters, The Man with Seven Toes, The Collected Works of Billy the Kid, Rat Jelly, Coming through Slaughter, There's a Trick with a Knife I'm Learning to Do, and Running in the Family; minutes of Coach House Press board meetings; manuscripts; galleys of publications edited by Ondaatje; cassette tapes; film; script notes; research notes; financial records for films made by Ondaatje; clippings and memorabilia. The third accession includes research notes, manuscripts, typescripts, drafts, proofs, publicity and reviews for In the Skin of a Lion (1987). Correspondence in this accession is with publishers and readers covering the period 1985 to 1993.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the Michael Ondaatje in several instalments between 1985 and 1993. [1985-03, 1987-15, 1990-02, 1993-11]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: researchers must have the permission of Michael Ondaatje before consulting this fonds.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Oolichan Books

    Oolichan Books fonds. - 1974-1996. - 35.4 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Administrative History: Oolichan Books came into being in 1974 when Ron Smith requested sponsorship from Malaspina College in Nanaimo, British Columbia to set up a literary press and was granted temporary use of the College's facilities. A successful grant application to the Canada Council in the following year enabled the Press to operate independently. Consequently it moved to Lantzville, British Columbia, a small seaside village on Vancouver Island, where Oolichan Books has remained. Oolichan launched its publishing program with the works of four West Coast writers: David Day, Robert Kroetsch, Kevin Roberts and Robin Skelton. Although primarily geared to publishing poetry and fiction, Oolichan expanded its focus to works of regional and national importance, as well as a few children's titles. Notable publications include Tommy Douglas Speaks (1979), a collection of selected speeches. Other works co-published with the Institute for Research on Public Policy in 1988 include a series on Native issues and two books on Quebec's future in Canada. In 1994, two partners joined Oolichan: Jay Connolly as production manager and fiction editor, and Rhonda Bailey as managing editor and publisher. Ron Smith continues as co-publisher and poetry editor. Despite its size and limited means, Oolichan has earned a reputation for well-designed and well-edited publications. Currently, Oolichan Books advertises itself as a small literary press publishing fiction and poetry.

    Biographical Sketch: Professor, publisher and writer, Ron Smith was born in Vancouver, British Columbia (B.C.) in 1943. He studied English literature at Leeds University (M.A. in 1970), and returned to Vancouver Island in 1971 to a teaching position with the English Department at Malaspina College in Nanaimo, B.C. Apart from teaching and running Oolichan Books, Smith reviewed books and edited the successful anthology of West Coast short fiction Rainshadow Stories from Vancouver Island (1982).

    Scope and Content: The Oolichan Books fonds includes financial records; author files; typescripts, galleys, page proofs, and art work for each published book including limited and special editions; and catalogues of Oolichan titles. The fonds also includes papers documenting Ron Smith's personal literary career, his student writing, poetry, drafts, fiction, non-fiction, manuscripts and correspondence. The second accession contains correspondence with George Woodcock, Daphne Marlatt, Earle Birney, Dorothy Livesay, George Bowering, Jack Hodgins, among others. The third accession includes business files for activity up to 1994.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Ron Smith in 1985, 1990 and 1996. [1985-02, 1990-06, 1996-03]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession.

  • Ouellette, Fernand

    Fernand Ouellette fonds. - 1953-1989. - 10 m of textual record and sound recordings.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, essayist and novelist Fernand Ouellette was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1930. He began his classical studies at Collège Séraphique de Montréal in 1943, and obtained a social sciences diploma from the Université de Montréal in 1952. From 1955 on, he wrote a number of radio scripts on French and foreign writers for Radio-Canada. In 1958, he became the co-founder of the journal Liberté, and its editor-in-chief in 1960. In the same year, he began producing cultural programs for Radio-Canada, continuing until 1991. His correspondence with Henry Miller and Pierre Jean Jouve, his meeting with Edgard Varèse and his travels in Europe are all signposts of his journey as a writer and poet. He has won a number of literary awards. His biographical essay Vie d'Edgard Varèse, won the Prix France-Québec in 1967. Poésie won the Prix France-Canada in 1972. Les Actes retrouvés earned him a Governor General's Literary Award in 1970 which he refused: Fernand Ouellette explained this refusal in "Le temps des veilleurs" [in Liberté (Jan.-Feb. 1971)]. He won two Governor General's Literary Awards, one in 1985 for his novel Lucie ou Un Midi en novembre and one in 1987 for his collection Les Heures. He was honoured three times for the body of his work, winning the Prix Athanase-David in 1987, the Ville de Laval Medal in 1992, and the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste's Prix Duvernay in 1994. Ouellette led creative writing workshops at the University of Ottawa and Université Laval in 1977 and 1978, and at a number of universities abroad. He has also participated in numerous international symposia.

    Scope and Content: The Fernand Ouellette fonds contains correspondence, manuscripts and typescripts of his literary works and radio scripts, documentation on the author's activities, course notes and audio archives.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Fernand Ouellette in three accessions. [1985-13, 1990-08, 1998-03]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions governing access. No reproduction without Mr. Ouellette's authorization.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: The National Library of Canada, Music Division, holds all documents pertaining to the biography of musician Edgard Varèse in the Fernand Ouellette fonds (MUS 137).

 

P

Pacey, Desmond

Packard, Frank L.

Packard, Marguerite Pearl

Page, P.K.

  • Paré, Roger

    Roger Paré fonds. - [1985] - 25 ink and watercolour illustrations.

    Biographical Sketch: Children's book illustrator and author Roger Paré was born in Ville Marie (Témiscamingue), Quebec in 1929. His interest in drawing and painting developed while he was at school. He worked at Radio-Canada as an illustrator of songs and stories for children's programs such as La Boîte à surprise, Bobino, Une Fenêtre dans ma tête, Le Jardin de Pierrot, and La Boîte aux letters. He became an author and illustrator of works for children in the early 1980s, creating exceptional book-games such as L'Alphabet, which earned him the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize, French language, for illustration in 1985. L'Alphabet and Les Chiffres were translated into German and distributed in the United States and in Europe.

    Scope and Content: The Roger Paré fonds consists of 25 ink and watercolour illustrations for the book-game, L'Alphabet, published in 1985 by Éditions de la courte échelle.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Roger Paré in 1995.
    [1995-03]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: list of illustrations available.

Parker, Gilbert

  • Peterborough Mechanics Institute

    The Peterborough Mechanics' Institute fonds. - 1868-1940. - 1 m of textual record.

    Administrative History: The Peterborough Mechanics' Institute, later the Peterborough Public Library in Peterborough, Ontario, began as a subscription library and reading room operated by the local Mechanics Institute. The Institute provided evening classes, lectures and library facilities to support the technical education and spiritual growth of working-class men. Robert Romaine, editor of the Peterborough Review, held the job of librarian and by 1858, the collection contained 950 books and a weekly circulation of 100 newspapers and periodicals to 140 subscribers.

    In 1868, the Ontario government offered grants to chartered mechanics' institutes and the Peterborough Association applied for and received official incorporation. To be eligible for government funding, institutes were required to maintain significant scientific and technical collections and to provide evening classes and lectures. "Light" publications, such as works of fiction, were not considered eligible acquisitions, and were purchased with monies raised from local sources. By 1888, the library of the Peterborough Mechanics' Institute maintained an extensive and varied collection of more than 5 000 volumes and 40 periodicals for the use of its 350 members.

    In 1880, administration of mechanics' institutes, previously within the Bureau of Agriculture, was taken over by the Department of Education. In 1883, the Ontario Free Public Libraries Act enabled the conversion of many larger Mechanics' Institutes into public libraries. Additional legislation in 1895 allowed the change in title, and the Peterborough Mechanics' Institute officially became the Peterborough Public Library.

    Scope and Content: The Peterborough Mechanics' Institute fonds contains the minutes of meetings, proposals for programs, courses, lectures, acquisition data and records of the Institute's operation, physical operation of the library, financial information and correspondence. Also included are ephemera such as lecture advertisements, 19th century booksellers' catalogues, assorted circulars, invoices, etc.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from David Ewens Books in 1995. [1995-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Phelan, Josephine

    Josephine Phelan fonds. - 1922-1980. - 45 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Librarian and writer, Josephine Phelan was born in Hamilton, Ontario in 1905. She earned an honours degree in modern history (B.A., 1926) and a M.A. in history from the University of Toronto. She attended the Ontario College of Education, taught high school briefly, and went on to work for a couple of publishing houses in Montreal. She obtained her degree in library science from the University of Toronto in 193l, and embarked on a 12-year career with the Toronto Public Library (1943-1965). While working as a librarian, Phelan began writing stories for young people, scholarly articles and biographical studies. Her first important work of historical fiction The Ardent Exile: The Life and Times of D'Arcy McGee (195l), won a Governor General's Literary Award for creative non-fiction and the University of British Columbia's Medal for Popular Biography. Other publications include The Boy Who Ran Away (1954), and The Bold Heart: The Story of Father Lacombe (1956).

    Scope and Content: The Josephine Phelan fonds documents her private life. The fonds includes manuscripts of unpublished novels and short stories, diaries, family photographs, sketch books and correspondence with Norah Story (1902-1978) and Paul Martin (1903- ), among others. There are no manuscripts of her published works or documents concerning her career as a librarian.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the family of Josephine Phelan. [1982-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Poetry Canada Review

    Poetry Canada Review fonds. - 1979-1994. - 6 m of textual record and other material.

    Administrative History: A successful "little magazine" Poetry Canada Review was founded in 1979 by Clifton Whiten in order to publish and review poetry from across Canada. In its first five years Poetry Canada Review endeavoured to reach a paying audience, to establish a reputation among Canadian writers, and to fund itself without government assistance. In 1979, after a frustrating five years but knowing that he had shaped a vital little Canadian magazine, Whiten sold Poetry Canada Review to ECW Press.

    Biographical Sketch: The founder and editor of Poetry Canada Review, Clifton Whiten, was born in Vernon, British Columbia in 1939. He worked as a reporter for the Penticton Herald and as a poetry editor before settling into a career as a high-school English teacher. In the meantime, he wrote and published his own poetry, Putting the Birthdate into Perspective (1969), among other works. He left teaching in 1979 to pursue his literary career and founded the literary press, Sandpiper Press, and the literary periodical, Poetry Canada Review.

    Scope and Content

    The Poetry Canada Review fonds contains correspondence with contributors, financial records, proofs, photographs, and cassette tapes of interviews and readings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The first and third accessions were received from Clifton Whiten in 1985 and 1999, and the second accession was acquired from ECW press in 1995. [1985-07, 1995-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession.

  • Poulin, Jacques

    Jacques Poulin fonds. - 1967-1989. - 93 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist and translator, Jacques Poulin was born in Saint-Gédéon de Beauce, Quebec in 1937. He was classically educated at seminaries in Saint-Georges and Nicolet, graduating in 1957. He obtained a psychology degree specializing in occupational guidance (1960) and an arts degree (1964) from Université Laval. He worked as a guidance counsellor at Collège Notre-Dame-de-Bellevue in Québec (1967-1970) while completing Mon Cheval pour un royaume (1967), then he worked as a federal government translator (1970-1973). After the publication of his second novel Jimmy (1969), he dedicated himself to writing. Poulin's first works were influenced by J.D. Salinger, and his strong and vigorous characters, action scenes tinged with humour, and particularly, the tendency to mix dream and reality, and to combine narration, fable and essay are also reminders of Kurt Vonnegut Jr. and Richard Brautigan. His Volkswagen blues (1984) is a voyage in time and space: French exploration in the style of the California counterculture of Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. His La Tournée d'automne (1993) is a tribute to books, heroes and readers. For the past few years, Jacques Poulin has been a writer and translator in Paris.

