Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) 2015-2016



ISSN: 2292-4914

Table of contents

Minister's message

The Honourable Shelly Glover - Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Every year, the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Portfolio organizations, including Library and Archives Canada (LAC), carry out their mandate diligently and efficiently to ensure all Canadians can benefit from our rich arts, heritage and cultural sectors. They foster innovation, while underscoring the importance of our history and our official languages. As we prepare to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, in 2017, we will mark several important anniversaries this year, including the 50th anniversary of our national flag and the 200th anniversary of the birth of Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's first Prime Minister. It is the perfect opportunity to acknowledge our Portfolio organizations' commitment to making Canada a country that is proud of its past and ready to face the challenges of the future.

LAC will take a proactive approach by participating in Government of Canada activities organized to commemorate those great moments in our history. The mandate of LAC is to ensure that Canada's continuing memory reflects Canadian society and is available to present and future generations. In 2015–16, LAC will strive to make its collection more visible and easier to access by providing services that meet the needs of all its clients. In collaboration with its partners—such as public libraries, research libraries, museums and other institutions across the country—LAC plans to convey the full significance and richness of its collection to a broader audience.

LAC will implement an action plan to better identify government documents of historical interest, while continuing to acquire resource material representative of Canadian society. These resources, which are testament to our unique society, help us learn more about our country's history. Moreover, LAC will continue to innovate in the digital environment in order to manage, conserve and provide long-term access to its vast collection.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, I am pleased to present Canadians with the Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–16 prepared by Library and Archives Canada. I invite anyone wishing to learn about LAC's responsibilities, priorities and activities to read this report. 


 

The Honourable Shelly Glover, P.C., M.P.

Message from the Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Dr. Guy Berthiaume - Librarian and Archivist of CanadaFrom the time the National Archives were established in 1872, Canada has held a vast and diverse collection of documentary heritage that reflects the richness of our past and will leave an invaluable cultural heritage for future generations. 

Eleven years after the ambitious merger of the National Archives with the National Library, LAC is at a crossroads. Advances in technology have changed our users' habits and expectations, but they have also made it possible for our institution to undergo a true renaissance in terms of the way we acquire, preserve and provide access to our holdings. 

When I arrived at LAC, I proposed four commitments to my colleagues and partners for the duration of my mandate. These aim to make LAC an institution that:

  1. Is dedicated to serving all its clients, which means adjusting and adapting as the needs of Canadians change, and organizing our information resources to make them accessible;
  2. Is a leader in archival and library science, records management and new technologies, so that the experience, imagination and expertise of our employees enable Canadians to better connect with our holdings;
  3. Is proactively involved with national and international networks to ensure that we can benefit from the experience of our partners and that they can draw on ours; and
  4. Has greater public visibility, thereby highlighting the value of our holdings and our services.

The holdings in LAC's collection are unique and valued by Canadians who consult them, both on our website and in person at 395 Wellington Street in Ottawa. As the new Librarian and Archivist of Canada, I am committed to increasing our visibility and to better meeting the changing needs of Canadians, who wish to have direct and immediate access to our collection. 

This Report on Plans and Priorities presents our commitments and the actions we plan to take to fulfill them. It shows that we are determined to create an institution that will enable Canadians to better understand not only who they are, but also where they have come from.

 

Guy Berthiaume

 


 

Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

Organizational profile

Responsible Minister: Shelly Glover, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Deputy Head: Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Ministerial portfolio: Department of Canadian Heritage

Year created: 2004

Primary legislative authority: Library and Archives of Canada Act, S.C. 2004, c. 11

Other:

  • Acronym: LAC

    Headquarters
    550 De la Cité Boulevard
    Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0N4
    Canada

    Telephone: 613-996-5115
    Telephone (toll-free): 1-866-578-7777
    Facsimile: 613-995-6274
    Email: BAC.reference.LAC@canada.ca
    Website: www.bac-lac.gc.ca

Organizational context

Raison d'être

Under the Library and Archives of Canada Act, the mandate of Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is as follows:

  • to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of current and future generations;
  • to serve as a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society;
  • to facilitate in Canada co-operation among the communities involved in the acquisition, preservation, and diffusion of knowledge; and
  • to serve as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions.

Responsibilities

Three pillars support LAC's mandate in the management of documentary heritage:

1. Appraisal and acquisition of information resources

LAC is responsible for collecting information resources that are relevant to Canadian society and the Government of Canada. Its appraisal and acquisition process is based on the following components:

  • a) legal deposit, whose provisions are set out in the Library and Archives of Canada Act and the Legal Deposit of Publications Regulations and require publishers to provide LAC with copies of all the works they publish in Canada.
  • b) the acquisition of information resources of archival and historical value from Government of Canada departments and agencies. They are primarily political, legal and administrative records attesting to government decisions and activities.
  • c) the acquisition of information resources that are representative of Canadian society through means such as private donations, purchases or web harvesting.