    Jacques Poulin won the Prix La-Presse for his novel Faites de beaux rêves (1974) and the Governor General's Literary Award for Les Grandes Marées (1978). His novel Le Vieux Chagrin won the Prix Québec-Paris in 1989, the Prix Molson of the Académie des lettres du Québec in 1990 and the Prix France-Québec in 1991. He received the Prix Athanase-David for the body of his work in 1995.

    Scope and Content: The Jacques Poulin fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts of his novels Mon Cheval pour un royaume, Jimmy, Le Cœur de la baleine bleue, Faites de beaux rêves, Les Grandes Marées, and Volkswagen blues. The second accession adds notes, manuscripts and typescripts of several versions of the novel Le Vieux Chagrin, published in 1989.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Jacques Poulin in two accessions. [1985-11, 1992-25]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restriction: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

  • Poulin, Stéphane

    Stéphane Poulin fonds. - 1986-87. - 7 drawings ; 40.5 cm by 56 cm or smaller.

    Biographical Sketch: Children's book illustrator and author Stéphane Poulin was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1961. He studied graphic arts at Collège Ahunstic, where he won an illustration award that launched his career. His work is characterized by his offbeat humour and colourful descriptions of events in his home town, Montreal. Through his work, readers glimpse Quebec, as in his bilingual alphabet primer, Ah Belle Cité!/A Beautiful City: ABC. His most popular books in the "Joséphine" series include As-tu vu Joséphine? (1986) which earned him the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize (French language) and Peux-tu attraper Joséphine? (1987) which won the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award. His other honours include the Governor General's Literary Award for illustration in 1989 for Benjamin et la saga des oreillers, the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) honour roll for Un voyage pour deux: contes et mensonges de mon enfance (1991) and the Mr. Christie's Book Award for French-language illustration for Poil de serpent, dent d'araignée (1996).

    Scope and Content: The Stéphane Poulin fonds contains seven sketches for illustrations of the book Peux-tu attraper Joséphine? with the artist's annotations from discussions with the publisher.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Stéphane Poulin in 1988. [1988-17]

    Language: annotations are in French.

    Restrictions: no restriction governing access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary list available.

Pound, Ezra

  • Prewett, Frank

    Fonds Frank-Prewett. - 1916-19[5?]. - 10 cm of textual record and photographs.

    Biographical Sketch: Frank James Prewett was born near Mount Forest, Ontario in 1893. In 1915 Prewett interrupted his studies at University College, University of Toronto and enlisted in the Canadian Army. He was severely wounded shortly after his arrival at the Front in 1916. During treatment for shell-shock, he met Seigfreid Sassoon who became a close friend and mentor, introducing Prewett to English poets and writers. Prewett's first publication, a collection of 22 poems that appeared as Hogarth pamphlet Number 17 entitled Poems (1920), included some of his "trench verse" as well as lyrical nature poems. He returned to Canada in the fall of 1919 but found it difficult to adjust, and returned to England in 1921 where he studied at Christ Church College and received his B.A. in English literature (1922). His poetry was included in the Georgian Poetry 1920-22 anthology and a second publication The Rural Scene was issued in 1922. Around 1926, Prewett ran an experimental farm near Oxford, and then took a teaching position at the Agricultural Economics Institute where he remained until the 1930s. During the 1930s, Prewett broadcast a radio show on English country life on the BBC and edited the Farmer's Weekly and other farm journals. He wrote a novel The Chazzey Tragedy (1933) which was poorly received. Prewett served in various capacities during the Second World War and remained in the Air Force until his retirement in 1954. His Collected Poems were published posthumously by Robert Graves in 1964. Additional unpublished poems were discovered in the archives of the University of Texas and resulted in the publication of The Selected Poems of Frank Prewett in 1987.

    Scope and Content: The Frank Prewett fonds consists of manuscripts of poems (including The Rural Scene, 1924), essays and a play; letters and testimonials; and photographs of drawings. A second accession [1990-20] was acquired from a British book dealer and included a bound album containing 85 autographed poems, dated 1917 to 1923. A third accession [1991-02] was acquired in 1991, consisting of six letters to Robert Graves and photographs of two drawings of Prewett in the possession of his daughter. A fourth accession [1991-13] contains Vol. VII, No. 7 of the London Mercury in which his "Lark Song" was published.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from the daughter of Frank Prewett [1990-12, 1991-02], and from Palladour Books [1990-20, 1991-13].

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Q

  • Quill & Quire

    Authors : An Exhibition of Photographs by Arnaud Maggs, Paul Orenstein and John Reeves, 1964-1983. - 73 photographs : b & w; 41 cm by 51 cm.

    Administrative History: Journal of the Canadian booktrade Quill & Quire established in 1935, is a key reviewing source, providing the earliest and most complete look at new Canadian books. Quill & Quire also publishes information about the book industry in Canada.

    Scope and Content: The photographic collection includes photographs of Canadian authors exhibited at Harbourfront Community Gallery (235 Queen's Quay West) in Toronto on August 9 to 21, 1983. The photographs were commissioned for the cover of Quill & Quire. The photos are accompanied by a leaflet about each photographer with text by Adele Freedman.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Quill & Quire in 1983. [1983-18]

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation. No reproduction of photographs is permitted.

    Finding Aid: list of authors photographed is available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: John Reeves fonds LMS-0158 [1992-04].

 

R

  • Reeves, John

    John Reeves fonds. - 1979-1992. - 15 photographs and 14 contact sheets; 41 cm by 51 cm or smaller.

    Biographical Sketch: Photographer, John Reeves was born in Burlington, Ontario in 1938. He attended the Ontario College of Art in the late 1950s where he discovered an interest and aptitude in photography. He was well established in his career as a photo-journalist by the early 1960s, working on assignment for the Canadian, the Star Weekly, Macleans and other Canadian periodicals. He is best known for his feature portraits of prominent Canadians. He has also carried out assignments for Chatelaine, Homemakers and Quest.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes photographs of Elizabeth Smart taken at The Dell, Suffolk, England, in June 1979. In 1992, the National Library acquired a collection of photographs of Canadian writers, taken between 1982 and 1992: Marie-Claire Blais, Jacques Brault, Louis Dudek, Marie-Louise Gay, Roland Giguère, Mary Meigs, Pierre Morency, Fernand Ouellette, Audrey Thomas, Michel Tremblay and Rachel Wyatt.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from John Reeves in three instalments. [1987-16, 1989-12, 1992-04]

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation. No reproduction of the photographs is permitted.

    Finding Aid: descriptive list available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Elizabeth Smart fonds LMS-0079 [1982-8, 1983-5, 1987-9]; Quill & Quire fonds LMS-0099 [1983-18].

  • Reid, Barbara

    Barbara Reid fonds. - illustrations. - [1985?] - 3 illustrations: plasticine 32 cm by 52 cm or smaller.

    Biographical Sketch: Children's illustrator, Barbara Reid was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1956. She studied at the Ontario College of Art (1980). Her unique plasticine-relief illustrations first appeared in The New Baby Calf (1984). Her next book Have You Seen Birds? (1986) won the Canada Council Children's Literature Prize for illustration, the Ruth Schwartz Children's Book Award, and the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award all in 1987. Her later creations were equally successful: the Zoe series won the Mr. Christie's Book Award in 1991 for best illustration, and Two by Two won the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award in 1993. Gifts received both the Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Award and the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) honour list in 1995. Her signature style of plasticine illustration by using scissors, combs and flattened plasticine balls, along with traditional clay techniques, creates a textured three-dimensional look.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains three of the original illustrations for Have You Seen Birds? mounted in plexiglass cases.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Barbara Reid in 1988. [1988-15]

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation; however, due to the fragility of the medium, the illustrations are not available for display.

    Finding Aid: none [not required].

  • Robert, Guy

    Guy Robert fonds. - 1968-1985. - 10.6 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet and literary and art critic Guy Robert was born in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Quebec in 1933. He was classically educated in Montreal and obtained a master's degree in literature from the Université de Montréal in 1962 for his thesis on the work of Anne Hébert, later published as La Poétique du songe (1962). In 1974, he obtained a doctorate in esthetics from the Université de Paris. (His thesis was published in 1984 under the title Art et non finito.) Since 1960, he has taught in a number of institutions, notably Collège Sainte-Marie, the École des beaux-arts at the Université de Montréal, the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières and Carleton University. As both a literary and art critic, and historian, Robert has published more than 500 articles in newspapers and periodicals, such as La Barre du jour, Vie des arts, Maintenant, Livres et auteurs québécois and Le Devoir, as well as monographs on paintings or artistic movements, and has been involved in some 500 radio and television programs.

    In 1964, he founded the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, and was its first director and curator. He was also the director of the Montreal International Sculpture Symposium in 1964 and of the international exhibition of contemporary sculpture at Expo '67. He founded Éditions du songe in 1968, and Iconia in 1975. These two companies have published many livres d'artiste, a number of which have included poetry by Guy Robert.

    Guy Robert was awarded the Grand prix littéraire de Montréal for his book Jean-Paul Lemieux (1968). His Aspects de la littérature québécoise (1970), a collection of his essays, speeches and radio presentations, includes a simultaneously serious and humorous analysis of the "sacred" in Quebec speech. Since 1983, Robert has continuously published works dealing with the lives of artists: Aux couleurs et saisons d'Armance Ricard in 1983, Domingue (1985) on Maurice Domingue; Pinsonnault (1987); L'Oeuvre de Geneviève Deslauriers (1988); Bellefleur, ou La Ferveur à l'œuvre (1988); Petit: Gaston Petit en mission itinérante dans l'art (1990); Garbs: Irma Roggenkamper Garbs, sa vie et son art (1990); DOH: visions, dimensions, messages (1991); and Dufour (1995). He pays tribute to 120 Quebec artists in his Cent vingt du cercle des artistes peintres du Québec (1989), and in his Art et non finito: esthétique et dynamogénie du non fini (1984), he analyzes the impact on the imagination of fragmented and incomplete works.

    Scope and Content: The Guy Robert fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts, proofs, illustrations, plates used in the production of livres d'artiste, such as Trans-apparence (1969), Charlevoix (1980), Icare (1981), and Mouvante spirale du regard (1981), and his books on painters such as Riopelle, Fortin, Borduas, Dallaire, Domingue, Brault and Ricard.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Guy Robert in a number of accessions. [1982-02, 1986-10, 1988-16]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

Roberts, Charles George Douglas

  • Roberts family

    Roberts family fonds. - 1890-1966. - 80 cm of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Considered the father of Canadian literature and one of Canada's best known poets, Charles G.D. Roberts (1860-1943) grew up near Sackville, New Brunswick and studied at the University of New Brunswick. He began publishing his writing at age 20 with a collection of poems Orion and Other Poems (1880) and in 1883 became editor of the Toronto periodical the Week. He taught English literature at King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia from 1885 to 1895. Following the publication of his first collection of highly popular animal stories, Earth's Enigmas (1896), Roberts supported himself through writing prose.

    Roberts lived in England from 1907 to 1925. During World War I, he was a private in the British forces and later worked in the Canadian War Records Office. He returned to Canada in 1925 and spent the rest of his life in Toronto. Roberts was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 1890, was awarded the Lorne Pierce Medal for distinguished service to Canadian literature in 1926, and was knighted in 1935.

    Scope and Content: The Roberts family fonds includes letters, poems, memorabilia, photographs and clippings by and about Roberts and members of his family: his sister Elizabeth Roberts MacDonald (1864-1922), his brother Theodore Goodridge Roberts (1877-1953), his son Lloyd Roberts (1884-1966), his son Douglas H.B. Roberts (1888-1974), his daughter Edith A.B. Roberts (1886-?), his niece Dorothy Roberts (1906-?), and his biographer, Elsie Pomeroy. Most of the material was found folded up in the books which formed the major part of the National Library's acquisition.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The fonds was received from the Estate of Annaliese Rudoff Roberts (widow of Douglas H.B. Roberts) in 1985.
    [1986-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: Elizabeth Roberts MacDonald fonds LMS-0137 [1987-05].

  • Roberts, Kevin

    Kevin Roberts fonds. - 196[9]-1989. - 7.5 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Kevin Roberts was born in Adelaide, Australia in 1940. He completed a B.A. in English, History and Education from Adelaide University in 1961. After moving to Canada in 1965, he taught school briefly in British Columbia and then studied at Simon Fraser University where he received his M.A. in 1968. Roberts began doctoral studies on "the indigenous figure in Canadian and Australian literature" at the University of London, then returned to Canada and began teaching creative writing at Malaspina College in Nanaimo, British Columbia. Poet, playwright and novelist, Roberts has published several books of poetry, including Cariboo Fishing Notes (1973), S'Ney'mos (1980), Stonefish (1982) and Nanoose Bay Suite (1984), several books of short stories, and a novel Tears in a Glass Eye (1989). His Red Centre Journal (1992) culminated in an exhibit of poetry, prose and photographs at the Madrona Centre of poetry in 1989. Among his dramatic works produced for television, radio, film and stage, Black Apples (a series of voice poems on the history of Nanaimo) was produced as a play in 1990. Roberts's literary activities include publishing True North/Down Under, a journal of Australian and Canadian literature, 1983-1986.

    Scope and Content: The Kevin Roberts fonds includes correspondence with colleagues and friends; manuscripts and typescripts of Roberts's published and unpublished poems, short stories, plays and their reviews: Flash Harry and the Daughter of Divine Light, The Pure Wound, Black Apples, Nanoose Bay Suite; also manuscripts, correspondence, and galley proofs for the journal True North/Down Under issues 1-3; and 39 panels of photographs, poetry and prose from the Red Centre Journal exhibit.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Kevin Roberts in two installments. [1985-10, 1989-19]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: restrictions on correspondence.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Rohana, Rosette, Collection of Réjean Ducharme letters (French only)

Rohmer, Richard

Rosenblatt, Joe

Ross, James Sinclair

Rothwell, Annie

Rowe, Kaye

  • Roy, Gabrielle

    Gabrielle Roy fonds. - 1940-1983. - 20 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Pre-eminent French-Canadian writer, Gabrielle Roy, was born to a francophone family in Saint-Boniface, Manitoba in 1909. She was educated at the Académie Saint-Joseph in Saint-Boniface and the Winnipeg Normal Institute. She taught for 12 years, first in isolated villages, then in Saint-Boniface, where she was also involved in theatre with the Cercle Molière. In 1937, she moved to Europe (France and England, 1937-1939) where she studied drama and wrote her first articles, which were published in the French periodical Je suis partout. On her return to Canada in 1939, she settled in Montreal and published feature stories, descriptive pieces and essays in various newspapers and journals: Le Jour, La Revue moderne, Le Bulletin des agriculteurs and others. Inspired by life in the working-class district of Saint-Henri, she wrote her first novel, Bonheur d'occasion (1945). The English translation, The Tin Flute, was published in 1947; this novel was eventually translated into 15 languages. Bonheur d'occasion won the Prix Fémina (1947) and was named best-seller by the Literary Guild of America in 1947. Also in 1947, Gabrielle Roy married Dr. Marcel Carbotte and moved to Quebec City.

    Bonheur d'occasion was followed by other novels and collections of short stories and essays. The many honours and artistic awards were showered on her including being the first Canadian woman to be accepted by the Royal Society of Canada (1947). She was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1967, she received the Prix Duvernay for the body of her work in 1956, le Prix David in 1971 and the Molson Prize in 1978. Her other important works include Ces enfants de ma vie (1977), which earned her a third Governor General's Literary Award. Her autobiography, La Détresse et l'Enchantement, which relates the first 30 years of her life (until 1939), and her letters to her sister, Ma chère petite sœur, Lettres à Bernadette 1943-1970, were published posthumously in 1984 and 1988 respectively.

    Scope and Content: The Gabrielle Roy fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts and proofs of published and unpublished works: La Rivière sans repos, Cet été qui chantait, Un Jardin au bout du monde, Ces enfants de ma vie and La Détresse et l'Enchantement. The fonds does not include any documentation for Bonheur d'occasion and only a few pages for La Petite Poule d'eau. The fonds also includes a considerable amount of personal and business correspondence, financial records and memorabilia, copies of books by Gabrielle Roy and the anthologies and periodicals in which her works appeared.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: The Gabrielle Roy fonds was acquired in two accessions from Fonds Gabrielle-Roy Inc. [1982-11, 1986-11]

    In 1989, the National Library of Canada received approximately 100 letters written by Gabrielle Roy to Berthe Simard, her friend and neighbour in Petite-Rivière-Saint-François. [1989-08]

    In 1994, François Côté donated two unpublished works by Gabrielle Roy to the National Library of Canada. [1994-17] They were part of the Émile-Charles-Hamel fonds. Hamel was a journalist and critic who had received them for publication or comment in the newspaper Le Jour (1939-40). The Émile-Charles-Hamel fonds is found at the Université de Sherbrooke.

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: Researchers who wish to consult the unpublished texts and personal correspondence must obtain written authorization from the Directeur administratif du Fonds Gabrielle-Roy Inc. c/o Professeur François Ricard, 451 Stuart Ave., Montréal, Quebec H2V 3H1.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: the Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte fonds LMS-0173 [1990-17, 1993-11]; the Marie-Anna Roy fonds LMS-0105 [1984-05]; the Jeanne Lapointe fonds LMS-0172 [1990-16]; the Société des Éditions Pascal fonds LMS-0216 [1995-11].

  • Roy, Gabrielle and Marcel Carbotte

    Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte fonds. - undated, [1860?], [1910]-1989. - 2.6 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Manitoba-born writer Gabrielle Roy (1909-1983) made her mark in French and English Canada and abroad through her works, which were translated into a number of languages. In 1947, she married Dr. Marcel Carbotte (1914-1989), who graduated from the medical faculty of the Université Laval in 1941 and later specialized in obstetrics and gynecology (1955). After Dr. Carbotte's death in 1990, the Fonds Gabrielle-Roy Inc. gave the Literary Manuscript Collection of the National Library of Canada all records belonging to Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte which Dr. Carbotte had kept after his wife's death.

    Scope and Content: The Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte fonds contains biographical information on Gabrielle Roy, her personal and business correspondence and a collection of over 2 000 postcards; also included are manuscripts and proofs of her published works, records pertaining to the death of Gabrielle Roy, her family files, memorabilia, photographic records (nearly 2 000 photographic proofs, negatives and slides) and audio-visual records.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Fonds Gabrielle-Roy Inc. [1990-17, 1993-11]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: Researchers wishing to consult the Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte fonds must request a letter of reference from Fonds Gabrielle-Roy Inc. c/o Professeur François Ricard, 451 Stuart Ave., Montréal, Quebec H2V 3H1.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Related Records Different Fonds: the Gabrielle Roy fonds LMS-0082 [1982-11].

  • Roy, Marie-Anna-A.

    Marie-Anna-Adèle Roy fonds. - [1958?] 414 p.; 19 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Teacher and writer Marie-Anna-A. Roy, sister of Gabrielle Roy, was born in Saint-Léon, Manitoba in 1896. She taught in rural schools in Manitoba and Alberta for 35 years. An accident forced her to take early retirement. Subsequently, she devoted herself to writing, first in Tangent, Alberta, then in Montreal, Quebec.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains a copy of her novel Valcourt ou La Dernière Étape: roman du Grand-Nord canadien, with the author's corrections. The handwritten dedication reads as follows: "En hommage d'un humble auteur du Canada français... Paris 6, le 2 février 1961. Les événements relatés dans ce roman se sont déroulés en Alberta de 1929 à 1939." [In tribute from a humble French-Canadian author… Paris 6, February 2, 1961. The events related in this novel took place in Alberta from 1929 to 1939.]

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: unknown.

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Associated Material: the Marie-Anna-Adèle-Roy fonds in the Archives nationales du Québec, in Montreal.

    Related Records Different Fonds: the Gabrielle Roy and Marcel Carbotte fonds LMS-0173 [1990-17].

 

S

  • Sabourin, Marcel

    Marcel Sabourin fonds. - 1953-1966. - 6 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Actor, director and theatre professor Marcel Sabourin has played an active role in Quebec theatre and film for 45 years. Born in Montreal, Quebec in 1935, he studied at the Collège Sainte-Marie, at the Théâtre du nouveau monde and in Paris. He was the co-founder in 1954 of the Compagnie de Montréal, performed at the Théâtre de l'Égrégore and directed at the Théâtre Club. He teaches improvisation at the National Theatre School. Recently, he has worked extensively in films, among others: J.-A. Martin photographe (1976), The Hitman (1991) and Lilies (1996).

    Scope and Content: The Marcel Sabourin fonds contains programs, advertisements, costume sketches, the script of Le Licou (1958?) by Jacques Ferron, and production notes for Le Licou and L'Ogre (1949?) by Jacques Ferron.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Montreal Book Auctions in 1978. [1978-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restriction: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Sadlier/Chadwick family

  • Safarik, Allan

    Allan Safarik fonds. - 1970-1989. - 6 m of textual record and graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet and editor, Allan Safarik was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1948. He received his B.A. in English from Simon Fraser University. His poetry has been published in numerous literary journals and in several anthologies. In addition, he has published several volumes of poetry: Okira (1975), The Heart is Altered (1979), The Naked Machine Rides On (1980), Advertisement for Paradise (1986), and has edited Vancouver Poetry. Since 1990 Safarik has worked as editor of literary projects with Polestar Press which publishes general trade books with special interest in poetry, fiction, sports, juvenile and young-adult fiction.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains Allan Safarik's personal papers dating from approximately 1970 to 1989 and includes literary correspondence, his correspondence as a publisher and as a member of the League of Canadian Poets, manuscripts, research materials, publicity, clippings for his books of poetry and for books he has edited, and photographs.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Allan Safarik in 1990.
    [1990-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: box list available.