2. Preservation of information resources

Over the years, LAC has built a vast collection that brings together, notably, the collections of the former National Archives of Canada (established in 1872) and the former National Library of Canada (established in 1953). The collection has a variety of information resources, both analogue and digital, including books, government publications, maps, works of art, photographs, and audio and video recordings.

LAC is responsible for preserving this collection so that it stands the test of time and remains accessible to current and future generations. LAC carries out this responsibility in two ways: first, by relying on the expertise and know-how of its employees who specialize in preservation and digitization; and second, by making optimal use of the infrastructures that prevent the deterioration of records and preserve their long-term integrity, such as the Preservation Centre, the Nitrate Film Preservation Facility, and the new high-density collection storage facility.

3. Access to documentary heritage

LAC's responsibilities for ensuring access to documentary heritage include offering a variety of ways for clients to consult items that interest them. This pillar of the mandate is also consistent with the Government of Canada's commitment to open government.

LAC's clients have easy access to Canada's documentary heritage, in person through on-site visits and virtually through its website and the sites of its partners. LAC ensures that its holdings are properly described so that search engines find them easily.

More and more clients prefer digital when it comes to accessing documentary heritage. For this reason, LAC is integrating digital services, such as digital reprography, into all its orientation and reference services, which are provided in person, by telephone, via email or by mail.

Because of the digitization projects being carried out by LAC and its partners, clients now have online access to a greater number of information resources from LAC's collection.

LAC's documentary heritage is also featured in the exhibitions that it organizes independently or with other documentary heritage institutions, thereby promoting Canadian culture or highlighting specific historical events.

Strategic outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

1. Strategic outcome: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

  • 1.1 Program: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools
  • 1.2 Program: Collaboration in the management of government records
2. Strategic outcome: Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations
  • 2.1 Program: Documentation of Canadian society
  • 2.2 Program: Stewardship of documentary heritage
  • 2.3 Program: Access to documentary heritage
Internal services: Meet program needs and fulfill the organization's other obligations.

 

Organizational priorities

In recent years, LAC has pursued innovative efforts to better fulfill its mandate in the context of the digital environment. In the coming years, LAC will work to maximize the visibility and accessibility of its collection by offering services that meet the needs of its clients. The organizational priorities that form the basis of this report directly support the objectives in LAC's legislated mandate:

  1. Acquire information resources that are representative of Canadian society.
  2. Preserve documentary heritage in analogue and digital formats.
  3. Offer quality services and programs to Canadians and provide access to as much content as possible using digital technologies.
  4. Adopt a more collaborative approach to fulfill the mandate and support documentary heritage communities.
  5. Develop the infrastructure and the skills needed to manage documentary heritage in the 21st century.

Priority 1

Type

Strategic outcomes and/or programs

Acquire information resources that are representative of Canadian society

Ongoing

Strategic outcomes 1 and 2
Programs 1.1, 1.2 and 2.1

Description

Why is this a priority?

LAC has a mandate to establish Canada's documentary heritage, which is relevant to Canadian society and the Government of Canada. To do this, LAC will continue to enrich its holdings that reflect this heritage, through the appraisal, acquisition and processing of published and unpublished information resources produced in both analogue and digital formats.

LAC will improve its appraisal and acquisition approach to obtain and quickly process information resources. In 2015–16, LAC will focus on managing the backlog of Government of Canada information resources that have accumulated since they were transferred by other departments. LAC will continue to develop disposition instruments with federal institutions. These measures, which are in response to recent recommendations made by the Office of the Auditor General, will help to provide greater access to government records.

Plans for meeting this priority

  • Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act in order to give them comprehensive disposition coverage.
  • Process the backlog of government records that have accumulated since they were transferred by other departments and agencies.
  • Acquire digital content through web harvesting and through the implementation of strategies facilitating the transfer of digital material to LAC.
  • Acquire documentary heritage that is relevant to Canadians.
  • Develop an action plan to acquire records of archival and historical value from parliamentarians following the 2015 federal election.