Saint-Denys Garneau, Hector de /See/ GARNEAU, Hector de Saint-Denys

  • Salverson, Laura Goodman

    Laura Goodman Salverson fonds. - 1922-1970. - 2 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Laura Goodman Salverson was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1890, the daughter of Icelanders who immigrated to Canada in 1887. She is considered a descendant of the last of the Viking nobles. Salverson spent her early years in Winnipeg, in North Dakota, and in different parts of Canada and the United States as her parents wandered. Following her marriage to George Salverson in 1913, a railway worker of Norwegian ancestry, she lived in almost every region of Canada. Her writing career began in Regina with the encouragement of Austin Bothwell. Her first three novels focus on the immigrant experience in the West, the sense of betrayal, and the question of cultural identity. The Viking Heart (1923) is a historical novel that covers the immigration of 1 400 Icelanders in 1876 to the area of Gimli, Manitoba, their settlement and integration, and their disillusionment resulting from Canada's participation in World War I. Pacifist and integration themes remain central in her next work, The Dark Weaver: Against the Sombre Background of the Old Generations Flame the Scarlet Banners of the New (1937), which won the Governor General's Literary Award in 1937. She received another Governor General's Literary Award in 1939 for her autobiographical Confessions of an Immigrant's Daughter (1939). Her Immortal Rock: The Saga of the Kensington Stone tells the story of the Paul Knutson expedition to Greenland and to Minnesota in the 14th century which received the Ryerson Fiction Award in 1954. She published a volume of poems Wayside Gleams, in 1925. In addition to her writing, Salverson taught creative writing, gave dramatic recitals of the Norse sagas and edited the Icelandic Canadian.

    Scope and Content: The Laura Goodman Salverson fonds includes the typescripts of Lord of the Silver Dragon, The Dove of El Djzair, The Dark Weaver, Black Lace, Confessions of an Immigrant's Daughter; the typescripts of published and unpublished poems and short stories; correspondence; scrapbook; photographs; and clippings.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from George Salverson.
    [1971-03]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Sangster, Charles

  • Savard, Félix-Antoine

    Félix-Antoine Savard fonds. - n.d., 1937, 1964. - 18 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Priest and writer Félix-Antoine Savard was born in Quebec City in 1896. He grew up in Chicoutimi and spent his summers in the woods and travelling on the Saguenay River. Savard completed a B.A. and began theology studies at the Grand Séminaire de Chicoutimi in 1918. He was ordained a priest in 1922 and served in a number of parishes in Charlevoix County. In 1934, he gathered together a group of unemployed people and their families to found two agricultural hamlets in the Abitibi region. His knowledge of both forestry and the inhabitants of the region provided him with the raw material for his writings. His work, more "poetic prose" than short fiction, is remarkable for its image-rich style and combination of French from France and French-Canadian expressions. His best-known work Menaud, maître-draveur (1937) relates the story of a veteran lumberjack filled with bitterness about the exploitation of Quebec's natural resources and workforce by foreign companies. Menaud received the Prix David and the Prix de la langue française from the Académie française. Savard re-wrote Menaud in 1944 and again in 1960.

    Savard joined the Faculté des arts at Université Laval in 1945 and became its Dean in 1950. He was appointed to the Royal Society of Canada in 1945, resigned in 1954, and became a member of the Académie canadienne-française in 1955. In 1968, he received the Prix Athanase-David for the body of his work.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains a manuscript of the first edition (1937) of Menaud, maître draveur, partially written by the author, and the galleys of the last edition (1964) with holographic corrections and additions. In 1996, the National Library of Canada acquired the manuscript Louise de Sinigolle, a poem which celebrates the legends, customs and traditions of the Charlevoix and the Saguenay.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Roger LeMoine in 1982 and 1996. [1982-09, 1996-11]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary inventory available.

    Associated Material: the Félix-Antoine-Savard fonds in the Archives Division of Université Laval. (P123)

  • Scott, Chris

    Chris Scott fonds. - 1969-1984. - 1.15 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist Chris Scott was born in Hull, England in 1945. He studied at the University of Hull (B.A., 1966), Manchester University (M.A., 1967), and in 1968-1969 he was a Fulbright Scholar at Pennsylvania State. After teaching for several years at York University in Toronto, he settled in a small town north of Kingston. His literary activities include teaching creative writing, freelance broadcasting for the CBC and writing reviews for Books in Canada (1972-1982). Scott is best known as a writer of experimental fiction. He has written thriller, spy and crime novels. His first published novel, Bartleby (1971) launched his literary career, followed by To Catch a Spy (1978), Antichthon (1982), Hitler's Bomb (1984), and Jack (1997). Scott won the Crime Writers of Canada Arthur Ellis Award for Jack, about Jack the Ripper. His latest work, Quabe's World satirizes the scientific way of looking at man in the 20th century. Scott was writer-in-residence in Cumberland Township libraries in 1990 and makes his home in the Ottawa Valley.

    Scope and Content: The Chris Scott fonds includes typescripts of poetry and novels, published, unpublished and in progress, including Bartleby, To Catch a Spy, Antichthon, Hitler's Bomb, Jack and Quabe's World; correspondence with Dennis Lee concerning Bartleby, Gary Geddes, George Woodcock, and others. Several volumes of unpublished poetry, Women, Men and Gods and Four Poems for a Summer Season and unpublished novels, To Every Several Man and Getting There.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Chris Scott in 1984. [1984-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Scott, Duncan Campbell

Scott, Gail

Scott, Francis Reginald

Service, Peter

Service, Stanley Frederick

  • Shields, Carol

    Carol Shields fonds. - 1954-1998. - 23 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist, poet and playwright, Carol Shields (née Warner) was born in Oak Park, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois in 1935. Encouraged by her parents and her teachers, Shields began writing at an early age, producing articles and sonnets for her high-school paper and literary journal. She studied at Hanover College, Indiana (B.A.), the University of Exeter in England, and the University of Ottawa, where she received her M.A. in 1975. She married Donald Hugh Shields in 1957. They moved to Canada and the couple raised five children. Shields taught at the University of Ottawa, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Manitoba, where she was on faculty until 1999. Shields' poetic works include Others (1972), Intersect (1974), and Coming to Canada (1992), though she is best known as a novelist. Her first novel, Small Ceremonies, won the Canadian Author's Association Award for best novel of 1977. Other works include The Box Garden (1977), Happenstance (1980), A Fairly Conventional Woman (1982 ) and Swann: A Mystery (1987). Early in her career, Shields received the Marion Engel Award for a Canadian woman writer in 1970. Her more recent works include The Republic of Love (1992) and The Stone Diaries (1993) which won both a Governor General's Literary Award and the Pulitzer Prize; and Larry's Party, which was short-listed for the Giller Prize in 1997 and which won the Orange Prize in 1998. Shields has also written several successful dramatic works, including Thirteen Hands (1993) which premièred at Winnipeg's Prairie Theatre Exchange in 1993, and was co-produced by the National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the Canadian Stage Company in Toronto in 1997. Carol Shields was awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Ottawa (1995), the University of British Columbia (1996), her American alma mater Hanover College (1996), Queen's University (1996), University of Winnipeg (1996), Concordia University (1998) and the University of Toronto (1998). Shields became the fifth Chancellor of the University of Winnipeg in 1996. She was a member of the Canada Council (1993-1997) and was nominated to the Order of Canada in July 1998.

    Scope and Content: The Carol Shields fonds includes professional and personal correspondence; the early drafts of all of Shields's books (except Susanna Moodie: Voice and Vision); manuscripts of unpublished works; manuscripts of book reviews, essays and short stories; Canada Council materials; clippings, interviews, research materials for the Crestview Damaged Homeowners Association; university teaching records; Humber School for Writers teaching records; memorabilia, including old photos, diaries and daybooks, juvenilia and awards; and interviews with Shields on video and audiotape. These materials reflect the full range of Shields's activities as writer, critic, public figure, teacher, family member, as well as, reflecting her professional recognition and international popularity as an author.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Carol Shields in 1994 and 1997. [1994-13, 1997-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available for both accessions.

  • Shtern, Sholem

    Sholem Shtern fonds. - predominant 1960-1990. - 4.84 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Sholem Shtern was a poet, essayist, and teacher best known for his novels in verse depicting the life of Jewish immigrants in Canada. He was born in 1906/1907 in Tishevitz, a small town near Lublin, Poland. His father, Ha-rav Avraham Dovid Shtern, was a shochet (rituals slaughterer), a lamdan (traditional primary school teacher), and a highly respected scholar who published several works of Jewish scholarship. Shtern received a traditional Jewish education, and then earned his living giving private Hebrew lessons.

    Shtern emigrated to Canada in 1927. Diagnosed with tuberculosis, he spent almost two years at the Mount Sinai Hospital in the Laurentians. There he met Sonia Elbaum, who was employed as a nurse. Sonia had grown up in Bialistok and had been brought to Canada by her aunt. She and Shtern were married in 1928. Sonia and Sholem Shtern had two sons, Leo (Leybl) and David Stern. The family resided on Colonial Street between Mount Royal and Duluth Streets in the Plateau area of Montréal. They moved to their home on Wiseman Street in Park Extension in 1957.

    Shtern was a member of a prominent Yiddish literary family in Montréal. His three brothers, Jacob Zipper, Yehiel and Israel Shtern, his sister, Shifre Krishtalka, and his nephew, Aaron Krishtalka, were Yiddish writers and poets. The siblings had arrived one by one to Canada from their native Poland, and eventually brought over their parents as well.

    Shtern began to write Yiddish poems and essays, which were published in various Yiddish literary magazines. The couple settled in Montréal, where Shtern initially worked selling Yiddish magazines door-to-door. He worked in a fruit store and then as a clerk in a bookstore. Concerned about earning a living, Shtern found a position teaching at the UJPO (United Jewish People's Order or Faryenikter yidisher folks ordn) in the Morris Winchevsky School. He eventually became its principal, a position he occupied for some twenty years.

    Shtern had early on become interested in Marxism as a road to security for the Jewish people and the universal improvement of human life. While not a party member, he was involved with many leftist organizations. He wrote for the Communist and Socialist press, and was active in the UJPO. As a young man he toured Canada to promote the Socialist message. He maintained extensive contacts with Yiddish writers in Poland, and in 1949 travelled to Poland. He was invited to Poland again by a group of Yiddish writers but was bitterly disappointed in the lack of a government involvement in preserving Jewish life in Poland. Although he became increasingly disillusioned by Communism, he remained committed to issues of social justice to the end.

    Shtern's first poems appeared in Oyfkum, a monthly Yiddish literary magazine in New York. He went on to have his works published in a wide variety of Yiddish publications around the world, including the Tsukunft, the Morgn Freiheit, and Literarishe Bleter. His work also appeared in English translation in Jewish Currents and other magazines, as well as in French, Russian, and Polish translations. His poetry has been included in Yiddish, English, French, Russian and Polish language anthologies, as well as being set to music, performed, and recorded. At the same time, Shtern was a prolific journalist in the Yiddish press, contributing regularly to the Toronto Vochenblatt and other publications.

    Shtern's greatest passion was writing. By 1945, he had published three well-received books of poetry: Noentkayt: lider (Toronto: Oyfgang, 1929), Es Likhtikt (Montréal: Kulture komitet baym yidishn hilfs fareyn, 1941), and Inderfri (Montréal: Kanader Vokhnblat, 1945). During the period 1945 to 1960, Shtern's primary occupation was with the Winchevsky school, although he did publish in the press. The end of his tenure with the school in 1959 allowed him to devote more time to his writing, and the next fifteen years were his most productive. He published three Yiddish novels in verse: In Kanade (2 vols) (Montréal: Sholem Shtern Bukh-komitet, 1960-1963), Dos Vayse Hoyz (New York: YKUF, c.1967), and Di Mishpokhe in Kanade un Dos Hoyzgesind fun profesor Sidni Goldstin: Tsvey noveln (Montréal: [S. Shtern], 1975). Still, while his main occupation was as a journalist and poet, Shtern remained an educator, giving private lessons in Yiddish and Hebrew, and taught a Yiddish Creative class at Montréal's Golden Age Association from the 1970s until shortly before his death in 1990.

    Shtern placed great importance of the translation of his works into other languages, and all of his novels in verse were translated and published. In Kanade appeared in English and French under the titles In Canada: A Novel in Verse (Trans. Judith Rotstein. Montréal, 1984) and Au Canada: un roman en vers (Trans. Tatania Hais. Montréal: S. Shtern, 1984). His most well-known work, Dos Vayse Hoyz, appeared in Hebrew, English, and French under the titles Ha-Bayit ha-lavan be-harim (Trans. Shimshon Meltzer. Tel Aviv: ha-Menorah, 1972), The White House (Trans. Max Rosenfeld. New York: Warbrooke Publishers, 1974), and Velvl: un roman en vers (Trans. from English by Guy Maheux. Montréal: Société de belles-lettres Guy Maheux, c. 1977). Di Mishpokhe in Kanade un Dos Hoyzgesind fun profesor Sidni Goldstin: Tsvey noveln appeared in English and French under the titles The Family in Canada: A Novel in Verse (Trans. Yiddish to French Tatiana Hais. Revised Guy Maheux. Montréal: S. Shtern, 1984), La Famille Au Canada: un roman en vers (Trans. Tatania Hais. Montréal: S. Shtern, 1984), and The Household of Professor Sydney Goldstein: A Novel in Verse = La Maisonnée du Professor Sydney Goldstein: un roman en vers. Trans. French to English: Guy Maheux, Revised: Guy Maheux. Montréal: S. Shtern, 1984). Shtern's final published work was a book of Yiddish essays and memoirs titled Shrayber vos ikh hob gekent: memuarn un esayen (Montréal: Sholem Shtern bukh fon komitet, 1982).

    Shtern took an active role in all the phases of the publication and distribution of his works. In addition to fundraising and finding publishers, he personally sold his works at every opportunity. At the same time, he was involved in selling a record on the Folkways label titled Jewish Classical Literature because it contained a dramatic reading of one of his poems, "Alef Beys," by Chaim Ostrovsky.

    Shtern was the recipient of the Annual YKUF Prize for Literature, the Dr. Chaim Zhitlovsky Prize for Literature, in addition to numerous project grants for the publication of his works in Yiddish and in English and French translations.

    Shtern died after an extended illness in Montréal in August of 1990.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains a variety of materials which relate to Shtern's activities as a poet, journalist, teacher, and community figure. Included in the fonds are handwritten correspondence from a wide variety of individuals and organizations, manuscripts of published works, and publicity materials for public readings held by Shtern. Together they present insight into the various facets of Shtern's life. The Shtern fonds can also be of interest to those interested in any of the following individuals active in the Yiddish literary world (a list by no means exhaustive): Herz Bergner, Israel Bercovitch, Abraham Bick, Yosef Burg, Philip Cherner, Sheen Daixel, B. Z. Goldberg, Ber Green, V. J. Jerome, Berl Kagan, Menke Katz, Aaron Kramer, Rokhl Pressman, Chana Safran, Y. E. Ronch, Zishe Weinper, David Weiss, and Yankl Zipper.

    This fonds contains the following series: Correspondence, Preparatory Materials and Manuscripts, Professional Materials, Personal Memorabilia, and Published Works.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from his son, David Shtern, and his daughter-in-law, Elspeth.

    Language: material in fonds is predominantly in Yiddish.

    Restrictions on Access and Use: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Smart, Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Smart fonds. - 1925-1986. - 17 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1913, Smart began writing as a young child, publishing her first poem at the age of ten. She attended Hatfield Hall, a private school, spent summers at Kingsmere and went to England at 18 to study piano. In 1937, Smart traveled around the world as the private secretary to Mrs. Alfred Watt, head of the Associated Country Women of the World. On her return to Ottawa, Smart wrote for the woman's page of the Ottawa Journal for approximately six months before leaving Ottawa altogether. She went first to New York, then to California and Mexico. The story of her meeting with British poet George Barker, with whom she had a passionate love affair and bore four children, is told in By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept (1945). By Grand Central Station was reprinted in 1966, 1975, 1977, 1978 and 1982 and was performed as a stage play, revised for broadcast on radio and translated into French. Smart followed Barker to England in 1943 and remained there for most of her life. She supported herself and her children by working as an advertising copywriter for 13 years, then joined the staff of Queen in 1963. By 1966, she gave up commercial writing and settled into life at The Dell, a cottage in the north of Suffolk where she gardened and resumed a literary life. Her second book, A Bonus (1977), was followed by Ten Poems (1981), Eleven Poems (1982), then The Assumption of the Rogues and Rascals (1982).

    Elizabeth Smart returned briefly to Canada where she held the position of writer-in-residence at the University of Alberta during the 1982-83 academic year. With the encouragement of poet, Alice VanWart, she published an interim collection of her journal writings, In the Meantime, which contains her story entitled, "Dig a Grave and Let Us Bury Our Mother". The first volume of her journals, covering the period from 1940 to 1982, was published in 1985, the year before she died, as Necessary Secrets (edited by VanWart). Several collections of her writings were published following her death: Autobiographies (1987) includes miscellaneous documents, letters, and journals dating from 1940 to 1982; Juvenilia (1987) is a collection of early stories written between the ages of 11 and 19 and includes family letters; and Elizabeth's Garden: Elizabeth Smart on the Art of Gardening (1980) is a collection of her published columns with excerpts from her own garden journals. The play Memories of You (1989) by Wendy Lill is based on Smart's life. Her biography, entitled By Heart: Elizabeth Smart/a Life, was written by Rosemary Sullivan in 1991.

    Scope and Content: The Elizabeth Smart fonds includes journals and notebooks; family correspondence and documents; personal and professional correspondence; typescripts and galleys of her published works; articles and copy writing; gardening journals and correspondence; clippings and reviews; material relating to George Barker and to other writers including W.S. Graham and Marie Stopes; and memorabilia.

    The National Library of Canada acquired a holograph copy of By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept in 1982 with the following inscriptions by Elizabeth Smart: "Special De Luxe Advance Edition limited to one copy and made expressly for [illegible] by E.S. Oct. 1941. Also copyright in all countries." "To Maxi with love Elizabeth." "Printed at Pender Harbour, B.C." It was accompanied by a copy of the published book inscribed, "To Maxi and John with love from Elizabeth, Georgina, Christopher, Sebastian." and a photograph of Smart with Georgina and Christopher.

    A further accession acquired in 1990 provides a glimpse into Elizabeth Smart's early adult life. It includes journals, diaries, notebooks, correspondence (including with her parents), writings, memorabilia and miscellaneous materials dating from 1928 to 1985.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: Acquired from Maximiliane von Upani Southwell [1982-08], Elizabeth Smart [1983-05], the Estate of Elizabeth Smart [1987-09], and Alice Van Wart [1990-03].

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available.

  • Smith, Ray

    Ray Smith fonds. - 1964-1989. - 3.5 m of textual record and other materials.

    Biographical Sketch: Ray Smith was born in Inverness, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia in 1941. He received a B.A. in English from Dalhousie University (1963) and an M.A. from Concordia University (1985). Smith has lived in Montreal since 1968. He has been involved with Montreal StoryTeller and has been writer-in-residence at the University of Alberta (1986-87). Since 1970, Smith has taught at Dawson College in Montreal. Smith is renowned as a post-modernist writer of what he calls speculative fiction. His published works include: Cape Breton Is the Thought Control Centre of Canada (1969), Lord Nelson Tavern (1974), Century (1986) and A Night at the Opera, which won the QSPELL Hugh MacLennan Award for Best Novel of 1992. His most recent work is entitled The Man Who Loved Jane Austen (1999).

    Scope and Content: The Ray Smith fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts for his published and unpublished works, some correspondence, tape recordings of the Montreal StoryTellers in performance and computer files of his latest fiction. A second accession [1995-10] was acquired from the author in 1995.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Ray Smith in two installments in 1989 and 1995. [1989-14, 1995-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for both accessions.

  • Société des Éditions Pascal

    Société des Éditions Pascal fonds. - 1944-48. - 30 cm of textual record.

    Administrative History: Les Éditions Pascal, founded by Gérard Dagenais, published Gabrielle Roy's first novel, Bonheur d'occasion, in 1945. The company flourished as a result of restrictions on publishing in France during the war years. Les Éditions Pascal published 23 titles, between 1944 and 1947, before closing its doors, despite the great success of Bonheur d'occasion.

    Biographical Sketch: Gérard Dagenais (1913-1981) was a journalist for the dailies Le Soleil, L'Ordre, Le Canada and Le Droit before becoming a translator in Ottawa. On his return to Montreal, he became literary director of the Revue moderne before setting up a translation office and then a publishing company.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contains correspondence pertaining to the publication, translation and reception of Bonheur d'occasion, the typescript of the second volume of the work and a copy of the original edition in two volumes with corrections.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Bernard Dagenais, Gérard Dagenais' son, in 1995. [1995-11]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restriction: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Associated Material: the Société-des-Éditions-Pascal fonds in the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec. (MSS-381)

  • Soulières, Robert

    Robert Soulières fonds. - 1979-1989. - 36 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Robert Soulières was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1950. He studied at Notre-Dame and Saint-Ignace colleges, then obtained a B.A. in education from the Université du Québec à Montréal (1972). He worked in the educational field for twelve years. He contributed to a range of periodicals and managed the journal, Lurelu, for seven years. He also headed Éditions Pierre Tisseyre (1987-1996), where he created a number of collections of novels and albums for young people. Later, he founded Soulières Éditeur. His stories and novels for young people have received numerous awards: Le Visiteur du soir (1980) won ASTED's Alvine-Belisle Prize; Casse-tête chinois (1985) earned a Governor General's Literary Award; and, Un Cadavre de classe (1997) won the Mr. Christie's Book Award for best French book for ages 12 to 16. He has also been a literary columnist for radio and for Lurelu.

    Scope and Content: The fonds consists of manuscripts of his works Le Visiteur du soir (1980), Casse-tête chinois (1985), Le Baiser maléfique (1985), La Nuit blanche de Mathieu (1988) and Ciel d'Afrique et pattes de gazelle (1990).

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1991. [1991-09]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Spencer, Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Spencer fonds. - 1957-1982. - 20 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Elizabeth Spencer was born in Carrollton, Mississippi in 1921 to a storytelling and book-loving family in a community steeped in the oral traditions of the South. Spencer attended Belhaven College in Jackson, Mississippi (1938) and then Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee (1942) where she studied English literature. Her first novel, Fire in the Morning, published in 1948, was well-received. With the support of the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1953 she moved to Italy to concentrate on her writing. There she met and later married John Rusher. After five years in Italy and the publication of Spencer's third novel, the couple moved to Montreal where they lived from 1958 to 1986. She taught creative writing for several years at Concordia University. In 1986, Spencer moved to North Carolina and took a position as Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina for five years. She received numerous literary prizes and honours, including the McGraw-Hill Fiction Prize for her most popular work of fiction, The Light in the Piazza (1960) which was later made into a film. Spencer received honorary doctorate degrees from Rhodes College (1968), Concordia University (1988), and the University of the South (1992). In 1985, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters and in 1992 was awarded the John Dos Passos Award for Literature.