Priority 2

Type

Strategic outcomes and/or programs

Preserve documentary heritage in analogue and digital formats

Ongoing

Strategic outcome 2
Program 2.2

Description

Why is this a priority?
Given the numerous challenges, such as the fragility of some older formats and the gradual disappearance of technologies previously used, LAC must rely on various techniques and strategies to preserve the integrity of the content for which it is responsible. LAC uses restoration, environmental controls for storage, migration to durable media and, increasingly, digitization. The purpose of using these methods is to preserve documentary heritage and thereby provide greater access to LAC's collection for current and future generations.

Plans for meeting this priority

  • Continue to carry out the strategy for migrating audiovisual content and digital media stored on obsolete formats to digital formats to prevent their deterioration and preserve their content.
  • Support activities designed to preserve LAC's holdings and make them available through restoration, conservation and digitization.
  • Continue to develop tools that enable LAC to become a trusted digital repository (TDR), while improving the bandwidth platform and increasing LAC's storage capacity to meet the need created by the increase in digital information.

Priority 3

Type

Strategic outcomes and/or programs

Offer quality services and programs to Canadians and provide access to as much content as possible using digital technologies

Ongoing

Strategic outcome 2
Program 2.3

Description

Why is this a priority?

Access to its collection remains a focus at LAC, and Canadians expect to quickly find online what they are interested in. To meet the needs of the population, the institution will continue its digitization efforts to make more content of interest available online. Furthermore, LAC will renew its online catalogues to ensure that search applications are user-friendly and thus offer Canadians better tools to access content.
LAC also plans to offer quality services to its clients by focusing on a diversified approach that provides researchers with general reference and specialized services to facilitate research.

Plans for meeting this priority

  • Continue digitization projects in partnership with other documentary heritage organizations.
  • Maintain LAC's contribution to the government-wide initiative of open government by applying a practice of proactively reviewing holdings, which will help to lift restrictions on access; and by developing an action plan to enhance the Government of Canada's virtual library, which offers open data sets.
  • Renew the AMICUS database containing over 25 million bibliographic records so that this critical resource for Canadian libraries can leverage new technological advances and fully meet clients' needs.
  • Increase the visibility of the collection by organizing exhibitions that will fully promote its importance and wealth to a broader public.

Priority 4

Type

Strategic outcomes and/or programs

Adopt a more collaborative approach to fulfill LAC's mandate and support documentary heritage communities

Ongoing

Strategic outcomes 1 and 2
Programs 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3

Description

Why is this a priority?
LAC and documentary heritage institutions, such as libraries, archives, museums and other similar organizations, are taking advantage of increased collaboration to appraise, acquire, preserve, describe and facilitate access to Canada's documentary heritage. LAC is working with its partners and stakeholders by sharing information, discussing common issues and making use of each other's strengths through partnership agreements.

Plans for meeting this priority

  • Increase the capacity of Canadian documentary heritage communities.
  • Contribute to the Government of Canada's initiatives leading up to the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017.
  • Increase collaboration with documentary heritage organizations (primarily libraries, archives and museums).
  • Continue to work with the academic community by organizing conferences, round tables and other forums for exchanging ideas.
  • Strengthen LAC's presence among international organizations of librarians and archivists, in particular through commitments with non-government organizations [such as the International Council on Archives (ICA), the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), the Association Internationale des Archives Francophones (AIAF), UNESCO, and so on].
  • Continue to develop policy instruments based on LAC's collaborative approach.

Priority 5

Type

Strategic outcomes and/or programs

Develop the infrastructure and the skills needed to manage documentary heritage in the 21st century

Ongoing

Strategic outcomes 1 and 2
Program 3.0 (Internal services)

Description

Why is this a priority?
The goals associated with this priority contribute to making LAC a leading institution in archival and library science and new technologies because of the quality of all its employees. To achieve its goals, LAC plans to build on and invest in the expertise of its current employees and in the technologies they use to manage the LAC collection and serve clients.

With regard to physical infrastructure, LAC is working to develop innovative solutions to ensure sustainable management of the spaces used to preserve its analogue collection (paper records, maps, etc.).

Plans for meeting this priority

  • Continue to develop a long-term infrastructure strategy to meet needs related to preservation space and access to information resources, while improving the conditions for preserving documentary heritage in analogue format.
  • Implement a client-based digital strategy to support LAC's way of fulfilling its mandate.
  • Provide the necessary support and direction for developing the competencies that will enable LAC to be a leading institution in documentary heritage management.
  • Review LAC's business processes to make them as effective and efficient as possible.

Risk analysis

LAC has formalized its practices and developed a corporate risk profile that identifies corporate and strategic risks, assesses their potential consequences and impacts, and includes measures to reduce these risks. The profile targets four strategic risks that may have a direct effect on the fulfillment of LAC's mandate. These risks, the description of their context, and the proposed mitigation strategies are presented in the section that follows. 

Description of the context for each risk

1. The risk that Canadian documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

Given the ever-increasing quantity of information created via new technologies and the speed at which this information can disappear, LAC runs the risk of not acquiring Canadian documentary heritage of national interest. The scope of its mandate is such that LAC runs the risk of not being able to identify all the content that should be acquired.

2. The risk that documentary heritage is not preserved for current and future generations

Once information resources have been acquired, LAC must ensure their physical or digital integrity and long-term accessibility. Integrity of the material can be compromised by a variety of external risk factors, such as deterioration over time and with use, and the obsolescence of technologies needed to consult a format that is outdated. The loss of technical expertise and the lack of physical or virtual space offering adequate storage conditions are considered internal risk factors.

3. The risk that documentary heritage is not available to current and future generations

Despite technological advances, most of LAC's collection is on paper or other analogue media. The time and effort needed to digitize it, make it discoverable and make it available online are such that LAC must target its efforts to quickly provide access to material that is of greatest interest to its clients and to Canadian society.

4. The risk that Government of Canada institutions do not use regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools developed by LAC

The quantity of information created in the government on a daily basis poses a considerable challenge when it comes to identifying records that have administrative, legal or historical value. Sound management of government information is therefore essential; it ensures the government's accountability and the best use of information to support decision making within organizations.

Risk

Risk response strategy

Link to Program Alignment Architecture

1. The risk that Canadian documentary heritage of national interest is not acquired

  • Develop an acquisition strategy and continue efforts devoted to the appraisal, acquisition and processing of records on specialized media (documentary art and photography; audiovisual records; architectural drawings; plans and maps; geospatial data resources; philatelic materials; and rare books).
  • Acquire digital content through web harvesting and through the implementation of strategies designed to facilitate the transfer of digital material to LAC.
  • Finish processing the backlog of government records that have accumulated since they were transferred by other departments and agencies.

 

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.1

2. The risk that documentary heritage is not preserved for current and future generations

  • Maintain the necessary infrastructure and expertise to ensure the long-term preservation of holdings.
  • Continue to digitize LAC content by using the institution's full capacity and by leveraging its partners' capacity to further preserve digital content.
  • Continue to migrate the most at-risk analogue information resources.
  • In partnership with Shared Services Canada, continue to implement the strategy aimed at increasing digital data management and storage capacity.
  • Maintain collaboration and encourage information sharing with preservation experts from other documentary heritage institutions and associations.
  • Develop a long-term infrastructure strategy that will enable LAC to make strategic decisions to meet future preservation needs.

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.2

3. The risk that documentary heritage is not available to current and future generations

  • Increase access to documentary heritage by partnering with others to advance digitization projects aimed at digitizing and publishing content online that is most frequently requested.
  • Work with partners in the documentary heritage community to increase the visibility of LAC's collection.
  • Continue to deliver expert in-person services by means of multiple delivery channels, such as on-site consultation and direct assistance offered at a distance.
  • Continue to share content on social networks, namely through the blog, podcasts, FlickrFacebookTwitter and YouTube to reach a maximum number of clients and to make the collection discoverable through a wide range of distribution channels.
  • Design new online resources (including databases, guides and digital content) and update existing resources.
  • Continue with the renewal of the AMICUS database, a catalogue that contains the information resources of hundreds of libraries across Canada.

Strategic outcome 2.0
Program 2.3

4. The risk that Government of Canada institutions do not use regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools developed by LAC

  • Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act.
  • Provide departments with generic valuation tools to support them in their recordkeeping.

Strategic outcome 1.0
Programs 1.1 and 1.2

Planned expenditures

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

2017–18
Planned spending

93,011,489

93,011,489

92,713,289

92,713,289

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

867

867

867

Budgetary planning summary for strategic outcomes and programs (dollars)