    Scope and Content: The Elizabeth Spencer fonds includes correspondence; manuscripts and typescripts of novels and short stories, including: The Light in the Piazza, Knights and Dragons, No Place for an Angel, Ship Island and Other Stories, The Snare, The Stories of Elizabeth Spencer and The Salt Line; and memorabilia. The 1997 accession includes manuscripts, drafts, page proofs, and correspondence relating to Landscapes of the Heart: A Memoir; and documentation of literary activities, audio tapes, and videos.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: fonds acquired from Elizabeth Spencer in various accessions. [1984-03, 1987-17, 1989-21, 1991-11, 1992-16, 1993-10, 1994-04, 1997-03]

    In 1993, the National Library of Canada received 65 letters (1959-1993) written by Elizabeth Spencer to Morton King, a former colleague at the University of Mississippi. [1993-10]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: restrictions on access to personal correspondence.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for some accessions.

Springer, Morris

Stead, Robert J.C.

  • Sward, Robert

    Robert Sward fonds. - 1966-1985. - 12 m of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet, editor, writer and teacher, Robert Sward was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. He attended the University of Illinois (B.A., 1956) and the University of Iowa (M.A., 1958), and subsequently did postgraduate work at Middlebury College in Vermont and the University of Bristol in England. Sward was poet-in-residence and taught English at various universities in the United States. Following his move to Victoria, British Columbia in 1969, he became poet-in-residence at the University of Victoria and taught creative writing there until 1973. Sward founded The Soft Press in 1970 and published 21 titles, mainly West Coast poetry, until he sold the press in 1977. He was editor-in-chief of Hancock House Publishers from 1976 to 1979. Sward moved to Toronto, in 1979, where he worked on a freelance basis, writing articles and reviews, teaching, editing and broadcasting. In 1985, Sward left Toronto for Santa Cruz, California where he now teaches at Monterey Peninsula College and continues to write and publish poetry, articles and reviews.

    Scope and Content: The Robert Sward fonds covers consists of personal and professional correspondence; journals, notebooks, manuscripts and typescripts of poems, fiction, reviews, including The Jurassic Shales, Twelve Poems, Half a Life's History: Poems New and Selected, The Toronto Islands and Four Incarnations: New and Selected Poems, 1957-1991; and the Soft Press archive from 1970 to 1978.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Robert Sward in several accessions. [1978-01, 1983-19, 1988-04, 1991-12, 1994-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on correspondence.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first two accessions.

  • Sylvestre, Guy

    Guy Sylvestre fonds. - 1930-1990. - 40.5 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Essayist, literary critic and literary historian Guy-Joseph Sylvestre was born in Sorel, Quebec in 1918. He received a classical education at Collège Sainte-Marie in Montreal and at the University of Ottawa, where he obtained a B.A. in philosophy in 1941 and a master's degree in arts in 1942. He was a translator in the Senate (1942-1944) and wrote book reviews for Le Droit (1940-1948). He contributed to numerous newspapers and journals, founded the journal Gants du ciel in 1943 and published an annual article on the topic poetry in Quebec in the University of Toronto Quarterly (1958-1968). Sylvestre was named to the Royal Society of Canada in 1952 and to the Académie canadienne-française in 1954. He was Associate National Librarian (1956-1968) and then National Librarian (1968-1983) at the National Library of Canada.

    Scope and Content: The Guy Sylvestre fonds contains correspondence; manuscripts and typescripts of his books and articles; clippings; literary files and records pertaining to the publication of Gants du ciel, L'Anthologie de la poésie canadienne d'expression française, and Poètes catholiques dans la France contemporaine; the fonds also contains correspondence with individuals and associations and files on the organization of the World Meeting on Poetry in 1967 and on the Royal Society of Canada.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Guy Sylvestre in two accessions. [1984-11, 1991-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: some restrictions.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Symons, Scott

 

T

  • Tata, Sam

    Portraits of Canadian Writers Collection. - 1991. - 40 photographs.

    Biographical Sketch: Montreal photographer, Sam Tata was born in Shanghai, China in 1911, and has portrayed some of the most interesting writers during one of the most exciting periods of Canadian literature. He is known for capturing the style of both writer and period through his perceptive portrayals of fellow artists.

    Scope and Content: These 40 photographs of Canadian authors formed an exhibition shown at the National Library of Canada as part of the launch of the book of the same title.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Sam Tata in 1992. [1992-01]

    Restrictions: no restrictions on consultation. Reproduction is not permitted without the consent of the photographer.

    Finding Aid: list of writers photographed available.

  • Thibodeau, Serge Patrice

    Serge Patrice Thibodeau Fonds. - 1976-2002. - 2.57 m of textual record and other materials.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet and essayist Serge Patrice Thibodeau was born on 11 August 1959 in Rivière Verte, New Brunswick. After his studies at the Centre universitaire Saint-Louis (Université de Moncton, Edmundston campus) and at Université Laval, he completed an MA in Creative Literary Studies in 1996 at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Serge Patrice Thibodeau, an inveterate traveller, has lived in Montréal since 1986. Literary critics see him as the revelation of the 1990s in Quebec poetry. Some include him among key poets of our era and believe that his collections deserve to be placed alongside those of the masters of French literature.

    Serge Patrice Thibodeau's writings, which have been influenced by his travels in Asia, the Middle East and a number of cities in Europe, including Prague, Budapest and Warsaw, focus on themes of wandering and erotic desire. His work expresses a mystical and sensual quest, imbued with Islamic and Christian forms of spirituality.

    Serge Patrice Thibobeau, who is active in Amnesty International, has published a major essay on torture. He is in demand as a lecturer internationally, not only for his views on human rights, but also for what he has to say about Quebec and Acadian poetry. He has taken part in many literary events in Canada and abroad, and many of his poems have been translated into English, Arabic, Castilian (Spanish), Catalan, Romanian, Slovakian and Czech.

    His books have received many awards, including the Prix France-Acadie (1991); the Prix Émile-Nelligan (1992), the Prix Edgar-Lespérance (1994), the Grand Prix du Festival international de la poésie de Trois-Rivières, and the Governor General's Literary Award (1996), in addition to the Prix Éloizes (2001).

    Scope and Content: The Serge Patrice Thibodeau fonds consists of various writings between 1976 and 2002. It is arranged into nine series: 1. Poetry; 2. Essays; 3. Journal and review articles; 4. Juvenilia, unpublished works and university works; 5. Diaries, notebooks, notepads and appointment books; 6. Professional activities; 7. Correspondence; 8. Translations and writings about the work of Serge Patrice Thibodeau; 9. Amnesty International.

    The materials in this fonds, which are very dense in terms of information content, are an invaluable resource for research in literary studies, particularly on the development of the text and biographical interpretation. They reveal Serge Patrice Thibodeau's working methods, show the development of his writing and his progress as a writer over a 20-year span, from his punk/new wave period in the early 1980s until the spiritual quest that gave rise to his works of the 1990s.

    The fonds contains many drafts of his 10 major collections of poetry: La Septième chute (1990), Le Cycle de Prague (1992), Le Passage des glaces (1992), Nous, l'étranger (1995), Le Quatuor de l'errance followed by La Traversée du désert (1995), Nocturnes (1997), Dans la Cité followed by Pacífica (1997), Le Roseau (1997 and 2000), Seuils (2002), Du haut de mon arbre (2002).

    The fonds contains several items of unpublished juvenilia, some of which were written in English; oratorio libretti; one-of-a-kind books written and bound by the author; unpublished university work; and early versions of the script for the film Le Désir et l'Argile, produced in cooperation with Assyrian filmmaker Baz Shamoun in 1997. The fonds also includes several files pertaining to Serge Patrice Thibodeau's participation in literary and cultural events, not only in Canada and Quebec, but also in France, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The fonds includes press kits for his publications; correspondence with publishers, organizations and famous politicians and people from the world of culture, as well as his personal correspondence. Also included are some files that are indicative of Serge Patrice Thibodeau's commitment to Amnesty International. There are also several manuscript drafts of two essays published in book form by Serge Patrice Thibodeau, L'Appel des mots: Lecture de Saint-Denys Garneau and La Disgrâce de l'humanité: Essai sur la torture, and a few drafts of four short essays published in periodicals or exhibition catalogues: Enluminures, La fierté acadienne se donne désormais des airs d'internationalisme; De la liberté d'expression; and Poésie acadienne. There are also two holographic drafts of Écrire contre Écrire sur (de l'auto censure). The fonds contains approximately 40 diaries, notebooks and notepads containing preliminary notes and the initial versions of some of Serge Patrice Thibodeau's works, particularly his poems. These diaries and notebooks also contain some personal writings, some prayers in French and Arabic, some travel journals, lecture notes, statements of accounts, travel budgets and various appointment books that provide information on at least part of Serge Patrice Thibodeau's everyday, professional, cultural and social life.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Serge Patrice Thibodeau in September 2002.

    Language: most of the material is in French, but some series include materials in Arabic and English.

    Restrictions: there are some restrictions on consultation, reproduction and publication.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Thomas, Audrey

    Audrey Thomas fonds. - 1953-1993. - 19 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Short-story writer and novelist, Audrey Thomas (née Callahan) was born in Binghampton, New York in 1935. She received a B.A. from Smith College in 1957 and a M.A. in English from the University of British Columbia in 1963 where she worked towards a Ph.D. in Anglo-Saxon language and literature. Thomas married sculptor and art teacher, Ian Thomas whom she met during a year abroad at St. Andrew's University in Scotland. They immigrated to Canada in 1959, settled in British Columbia, and had three daughters. The Thomases lived for two years in Ghana where Ian Thomas taught from 1964 to 1966. Following her return to Vancouver, Audrey Thomas published her first collection of stories, Ten Green Bottles (1967), and then several novels: Mrs. Blood (1970), Songs My Mother Taught Me (1973), Latakia (1979), and Real Mothers (1981), a collection of stories. In her work, Thomas experiments with narrative method and use of language to depict women's sense of emotional alienation, struggling with the dark side of the self, or hovering on the verge of disintegration. Thomas received the Marian Engel Award in 1987 and the Canada-Australia Literary Prize in 1990. She has won the B.C. Book Prize for fiction three times: for her novel Intertidal Life (1985), the short story collection Wild Blue Yonder (1991), and most recently for the novel Coming down from Wa (1995). She was nominated for the Governor General's Literary Award and Commonwealth Literature Prize in 1996. Thomas has taught creative writing at the University of Victoria and at the University of British Columbia and has been writer-in-residence at Concordia University, at Simon Fraser University, among others. Thomas lives on Galiano Island, British Columbia.

    Scope and Content: The Audrey Thomas fonds includes correspondence; research notes, manuscripts and typescripts for Ten Green Bottles, Mrs. Blood, Songs My Mother Taught Me, Latakia, Intertidal Life, Goodbye Harold, Good Luck, Graven Images and Wild Blue Yonder, as well as, for published and unpublished short stories, radio plays, articles and reviews; documents concerning professional activities; early writings; education and teaching; and memorabilia.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Audrey Thomas in two instalments. [1989-03, 1994-14]

    In 1992, the University of British Columbia transferred to the National Library of Canada a part of the Audrey Thomas fonds which had been acquired in the 1970s. [1992-17]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on consultation.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Thompson, John

    John Thompson fonds. - 1959-1978. - 60 cm of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet and professor, John Thompson was born in England in 1938 and educated at various boarding schools and the Manchester Grammar School. He received his B.A. in honours psychology from the University of Sheffield in 1958. Following two years service in the British Army intelligence corps, he studied comparative literature at Michigan State University and received his Ph.D. His thesis entailed the translation of poems by the French poet René Char. In 1966 he moved to Canada and taught English literature at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick. His first collection of poetry, At the Edge of the Chopping There Are No Secrets, was published by Anansi in 1973. He wrote the 38 poems in his second - and last - collection, Stilt Jack, while in Toronto on a sabbatical rest in what turned out to be his final years. Thompson died in Sackville, New Brunswick at the age of 38. The definitive edition of Thompson's poems, published and unpublished, including his translations of French and Québecois poets, John Thompson: Collected Poems and Translations, and a detailed biographical essay by the editor, Peter Sanger, were published by Goose Lane Editions (Fredericton) in 1995.

    Scope and Content: Most of Thompson's manuscripts were lost in a fire that destroyed his home in 1974. The fonds includes notebooks, manuscripts and typescripts, working drafts and final drafts of poems, plus a cassette tape.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Shirley Gibson. [1996-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some restrictions on access.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Thompson, Neville

  • Tibo, Gilles

    Gilles Tibo fonds. - 1987. - 37 illustrations.

    Biographical Sketch: Born in Montreal, Quebec in 1951, Gilles Tibo is one of the best-known artists of his generation. Tibo has contributed to numerous periodicals such as BD, Croc, Prisme, L'Actualité and Dimanche matin. His drawings are found on posters, record covers and book covers, and in many books. He has published several cartoon strips, including L'Oeil voyeur (1970) and Lunambule (1979). From 1976 to 1979, he was artistic director of Le Tamanoir productions. In 1989, his work Simon et les flocons de neige (1988), won an international competititon for children's book illustrators in Japan. He also received a Governor General's Literary Award for illustration in the children's literature category for Simon et la ville de carton in 1992, and another Governor General's Literary Award in the same category for Noémie/Le Secret de Madame Lumbago in 1996.

    Scope and Content: The collection contains several versions of the manuscript of Simon et les flocons de neige, sketches and preliminary studies, final illustrations and four production records.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1989. (1989-13)

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Toye, William

Traill family

  • Tremblay, Michel

    Michel Tremblay fonds. - 1958-1986. - 9 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Playwright, storyteller, novelist and screenwriter Michel Tremblay was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1942. He studied graphic arts and worked as a typographer from 1963 to 1966. His first play, Le Train, which won first prize in a Radio-Canada contest for young authors in 1964, launched a long and prolific career, primarily as a dramatist. His play Les Belles-Soeurs (1968), staged at the Théâtre du Rideau Vert à Montréal in 1968, was a resounding success. Other important works, such as À toi pour toujours, ta Marie-Lou (197l), Bonjour là, bonjour (1976), and many more, propose the same distant vision of reality. Almost all his plays have been published in English, and a number of them have been acclaimed abroad. Tremblay's novels include La Grosse Femme d'à côté est enceinte (1978), Le Cœur à découvert (1986) and Un Ange cornu avec des ailes de tôle (1994). Tremblay has adapted and translated into French, plays by Aristophanes, Tennessee Williams, Dario Fa, Paul Zindel, Chekhov and Albee. He has written the screenplays of a number of films: Françoise Durocher, waitress, Il était une fois dans l'Est, Parlez-moi d'amour and Le Soleil se lève en retard. He has also written the lyrics for a number of songs for Pauline Julien, Renée Claude and Monique Leyrac. His honours and awards include the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste's Prix Victor-Morin, awarded for the body of his work in 1974, and the Prix Athanase-David awarded for the body of his work in 1988. The government of France saluted his work in 1984, naming him a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres de France. He was made a Chevalier de l'Ordre national du Québec in 1992. Tremblay has received several honorary doctorates from Canadian universities.

    Scope and Content: The Michel Tremblay fonds contains manuscripts and typescripts of plays and novels, notably En pièces détachées, La Duchesse de Langeais, Les Paons, À toi pour toujours, ta Marie-Lou, Hosanna, Bonjour là, bonjour, Albertine en cinq temps, La Cité dans l'œuf, and Thérèse et Pierrette à l'école des Saints-Anges; the fonds also includes unpublished texts, production records, adaptations by Tremblay, translations of works by Tremblay, audio tapes, photographs and memorabilia.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in three accessions. [1987-01, 1992-11, 1998-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in French.

    Restrictions: financial files are restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

    Other Formats: the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec microfimed the fonds in 1993.

  • Tundra Books

    Tundra Books fonds. - 1978-1983. - 40 cm of textual record and graphic material.

    Administrative History: Tundra Books was founded in 1967. The company publishes quality children's books, as well as, fiction and non-fiction books, many in bilingual English/French editions. Tundra Books was purchased by McClelland & Stewart in 1995.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes typescripts, proofs, a dummy of the book and 41 original illustrations by Richard Pelham for Look! The Land Is Growing Giants and the French edition, Regarde, il y a des géants partout! Several items include comments and annotations by the author, Joan Finnigan, and by the publisher, May Cutler of Tundra Books. The translation of the text by Jacques de Roussan is also included.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Tundra Books in 1984. [1984-13]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Turnbull, Gael

    Gael Turnbull fonds. - 1952-1985. - 13 cm of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: Doctor and poet, Gael Turnbull was born in Scotland in 1928 and was raised and educated in Winnipeg, Manitoba; Cambridge, England and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received a B.A. from the University of Cambridge in 1948, and his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1951. Turnbull practised medicine in Canada, the United States and England until 1989 before retiring to Scotland. While in Canada during the early 50s, Turnbull became part of a group of poets clustered around Contact Press. His first publication was in 1954 as one third of Trio (1954) with Phyllis Webb and Eli Mandel. The next year, while living in Iroquois Falls, Ontario, he published translations with Jean Beaupré of Quebec poets Hector de Saint Denys-Garneau, Roland Giguère, Gilles Hénault and Paul-Marie Lapointe. Turnbull returned to England where, in 1957, he founded Migrant Press, one of the pioneer small presses in Britain. Turnbull's contribution to Canadian poetry was celebrated in 1992 with the appearance of While Breath Persist (1992) a collection of his poems.

    Scope and Content: The Gael Turnbull fonds, acquired as a donation from the author in 1993, consists of correspondence from Canadian writers received by Turnbull. The letters date from the early 50s but represent only those letters Turnbull managed to save. Correspondence with Louis Dudek, John Sutherland, Raymond Souster and Doug Jones are the most significant, although letters concerning literary translation are also of considerable interest.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Gael Turnbull in 1993. [1993-05]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: list of correspondence available.

Turner, Dorothy, Collection of photos taken by de Saint-Denys Garneau

Tylor, Harold Edgar

 

U

  • Urquhart, Jane

    Jane Urquhart fonds. - 1976-1995. - 4 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Novelist and poet, Jane Urquhart, was born in Geraldton, Ontario in 1949. She received from the University of Guelph a B.A. in English in 1971 and a B.A. in Art History in 1976. Her earliest publications were of poetry, I'm Walking in the Garden of His Imaginary Palace (1982), her first published work, was a collaborative effort with her husband artist Tony Urquhart. Her first novel, The Whirlpool (1986), links the stories of three 19th century Canadians through use of the symbol of the whirlpool. The Whirlpool is the first Canadian book to win France's prestigious Prix de meilleur livre étranger (Best Foreign Book Award). Through its success, Urquhart gained significant national and international prominence as an author. Her novel Away (1993), encompasses aspects of both Irish and Canadian history as told through the lives of four generations of women. She has earned a reputation as a major Canadian novelist whose ability to incorporate Canadian history into present-day narratives is superlative. Her fourth novel, The Underpainter (1997) received the Governor General's Literary Award for fiction. Other honours include the Marian Engel Award (1994) for an outstanding body of prose written by a Canadian woman. In 1996 she was named a Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France. As a reviewer for the Globe and Mail and various literary journals, her opinion is widely sought. She has been a writer-in-residence at the University of Ottawa, Memorial University and the University of Toronto.

    Scope and Content: The Jane Urquhart fonds includes material that documents her literary career up to 1995 and includes diaries and notebooks; professional correspondence; published works; articles and reviews; critical reception, publicity, and promotional material. The second accession includes the various drafts of Away, as well as, documents relating to her growing list of professional activities.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Jane Urquhart in two installments. [1993-01, 1998-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: researchers must obtain the permission of Jane Urquhart in order to consult this fonds.

    Finding Aid: finding aids available.

V

  • Van Kampen, Vlasta

    Vlasta Van Kampen fonds. - [1990-1991] - 1 box of graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Illustrator, Vlasta Van Kampen was born in 1943 and grew up in Belleville, Ontario. She graduated from the Ontario College of Art in 1966 and worked as a book illustrator for McClelland & Stewart. Since 1970, she has worked as a freelance illustrator. She won the Canada Council Award for best illustrated children's book in 1983 for ABC/123: The Canadian Alphabet and Counting Book.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes research material for the project, 20 full-colour illustrations and a dummy for the children's book Rockanimals (1991), as well as, posters for some of her previous books.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Vlasta Van Kampen in 1996. [1996-10]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Van Sandwyk, Charles

    Charles Van Sandwyk fonds. - 1991-1992. - 1 box of graphic material.

    Biographical Sketch: Artist, Charles Van Sandwyk was born in South Africa in 1966 and moved to Vancouver with his family as a young boy. He now lives and paints for six months of the year in Fiji returning annually to Deep Cove, North Vancouver, British Columbia to exhibit and sell his work. His first book, A Selection of Neighbourly Birds of the New World, was published in 1987. He has published two other limited edition books with illustrations of birds.

    Scope and Content: The fonds includes original illustrations, various versions of the text, sketches, a mock-up, correspondence, and promotional material for The Parade to Paradise, a work for children.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Charles Van Sandwyk in 1992. [1992-18]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Van Sickle, Vernon

W

Waddell, Katherine

Waddington, Miriam

  • Warland, Betsy

    Betsy Warland fonds. - 1968-1994. - 10 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Author, editor and poet, Betsy Warland was born in Fort Dodge, Iowa in 1946. She studied at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa and at State College in Pennsylvania before immigrating to Canada in 1972. Her active participation in and coordination of various literary events and organizations resulted in her becoming a significant figure in the feminist and lesbian writing scene in Canada. She initiated and organized the Toronto Women's Writing Collective (1975-1981) and she helped conceive and co-ordinate the "Women and Words/Les femmes et les mots" conference held at the University of British Columbia in 1983. She participated in the Federation of B.C. Writers, the Special Council Committee on the Arts for the Vancouver City Council and was writer-in-residence at the Saskatoon Public Library. Warland has helped to publish the writings of many feminist writers through her work as editor of Telling It: Women and Language across Cultures (1990), InVersions: Writing by Dykes, Queers and Lesbians (1991), and through the journals (f)lip and Herizons.