Strategic outcomes, programs and internal services

2012–13
Expenditures

2013–14
Expenditures

2014–15
Forecast spending

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

2016–17
Planned spending

2017–18
Planned spending

Strategic outcome 1: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

1,442,234

2,694,577

4,413,575

2,753,175

2,753,175

2,708,801

2,708,801

1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

6,432,497

8,506,781

9,716,965

6,212,732

6,212,732

6,112,599

6,112,599

Strategic outcome 1 Subtotal

7,874,731

11,201,358

14,130,540

8,965,907

8,965,907

8,821,400

8,821,400

Strategic outcome 2: Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations

2.1: Documentation of Canadian society

13,834,998

15,112,669

12,848,207

11,591,441

11,591,441

11,404,617

11,404,617

2.2: Stewardship of documentary heritage

31,878,165

18,019,293

19,062,076

16,742,862

16,742,862

16,473,010

16,473,010

2.3: Access to documentary heritage

35,649,520

31,959,088

31,892,782

29,762,349

29,762,349

30,483,563

30,483,563

Strategic outcome 2
Subtotal

81,362,683

65,091,050

63,803,065

58,096,652

58,096,652

58,361,190

58,361,190

Internal services
Subtotal

29,685,818

24,511,284

28,728,526

25,948,930

25,948,930

25,530,699

25,530,699

Total

118,923,232

100,803,692

106,662,131

93,011,489

93,011,489

92,713,289

92,713,289

 Major fluctuations in expenditures for the programs are mainly explained by:

  • Fluctuations in expenditures for program 2.2 "Stewardship of documentary heritage" are mainly explained by costs related to the conversion of a commercial building in Gatineau, Quebec, into a collection storage facility with a high-density shelving system, which will be completed by 2014–15.
  • Fluctuations in expenditures for program 2.3 "Access to documentary heritage" are mainly explained by savings achieved as a result of Economic Action Plan 2012.
  • The increase in forecast spending for internal services in 2014–15 is explained by investments in infrastructure required to adapt to LAC's new service model.

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of the 2015–16 planned spending with the whole-of-government framework (dollars)

Strategic
outcome

Program

Spending area

Government of Canada outcome

2015–16 Planned spending

1. Current government information is managed to support government accountability

1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

2,753,175

1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

Government Affairs

A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

6,212,732

2. Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations

2.1: Documentation of Canadian society

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

11,591,441

2.2: Stewardship of documentary heritage

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

16,742,862

2.3: Access to documentary heritage

Social Affairs

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

29,762,349

Total planned spending by spending areas (dollars)

Spending areas

Total planned spending

Economic Affairs

0

Social Affairs

58,096,652

International Affairs

0

Government Affairs

8,965,907

Departmental spending trend

The following image indicates the yearly departmental spending trend (amount in dollars). 2012–13 Total Spending: 118,923,232 $. 2013–14 Total Spending: 98,704,654 $. 2014–15 Total Spending: 95,864,788$. 2015–16 Total Spending: 92,587,508$. 2016–17 Total Spending: 92,587,508$. 2017–18 Total Spending: 92,587,508$

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
 

LAC's total spending will decrease to $92.7 million beginning in 2016–17 and onwards. Spending fluctuations are mainly attributable to the following factors:

  • Total ongoing savings of $9.6 million were achieved as a result of Economic Action Plan 2012. The decrease in spending that began in 2012–13 has continued in 2014–15.
  • The collection storage facility project will be completed by 2014–15. LAC will then have received a total of $32.4 million (from 2009–10 to 2014–15) for the conversion of a commercial building in Gatineau, Quebec, to a collection storage facility with a high-density shelving system. Spending for this project peaked in 2012–13 when most of the major construction work was being carried out.
  • Public Works and Government Services Canada transferred funds as a result of savings achieved through the merger of records storage buildings and the decrease in accommodation requirements. This enabled LAC to invest additional funds in its infrastructure to support the new service model, so that from 2014–15, planned spending will have increased by $5 million.

Estimates by vote

More information on Library and Archives Canada's appropriations is available in the 2015–16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's website.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

LAC also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Section II: Analysis of programs by strategic outcomes

Strategic outcome 1: Current government information is managed to support government accountability

Program 1.1: Development of regulatory instruments and recordkeeping tools

Library and Archives Canada (LAC), working collaboratively with central agencies, federal departments and agencies, and other stakeholders, plays a lead role in developing standards, tools and best practices for information management and recordkeeping. LAC facilitates the management of information within federal institutions by evaluating information resources, by issuing records disposition authorities and by developing tools, guides and guidelines that support the implementation of sound recordkeeping practices. Furthermore, LAC provides input on information management policy by participating in many intergovernmental committees.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

2,753,175

2,753,175

2,708,801

2,708,801

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

26

26

26

Performance measurement

Expected results

Performance indicators

Targets

Completion date

A regulatory regime is established across the Government of Canada so that government information is managed and disposed of appropriately

Percentage of federal government institutions supported by complete records disposition coverage

30%

March 31, 2016

Planning highlights

LAC plays an essential role in acquiring, preserving and facilitating access to Canada's documentary heritage, in particular by serving as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada. This role entails acquiring federal records of historical and archival value from almost 200 federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act.

In 2015–16, LAC will expedite the issuance and update of disposition authorities granted to federal institutions. Disposition authorities specify the way of processing records that no longer have business value at the end of their retention period. These records are either transferred to the LAC collection (when they have archival or historical value) or alienated or disposed of (when they are no longer of value to Canadians).

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Expedite the issuance of disposition instruments to federal institutions that are subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act to give them comprehensive disposition coverage.
  • Continue negotiations with federal institutions that are not subject to the Library and Archives of Canada Act to ensure sound recordkeeping.

Program 1.2: Collaboration in the management of government records

LAC provides support, services and training to help federal institutions manage their information and comply with the requirements of the Directive on Recordkeeping. LAC advises and guides federal institutions through multiple activities:

  • provides regulatory, policy, strategic and business advice on recordkeeping and records management to central agencies and other federal government institutions;
  • prepares and delivers training and awareness sessions to federal public servants;
  • establishes networks in the Government of Canada information management community;
  • organizes seminars and forums on recordkeeping. LAC prepares guidelines and other tools that support federal institutions in applying disposition authorities;
  • coordinates certain initiatives that support the efforts of federal libraries and their respective departments.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

6,212,732

6,212,732

6,112,599

6,112,599

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

82

82

82

Performance measurement

Expected results

Performance indicators

Targets

Completion date

Increased capacity and readiness to manage Government of Canada information effectively

Percentage of federal government institutions that undertake disposition activities in accordance with their disposition instruments

 75%

March 31, 2016

Note: Activities include a wide range of disposition activities, tools, actions and instruments that are related to the management of government records.

Planning highlights

In 2015–16, LAC will continue to implement its Disposition and Recordkeeping Program within the federal government. It will continue to develop recordkeeping tools and provide federal institutions with disposition instruments, while providing advice and guidance. This framework will enable federal institutions to implement sound disposition and recordkeeping practices, thereby helping them to better manage their information resources of business value.

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Continue to support Government of Canada departments and agencies by developing recordkeeping tools and by providing advice and guidance to federal institutions on sound disposition and recordkeeping practices.
  • Continue to collaborate with Government of Canada departments and agencies and with central agencies to plan for the increase in digital volume and to establish LAC's needs.
  • Continue to implement the new storage model for government information resources, according to which LAC collaborates with departments and agencies to help them dispose of their records of business value that are stored in regional centres.
  • Develop and implement a directive that will include detailed requirements to support government institutions. This commitment is in line with the initiatives of an open government, which recommends that federal government institutions minimize access restrictions to their information resources of enduring value before transferring them to LAC.
  • Provide leadership in government-wide recordkeeping and information management initiatives as follows:
    • LAC will continue to participate in the Arctic Council's activities to establish policies and training tools for the archival system for standard records, which will improve the management of and access to these records. (The Arctic Council is an international organization composed of eight countries, including Canada which has assumed the chairmanship from 2013 to 2015; the Council's chairmanship will be transferred to the United States in 2015.)
    • LAC will play an active role in revising the ISO 15489 standard on records management.
    • LAC will co-chair, in partnership with the Treasury Board Secretariat, symposiums, training sessions and discussions on recordkeeping and information management.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada's continuing memory is documented and accessible to current and future generations

Program 2.1: Documentation of Canadian society

One of the pillars of LAC's mandate is to ensure that Canada's continuing memory reflects Canadian society and is available to current and future generations. LAC's holdings consist of published and unpublished information resources in a variety of formats and media, both analogue and digital.

The majority of LAC's acquisitions are governed by legal texts, as follows:

  • in accordance with the Legal Deposit of Publications Regulations, Canadian publishers must deposit a copy of all information resources they publish with LAC;
  • under the Library and Archives of Canada Act, government information resources of archival and historical value must be transferred to LAC once their retention period has expired.

Lastly, LAC acquires private information resources that represent Canadian society—past and present.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

 2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

11,591,441

11,591,441

11,404,617

11,404,617

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

130

130

130

Performance measurement

Expected results

Performance indicators

Targets

Completion date

Library and Archives Canada effectively acquires documentary heritage

Percentage of answers given to individuals and organizations that meet service standards

95%

March 31, 2016

Planning highlights

In 2015–16, the institution will focus on maintaining high-quality standards for the services provided to clients that help enrich LAC's collection (creators, donors, publishers and federal departments). It will also focus on reducing acquisition backlogs (for private archives and government records).