    Her first poem appeared in an issue of Waves in 1976 and by 1981, she had published her first volume of poetry, A Gathering Instinct. This was followed by Open is Poroken (1984) and Serpent(w)rite (1987). She has also collaborated with Daphne Marlatt on two works, Double Negative (1986) and Two Women in a Birth (1994). Many of Warland's poems, essays, reviews and interviews have appeared in Canadian and international journals and anthologies. Warland lives in Saskatoon and is presently a member of the Writers Union of Canada and the Saskatchewan Writers Guild.

    Scope and Content: The Betsy Warland fonds consists of correspondence, manuscripts, personal documents, diaries and notebooks, numerous photographs, cassette recordings of interviews, readings and conference discussions, as well as, many publications and some interesting posters. Two additional boxes of files, labelled "context," consist of publicity material for various literary and arts events, newsletters, conference programs and other items, all in chronological order.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from Betsy Warland in 1996. [1996-04]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Weaver, Robert

  • Webb, Phyllis

    Phyllis Webb fonds. - 1951-1981. - 6.7 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Poet Phyllis Webb was born in Victoria, British Columbia in 1927. After studies in English literature and philosophy at the University of British Columbia, Webb moved to Montreal where she worked as a secretary and took courses at McGill University. During this period she became involved in a literary circle that included F.R. Scott, Louis Dudek and Irving Layton. Webb also lived in England, where she worked for CBC radio as a reporter and reviewer. Returning to Canada in 1959, she taught English literature at the University of British Columbia for four years and continued to write for the CBC on a freelance basis. Webb moved to Toronto in 1965, where she became a program organizer in the public affairs department and created the CBC radio program "Ideas", eventually becoming its executive producer. Webb returned to the West Coast and settled on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia in 1969.

    Since her first book Trio (along with the work of Gael Turnbull and Eli Mandel) was published in 1954, Webb has published 11 books during a 40-year career as a writer. Her collection The Vision Tree: Selected Poems, won a Governor General's Literary Award for poetry in 1982. Her poetry has been widely anthologized, and she has contributed articles and reviews to various prominent publications, as well as, held readings across Canada. Webb was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1992.

    Scope and Content: Phyllis Webb fonds includes worksheets, manuscripts and typescripts for Naked Poems, The Sea Is Also a Garden, Even Your Right Eye, Talking, Wilson's Bowl, Selected Poems: 1954-65, Sunday Water: Thirteen Anti-ghazals, Water and Light: Ghazals and Anti Ghazals: Poems and Hanging Fire; notebooks; correspondence; cassette tapes and photographs.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Phyllis Webb in several instalments. [1983-17, 1988-14, 1991-16, 1998-02]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: some correspondence restricted.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

Weber, Ephraim

Whalon, Moira

Whyte-Edgar, Mrs. C.M.

  • Wilkie, Daniel

    Daniel Wilkie fonds. - 1796-1848. - 2 volumes.

    Biographical Sketch: Teacher, author, Presbyterian clergyman and journalist, Daniel Wilkie was a prominent member of the Quebec City élite of his day. He was born in Scotland in 1777 and educated at the University of Glasgow where he undertook Divinity Studies. In 1803, he received his M.A. and immigrated to Canada. He was active in the Quebec Philosophical Society, the Quebec Emigrants' Society, the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec and the St. Andrew's Society of Quebec. He founded several schools and taught many of the political and intellectual leaders of Quebec, both French and English.

    Scope and Content: The Daniel Wilkie fonds includes his diary for 1846 to 1848; manuscript volume containing notes on books, sermons and lectures for the period 1796 to 1811, and a list of Wilkie's writings, 1804 to 1845.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from a descendant of Daniel Wilkie in 1980. [1989-07]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Wyatt, Rachel

    Rachel Wyatt fonds. - 1937-1991. - 8 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: Writer and playwright, Rachel Wyatt was born in England in 1929 and has lived in Canada since 1957. She began her career as a non-fiction writer for magazines and newspapers and then wrote for radio and television. She is well-known as a prolific writer of radio plays. Between 1971 and 1990 over seventy of her radio plays were produced by CBC radio and BBC radio. Wyatt has written four novels including Foreign Bodies (1982); successful stage plays including Chairs and Tables and Crackpot; and short stories including the collection, The Day Marlene Dietrich Died (1996). Rachel Wyatt was Director of the Writing Program at the Banff Centre for the Arts during the 1990s and has appeared at writer's conferences across Canada and internationally. She won the CBC Literary Competition Drama Award, First Prize in 1982, and her work has appeared in many anthologies.

    Scope and Content: The Rachel Wyatt fonds includes personal correspondence; notebooks, manuscripts and typescripts of writings in all genres; promotional materials; and documentation related to professional activities.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired from the author in 1992 and 1997. [1992-03, 1997-01]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: restrictions on correspondence.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available.

  • Wyse, Alex

    Alex and Anne Wyse fonds. - 1968-1989. - 6 m of graphic material and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: The husband and wife team of Anne and Alex Wyse have published three significant, innovative and award-winning books for children: Alphabet Book (1969); The One to Fifty Book (1973); History Mystery: The Ottawa Book (1981). The first two books were designed collaboratively with Algonkian band children aged from six to twelve years old at Kettle Point on Lake Huron. Each book received several awards including the American Institute of Graphic Arts 50 Best Books of the Year Award. Similarly, History Mystery was the product of collaboration with children aged from eight to eleven years old from the Ottawa school board area.

    Scope and Content: For each book there is a set of original drawings, lino blocks, enlarged typography, publisher's proofs and documentation related to research and final publication.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Alex and Anne Wyse in 1989. [1989-18]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: preliminary finding aid available.

Y

  • Yates, J. Michael

    J. Michael Yates fonds. - 1965-1980. - 12 m of textual record and other material.

    Biographical Sketch: J. Michael Yates was born in Fulton, Missouri in 1938. He received his high school education in Wiesbaden, West Germany and obtained a B.A. and M.A. (1961) from the University of Kansas City, then studied comparative literature at the University of Michigan. He taught comparative literature at several universities in the United States between 1963 and 1966 before serving as professor of creative writing and as writer-in-residence at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He encouraged the creation of several literary periodicals at the University and in 1966 founded the Sono Nis Press which specializes in literary publications. He ran this press until 1976, publishing nearly fifty books, including several of his own works. Yates has produced over a dozen publications in the genres of poetry, fiction and drama. He is considered a key figure in the development of "West Coast surrealism". Following a car accident in 1978, Yates took a job as a prison guard. His work Line Screw (1993) is a memoir of his years working in prison for which Yates won the Vancouver Prize. J. Michael Yates received Major Hopwood awards for Poetry and Drama from the University of Michigan, the International Broadcasting Excellence Award and the Look of Books Award.

    Scope and Content: The J. Michael Yates fonds contains correspondence; manuscripts and typescripts of poems, prose, drama, including Canticle for Electronic Music, The Great Bear Lake Meditations, Parallax, The Qualicum Physics, and The Abstract Beast; Sono Nis Press archive (1969-1975); and photographs.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from the author in several instalments. [1983-04, 1989-02, 1994-08]

    Language: material in the fonds is in English.

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: finding aid available for first accession.

Yeigh, Frank

  • Young Canada's Book Week

    Young Canada's Book Week fonds. - 1949-1968. - 2 m of graphic material and textual record.

    Administrative History: Based on the Children's Book Week celebrated in the United States, the Canadian Library Association promoted the idea of Young Canada's Book Week as early as 1947. The Book Week was seen as an opportunity for children's librarians to "step outside of their usual sphere of influence - the library and the school - and to bring our work to the attention of individuals or groups who do not necessarily know the various functions the library performs in their community" (Canadian Library Association Bulletin, Oct. 1947, vol. 4, no. 1). The first Young Canada's Book Week was held November 12 to 19, 1949, under the patronage of the Viscountess Alexander of Tunis.

    Scope and Content: The fonds documents Young Canada's Book Week events through scrapbooks and posters. Also included is original artwork for some of the posters.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: acquired by the National Library of Canada in 1992. [1992-26]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: brief listing available.

Z

  • Zeller, Ludwig

    Ludwig Zeller fonds. - 1977-78. - 26 collages; 48.5 cm by 38 cm and textual material.

    Biographical Sketch: Artist, Ludwig Zeller was born in Chili, in 1927. He is involved in both the visual arts and literary work, alternating his attentions between gallery exhibits and publications. He has held numerous solo exhibits in Canada, in South America and the United States. Currently, he lives in Toronto, Ontario.

    Scope and Content: The fonds consists of 26 collages accompanied by manuscript and typescript of text in Spanish, English and French, and by pencil sketches for the illustrations. Published as Alphacollage by Porcupine's Quill, 1979.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received from Ludwig Zeller in 1987. [1987-04]

    Restrictions: none.

    Finding Aid: none.

  • Zwicky, Jan

    Jan Zwicky fonds - Oct. 5, 1981-1996 - 2.2 meters of textual record.

    Biographical Sketch: A native of Alberta, Jan Zwicky is a poet, musician and philosopher. Author of a number of works of poetry: including Where Have We Been (1982), Wittgenstein Elegies (1986), and The New Room (1989). Jan Zwicky was awarded the Governor General's Literary Award for Poetry in 1999 for her Songs for Relinquishing the Earth (1998). Jan Zwicky has also been an editor for Brick Books since 1986.

    Jan Zwicky received a B.A. from the University of Calgary and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. She has taught at a number of North American Universities: teaching philosophy at Princeton, philosophy and interdisciplinary studies at the University of Waterloo; philosophy at the University of Western Ontario; philosophy and creative writing at the University of New Brunswick; philosophy at the University of Alberta; and she has been teaching philosophy at the University of Victoria since 1996. Jan Zwicky was on faculty at the Banff Centre Writing Studio in 1995 and in 2001.

    Jan Zwicky has a long-held interest in the philosophy of Viennese philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and in environmental concerns. She is also a violinist and worked in many orchestras including the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra London and the Windsor Symphony as well as many chamber music ensembles.

    Jan Zwicky is an essayist on music, philosophy and poetry and her poetic, musical and philosophical interests intertwine in her works of poetry and in her works of philosophy. Her works of poetry display this melding of interest most notably in Wittgenstein Elegies and in the dialogic poem "Kant and Bruckner" in Songs for Relinquishing the Earth. Lyric Philosophy (1992) argues that philosophy must expand its self-definition beyond analysis if it is to be true to its own ideals, and to many of the works it includes in its canon. Its two central metaphysical notions, lyric and domesticity, are developed against the backdrop of systematic analysis. They are rooted in an exploration of the concept of time, and form the basis of a re-reading of Wittgenstein. The text's format is double: Zwicky's own fragments (left side) are paired against excerpts from other philosophers, and of music, visual art and poetry. Through these ways of combining and providing ground for philosophy, literature and music to interact Jan Zwicky is a multi-disciplinary artist and scholar.

    Scope and Content: The fonds contain: correspondence; drafts and accompanying proofs and notes for Zwicky's works of poetry and prose from the 1980s and early 1990s as well as material from her work as an editor. The fonds contain the following series: Series I. Correspondence, Series II. Poetry, Series III. Philosophy, and Series IV. Editorial Work.

    Immediate Source of Acquisition: received directly from Jan Zwicky in 2001 [2001-04].

    Restrictions on Access and Use: Jan Zwicky's written permission must be obtained in order to view material. Several correspondence files are restricted and cannot be accessed by researchers for a period of 50 years [until 2051].

    Finding Aid: Detailed finding aid available; file level control.

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