In addition, LAC will make it easier to acquire digital records by continuing to set up new portals for transferring digital content and data. This will enable LAC to continue acquiring material created on the Web in order to build a heritage collection that reflects new methods of documentary production.

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Continue acquiring documentary heritage that is relevant to Canadians.
  • Finish, by the end of 2015, processing the backlog of government records that have accumulated since being transferred by other departments and agencies, and take the necessary measures to prevent this type of situation from recurring. The elimination of the backlog will enable Canadians to research government records of national interest.
  • Clear the private archives processing backlog to make those archives discoverable.
  • Continue with web harvesting so that key events and topics of interest to Canadians are documented for current and future generations.
  • Develop and implement an action plan to acquire records from parliamentarians following the 2015 federal election.
  • Continue developing and renewing all evaluation and acquisition framework policies.

Program 2.2: Stewardship of documentary heritage

LAC manages a vast collection of materials in a wide variety of formats, both digital and analogue, to ensure their long-term preservation and accessibility. Traditional and cutting-edge archival and preservation techniques ensure the long-term preservation of relevant materials in both analogue and digital formats.

The preservation of these records includes all management activities and strategies aimed at ensuring the integrity, authenticity and availability of Canada's documentary heritage. There are various types of stewardship activities: those related to the physical management of the collection, such as storage; those involving restoration, which include preventing records from deteriorating and repairing already damaged records; and those associated with reproduction and the making of replacement copies, which ensure the preservation and availability of records that would otherwise be too fragile to access.

For digital records, innovative strategies are implemented to maintain access and to ensure that the originals are protected through proper transfer and storage.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

16,742,862

16,742,862

16,473,010

16,473,010

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

124

124

124

Performance measurement

Expected results

Performance indicators

Targets

Completion date

The LAC collection is safeguarded for current and future generations

Percentage of at-risk audiovisual material migrated from an obsolete format to a widely used digital format

67%

March 31, 2016

Percentage increase of digital material stored (includes both born-digital and digitized records)

20%

March 31, 2016

Planning highlights

LAC is continuing to carry out its main activities related to preserving its collection in analogue format, such as the management of storage conditions, circulation, preservation, restoration and digitization to ensure the collection's sustainability and availability.

As LAC continues to acquire analogue content, the need for physical space for preservation keeps on increasing. LAC will continue developing and implementing its long-term infrastructure plan to meet these growing needs, while optimizing the use of existing space.

Regarding the management of its digital holdings, LAC is pursuing its efforts to ultimately become a trusted digital repository that will ensure the comprehensive and integrated management of digital documentary heritage. It closely monitors advances in technology and in products available to ensure the long-term stability and cost-effectiveness of its digital infrastructure, including its digital storage tools and bandwidths.

LAC must also carry on the strategy for migrating audiovisual content and digital media stored on obsolete formats to current digital formats to ensure their long-term preservation and accessibility.

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Continue to advance the strategy for migrating audiovisual content and digital media stored on obsolete formats to current digital formats to ensure content preservation and accessibility.
  • Pursue mass digitization projects, in collaboration with partners, for microfilms and content related to the First World War.
  • Increase efforts to restore, preserve and digitize the collection in analogue format.
  • Continue to develop and implement the long-term infrastructure plan to meet the institution's future needs for preservation space.
  • Continue to renew the stewardship policy suite and develop a directive on digitization.

Program 2.3: Access to documentary heritage

This program aims to make Canadian information resources known and available to Canadians and to anyone interested in Canada, its society or its history. By providing access, LAC contributes to creating new knowledge that will increase the understanding of Canadian society.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

29,762,349

29,762,349

30,483,563

30,483,563

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

282

282

282

Performance measurement

Expected results

Performance indicators

Targets

Completion date

Improved access to Canada's documentary heritage

Percentage increase of digital material downloaded by clients from LAC's website

New indicator for which the benchmark will be established at the end of the 2015–16 fiscal year

March 31, 2016

Percentage of service standards met for formal access to information and privacy (ATIP) requests

ATIP (formal) 95%

March 31, 2016

Percentage of service standards met for digital copies

90%

March 31, 2016

Planning highlights

An increasing number of Canadians are accessing content of interest to them via the Internet and information technology. As evidence of this, LAC's website is among the most popular of all federal departments and agencies, averaging 1.5 million visits per month; additionally, each month there are 1.4 million searches conducted in the database of bibliographical records (AMICUS).

Bolstered by this trend, LAC will maintain its service excellence so that its clients have access to as much online content as possible. The institution will focus on a diversified approach that favours digital access, an increase in the quantity of content available on its site, and in-person services tailored to the needs of researchers who come to its public spaces at 395 Wellington Street, in Ottawa.

LAC will also continue its efforts to describe—as quickly and as clearly as possible—the content of a maximum number of information resources to make them easier to find and access. To do so, LAC will use descriptions provided by third parties, such as publishers, creators and donors. It will also continue to create new search aids and tools, in addition to updating those that already exist.

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Provide greater access to documentary heritage through digitization initiatives, an increase in online content and in the number of online search aids, joint exhibitions, and quality services facilitating access to information resources.
  • Enhance the visibility of the collection by holding public events in collaboration with other memory institutions that share LAC's vision.
  • Contribute to events such as the commemoration of the centenary of the First World War and the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017.
  • Continue to share content on LAC's social networks, namely through the blog, podcasts, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to reach as many clients as possible and to make the collection discoverable through a wide range of distribution channels.
  • Renew the national database, which contains over 25 million bibliographic records, so that it can leverage new technological advances and better meet the needs of clients and the Canadian library community.
  • Contribute to Canada's Action Plan on Open Government by providing open data sets, by ensuring that access restrictions to records in its collection are lifted, and by helping to develop the Government of Canada's virtual library.

Program 3.0: Internal services

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the organization. They are as follows: management and oversight services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; materiel services; procurement management services; policy, planning, evaluation services and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across the organization and not those that are provided to one single program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2015–16 
Main Estimates

2015–16
Planned spending

 

2016–17
Planned spending

 

2017–18
Planned spending

25,948,930

25,948,930

25,530,699

25,530,699

Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

223

223

223

Planning highlights

Internal services enable the institution to fulfill its mandate of acquiring, preserving and facilitating access to Canada's documentary heritage.

Faced with new expectations created by the rapid growth of digital technologies, LAC must remain at the forefront of innovation. The renewal of its technological infrastructure is the outcome of the reflection undertaken on how to ensure that the institution is able to fulfill its mandate more effectively in a digital environment. This new infrastructure will simplify how work is carried out by linking various sources of information related to the collection. 

Planned key activities for 2015–16

  • Develop a digital strategy for the entire institution to facilitate the transition to an integrated digital environment, which will ensure the continuity of the digital collection and make it easier to access.
  • Develop and implement a long-term infrastructure strategy that meets space requirements for preservation and services. This strategy will show LAC's desire to consolidate and streamline its record storage spaces.
  • Provide the support and guidance needed to develop skills that will enable LAC to be a leading institution in documentary heritage management.
  • Review all of LAC's organizational functions to simplify rules and optimize processes in order to maximize effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Develop LAC's 2016–19 business plan, taking into account consultations with its partners.

Section III: Supplementary information

Future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future-oriented statement of operations provides a general overview of LAC's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the condensed future-oriented statement of operations is prepared using the accrual accounting system, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the RPP are established using an expenditure basis of accounting, the amounts differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations and requested authorities, are available on LAC's website.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations
For the year ended March 31, 2015 (dollars)

Financial information

Estimated results
2014–15

Planned results
2015–16

Difference

Total expenses

153,341,030

141,295,947

(12,045,083)

Total revenues

2,383,000

2,231,000

152,000

Net cost of operations

150,958,030

139,064,947

(11,893,083)

The decrease in total expenses of $11.9 million is explained by the following elements, which affect the authority levels in the amount of approximately $7.7 million. Firstly, the 2015–16 Main Estimates are less than those for 2014–15, which is mainly due to the decrease of $3.1 million for the conversion of the facility in Gatineau, Quebec, to a collection storage facility with high-density shelving. Secondly, in 2014–15, LAC received additional authorities of $4.6 million for an operating budget carry forward from 2013–14 to 2014–15.

Finally, the cost of common services provided by other departments decreased by approximately $4.2 million after LAC vacated certain buildings in 2014–15. In fact, the consolidation of holdings at the collection storage facility with high-density shelving allowed LAC to reduce its facility costs.

Supplementary information tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–16 are available on LAC's website.

Tax expenditures and evaluations

The tax system may be used to achieve specific public policy objectives through the application of special measures, such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions,rals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational contact information

Library and Archives Canada

550 De la Cité Boulevard
Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0N4
Telephone: 613-996-5115
Telephone (toll-free): 1-866-578-7777
TTY: 613-992-6969 or 1-866-299-1699
Facsimile: 613-995-6274
www.bac-lac.gc.ca

395 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 0N4
Telephone: 613-996-5115
Facsimile: 613-995-6274
www.bac-lac.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Date modified: